May 30, 2022 Devotional Bible Study

May 30, 2022
Eastertide

Today’s Readings: 


Evocation

Death is swallowed up in victory. 

      Where, O death, is your sting? 

Christ is risen from the dead, the first fruits of those who have fallen asleep. 

      Death is swallowed up in victory. 

The trumpet will sound and the dead shall be raised. 

      Where, O death, is your sting? 

We shall not all sleep, but we shall be changed. 

      Death is swallowed up in victory. Where, O death, is your sting? 

  • from 1 Corinthians 15 [1]

Lord, in your mercy 

      hear our prayer. 

Lord, hear us. 

      Lord, graciously hear us.

Morning Prayers

Rejoicing in God’s new creation, as our Savior taught us, so we pray…

Our Father, who art in heaven,

    hallowed be thy Name,

    thy kingdom come,

    thy will be done,

        on earth as it is in heaven.

Give us this day our daily bread.

And forgive us our trespasses,

    as we forgive those

        who trespass against us.

And lead us not into temptation,

    but deliver us from evil.

For thine is the kingdom,

    and the power, and the glory,

    for ever and ever. Amen.

A Collect for the Renewal of Life

O God, the King eternal, whose light divides the day from the night and turns the shadow of death into the morning: Drive far from us all wrong desires, incline our hearts to keep your law, and guide our feet into the way of peace; that, having done your will with cheerfulness during the day, we may, when night comes, rejoice to give you thanks; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen. [2]

Collect of the Week

O God, the King of glory, who hast exalted thine only Son Jesus Christ with great triumph unto thy kingdom in heaven: We beseech thee, leave us not comfortless, but send to us thine Holy Ghost to comfort us, and exalt us unto the same place whither our Savior Christ is gone before; who liveth and reigneth with thee and the same Holy Ghost, one God, world without end. Amen. [3]

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit: as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen. 

Alleluia!

Hymn

“Hail this joyful day’s return”

By Hilary of Poitiers, 4th cent.

(1982 Hymnal # 223)

Short Verse

 I restrain my feet from every evil way,* that I may keep your word. 

Psalm 119:101

Morning Reading

Psalm 29, The glory of God

Ascribe to the Lord, O heavenly beings,[a]

    ascribe to the Lord glory and strength.

Ascribe to the Lord the glory of his name;

    worship the Lord in holy splendor.

The voice of the Lord is over the waters;

    the God of glory thunders,

    the Lord, over mighty waters.

The voice of the Lord is powerful;

    the voice of the Lord is full of majesty.

The voice of the Lord breaks the cedars;

    the Lord breaks the cedars of Lebanon.

He makes Lebanon skip like a calf

    and Sirion like a young wild ox.

The voice of the Lord flashes forth flames of fire.

The voice of the Lord shakes the wilderness;

    the Lord shakes the wilderness of Kadesh.

The voice of the Lord causes the oaks to whirl[b]

    and strips the forest bare,

    and in his temple all say, “Glory!”

10 

The Lord sits enthroned over the flood;

    the Lord sits enthroned as king forever.

11 

May the Lord give strength to his people!

    May the Lord bless his people with peace!

Let us pray. 

Open our ears, glorious Lord Christ, to hear the music of your voice above the chaos of this world; open our eyes to see the vision of your glory, for you are our King, now and for ever. Amen. [4]

Morning Lesson

Flood and voice combine to cleanse us.

In Psalm 29 we find “a prophecy of the Gospel, that it shall resound with power in all the world. . . . He established the flood, Baptism, in which the old Adam is drowned and the new man arises,” (Martin Luther). [5] “This psalm effectively links the Temple, the created world, and the heavens as places where God’s presence is especially perceived. He who has power over all creation desires every man and woman to dwell eternally with him in peace. We ought not fear the waters stirred by the storms on the sea for that same water consecrates us to him in Baptism by which we grow in holiness through our life in Christ.” [6]

“God’s power is a terrifying thing. The sound of His voice brings forth creation, shakes the mountains and trees, and unleashes the great flood that destroyed the earth. We sinners might be destroyed by the power of His holy , powerful voice. Yet “the Word became flesh and dwelt among us” (Jn 1:14). God came to us in Jesus to speak His love and grace. In Baptism, flood and voice combine to cleanse us (this psalm was traditionally used at Baptisms). Hearing His gracious voice , we join heaven and earth in praise. • O Word of God, You became flesh to be our Savior. Let us hear Your powerful voice. Amen.” [7]


Midday Prayer

For Guidance

O God, by whom the meek are guided in judgment, and light riseth up in darkness for the godly: Grant us, in all our doubts and uncertainties, the grace to ask what thou wouldest have us to do, that the Spirit of wisdom may save us from all false choices, and that in thy light we may see light, and in thy straight path may not stumble; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen. [8]

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit: as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen. 

Alleluia!

Short Verse

Come, let us sing to the LORD;* let us shout for joy to the Rock of our salvation. 

Psalm 95:1

Midday Reading

Exodus 40:16-38, God’s glory on the tabernacle

16 Moses did everything just as the Lord had commanded him. 17 In the first month in the second year, on the first day of the month, the tabernacle was set up. 18 Moses set up the tabernacle; he laid its bases and set up its frames and put in its poles and raised up its pillars, 19 and he spread the tent over the tabernacle and put the covering of the tent over it as the Lord had commanded Moses. 20 He took the covenant and put it into the ark and put the poles on the ark and set the cover above the ark, 21 and he brought the ark into the tabernacle and set up the curtain for screening and screened the ark of the covenant as the Lord had commanded Moses. 22 He put the table in the tent of meeting, on the north side of the tabernacle, outside the curtain, 23 and set the bread in order on it before the Lord as the Lord had commanded Moses. 24 He put the lampstand in the tent of meeting, opposite the table on the south side of the tabernacle, 25 and set up the lamps before the Lord as the Lord had commanded Moses. 26 He put the golden altar in the tent of meeting before the curtain 27 and offered fragrant incense on it as the Lord had commanded Moses. 28 He also put in place the screen for the entrance of the tabernacle. 29 He set the altar of burnt offering at the entrance of the tabernacle of the tent of meeting and offered on it the burnt offering and the grain offering as the Lord had commanded Moses. 30 He set the basin between the tent of meeting and the altar and put water in it for washing, 31 with which Moses and Aaron and his sons washed their hands and their feet. 32 When they went into the tent of meeting and when they approached the altar, they washed as the Lord had commanded Moses. 33 He set up the court around the tabernacle and the altar and put up the screen at the gate of the court. So Moses finished the work.

34 Then the cloud covered the tent of meeting, and the glory of the Lord filled the tabernacle. 35 Moses was not able to enter the tent of meeting because the cloud settled upon it, and the glory of the Lord filled the tabernacle. 36 Whenever the cloud was taken up from the tabernacle, the Israelites would set out on each stage of their journey, 37 but if the cloud was not taken up, then they did not set out until the day that it was taken up. 38 For the cloud of the Lord was on the tabernacle by day, and fire was in the cloud[a] by night, before the eyes of all the house of Israel at each stage of their journey.

Midday Lesson

The sacred mountain and the sacred tent

“God told Moses how to build the Tabernacle, and Moses delegated jobs in order to do it. God allows people to participate with him in carrying out his will. Your task is not just to sit and watch God work but to give your best effort when work needs to be done.” [9]

“The physical care of the Tabernacle required a long list of tasks, and each was important to the work of God’s house. This principle is important to remember today when God’s house is the church. There are many seemingly unimportant tasks that must be done to keep your church building maintained. Washing dishes, painting walls, or shoveling snow may not seem very spiritual; but they are vital to the ministry of the church and are an important part of our worship of God.” [10]

Moses finished the work (v. 33) “recalls how God ‘finished his work’ on the seventh day of creation (Gen 2:2). This and other hints imply that the Tabernacle is a miniature replica of the universe.” [11] 

  1. “The same ‘Spirit of God’ that supervises the building of the sanctuary in Exodus (31:3) oversaw the formation of the cosmos in Genesis (Gen 1:2).” [12]
  2. “The Lord instructs Moses to build the tent with seven sayings (25:1; 30:11, 17, 22, 34; 31:1, 12), just as he spoke the world into being in seven days (Gen 1:1—2:3).” [13]
  3. “Both the seventh saying to Moses and the seventh day of creation concern the Sabbath (31:12-17; Gen 2:1-3).” [14]
  4. “Moses fulfills the seven divine sayings in seven stages, each time ‘as the Lord had commanded’ (40:19, 21, 23, 25, 27, 29, 32).” [15]
  5. “The description of how the Tabernacle was ‘finished’ (39:32) and how Moses ‘saw’ the work (39:43) recalls how God ‘finished’ his work in creation (Gen 2:1-2) and ‘saw’ that it was good (Gen 1:31).” [16]
  6. “Just as the whole earth is ‘full’ of divine glory (Is 6:3), so the Tabernacle, on a smaller scale, is ‘filled’ with the glory of the Lord (40:34).” [17]

“The Tabernacle was God’s home on earth. He filled it with his glory—the overpowering sense of his presence. Almost 500 years later, Solomon built the Temple, which replaced the Tabernacle as the central place of worship. God also filled the Temple with his glory (2 Chr 5:13-14). But when Israel turned from God, his glory and presence departed from the Temple, and the Temple was destroyed by invading armies (2 Kgs 25). The Temple was rebuilt in 515 B.C., and God’s glory returned in even greater splendor nearly five centuries later when Jesus Christ, God’s Son, entered it and taught. When Jesus was crucified, God’s glory again left the Temple. But God no longer needed a physical building after Jesus rose from the dead. God’s temple now is his church, the body of believers.” [18]

“Yahweh descends from the heights of Sinai into the hiddenness of the sanctuary (25:8). Hereafter, the Tabernacle functions as a portable representation of Sinai, i.e., as a place of encounter with Yahweh that will accompany Israel through the wilderness. Several parallels suggest this connection between the sacred mountain and the sacred tent.” [19] 

  1. “Both are places of divine habitation. The glory of the Lord settles on the tent (40:34-35) just as it had on the mountaintop (24:15-16).” [20]
  2. “Both are places of divine revelation. The Lord continues to instruct Moses in the tent (Lev 1:1-2) just as he had on the mountain (24:12; 31:18).” [21]
  3. “Both are places of spatial segregation. The sanctuary has three zones: an outer court open to everyone, a holy place restricted to priests, and a most holy place, where only the high priest can enter the divine presence. Sinai is likewise marked off into three zones: the people assemble at its base (19:23-24); Aaron and the elders are permitted partway up the slopes (24:1); and only Moses is allowed to enter the fiery cloud at the summit (24:2, 15-18).” [22]

Verse 35 tells us, Moses was not able to enter the tent of meeting because the cloud settled upon it… “Perhaps Moses is forbidden to enter the thick darkness of the cloud until summoned by Yahweh (as in 24:15-18). For another parallel, see 1 Kings 8:10-11… The Greek LXX reads: ‘the cloud was overshadowing it.’ • The NT makes use of the Greek expression to describe both the conception of Jesus in the womb of Mary (Lk 1:35) and the overshadowing of Peter, James, and John on the mount of Transfiguration (Mt 17:5; Mk 9:7; Lk 9:34).” [23]

“The Israelites were once Egyptian slaves making bricks without straw. Here they were following the pillar of cloud and the pillar of fire, carrying the Tabernacle they had built for God. Exodus begins in gloom and ends in glory. This parallels our progress through the Christian life. We begin as slaves to sin, are redeemed by God, and end our pilgrimage living with God forever. The lessons the Israelites learned along the way are ones we also need to learn.” [24]

“Israel will not leave Sinai until Num 10:11-13. Thereafter the Lord will lead the people by stages to Canaan (Num 9:15-23; 33:1-49).” [25]


Eventide Prayer

The Lord is my Strength and my Shield, my heart hath trusted in Him, and I am helped: therefore my heart danceth for joy, and in my song will I praise Him. Amen.

  • William Laud [26]

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit: as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen. 

Alleluia!

Short Verse

The earth is the Lord’s and all the fullness thereof, the world and we who dwell within. Thanks be to God. 

Traditional

Eventide Reading

Acts 16:35-40, The magistrates apologize to Paul and Silas

35 When morning came, the magistrates sent the police, saying, “Let those men go.” 36 And the jailer reported the message to Paul, saying, “The magistrates sent word to let you go; therefore come out now and go in peace.” 37 But Paul replied, “They have beaten us in public, uncondemned, men who are Romans, and have thrown us into prison, and now are they going to discharge us in secret? Certainly not! Let them come and take us out themselves.” 38 The police reported these words to the magistrates, and they were afraid when they heard that they were Romans, 39 so they came and apologized to them. And they took them out and asked them to leave the city. 40 After leaving the prison they went to Lydia’s home, and when they had seen and encouraged the brothers and sisters there, they departed.

Eventide Lesson

A right to justice under the civil law

Note that, in verse 37, “Paul does not appeal to his Roman citizenship in order to escape punishment for Christ, which he could easily have done. Rather, he uses his citizenship to have additional opportunities to proclaim the gospel (see also 22:22-30).” [27] “Christians have the right to demand justice under the civil law. As a Roman citizen, Paul and Silas should not have been flogged without a trial and a verdict of guilt. Paul will make good use of his Roman citizenship again in a later imprisonment as an occasion to introduce more people to the Gospel (cf. Acts 22:25).” [28]

Concluding Prayer of the Church

Lord, keep us safe this night, Secure from all our fears; May angels guard us while we sleep, Till morning light appears.

  • John Leland, 1754-1841 [29]

Citations:

[1] Church House Publishing. (2005). Morning Prayer in Easter. In Common worship: Daily prayer (pp. 326). 

[2] Episcopal Church. (1979). Daily Office. In The Book of common prayer: And administration of the sacraments, and other rites and ceremonies of the church, according to the use of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States of America: Together with the psalter, or, Psalms of David (pp. 99). New York, NY: Church Publishing Incorporated.

[3] Episcopal Church. (1979). Collects. In The Book of common prayer: And administration of the sacraments, and other rites and ceremonies of the church, according to the use of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States of America: Together with the psalter, or, Psalms of David (pp. 175). New York, NY: Church Publishing Incorporated.

[4] Church House Publishing. (2005). Psalter. In Common worship: Daily prayer (pp. 809). 

[5] A., E. E. (2016). Psalms. In The Lutheran study Bible: English standard version (Kindle ed., pp. 3664). Saint Louis: Concordia Publishing House.

[6] Cole, J. (Ed.). (2015). Psalms. In Didache Bible: With commentaries based on the Catechism of the Catholic Church (Kindle ed., p.1383). Downers Grove, IL: Midwest Theological Forum, Ignatius Press.

[7] A., E. E. (2016). Psalms. In The Lutheran study Bible: English standard version (Kindle ed., pp. 3666). Saint Louis: Concordia Publishing House.

[8] Episcopal Church. (1979). Prayers and Thanksgivings. In The Book of common prayer: And administration of the sacraments, and other rites and ceremonies of the church, according to the use of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States of America: Together with the psalter, or, Psalms of David (pp. 832). New York, NY: Church Publishing Incorporated.

[9] Tyndale House Publishers. (2012). Exodus. In Chronological life application study Bible (Kindle ed., p. 5799). Carol Stream, IL: Tyndale House Pub.

[10] Ibid. 9

[11] Hahn, S., Mitch, C., & Walters, D. (2012). Commentary. In Exodus: With introduction, commentary, and Notes (Kindle, p. 82). essay, Ignatius Press. 

[12] Ibid. 11

[13] Ibid. 11

[14] Ibid. 11

[15] Ibid. 11

[16] Ibid. 11

[17] Ibid. 11

[18] Tyndale House Publishers. (2012). Exodus. In Chronological life application study Bible (Kindle ed., p. 5800). Carol Stream, IL: Tyndale House Pub.

[19] Hahn, S., Mitch, C., & Walters, D. (2012). Commentary. In Exodus: With introduction, commentary, and Notes (Kindle, p. 82). essay, Ignatius Press. 

[20] Ibid. 19

[21] Ibid. 19

[22] Ibid. 19

[23] Ibid. 19

[24] Tyndale House Publishers. (2012). Exodus. In Chronological life application study Bible (Kindle ed., p. 5800). Carol Stream, IL: Tyndale House Pub.

[25] Hahn, S., Mitch, C., & Walters, D. (2012). Commentary. In Exodus: With introduction, commentary, and Notes (Kindle, p. 82). essay, Ignatius Press. 

[26] LAUD, W. (1855). Monday Compline: Thanksgiving. In The Private Devotions of Dr. William Laud, Archbishop of Canterbury and Martyr (Ebook ed., p. 9). London and Oxford: John Henry & Jas. Parker.

[27] Academic Community of St. Athanasius Academy of Orthodox Theology (2008). Acts. In The Orthodox study Bible (p. 1529). Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson.

[28] Cole, J. (Ed.). (2015). Acts. In Didache Bible: With commentaries based on the Catechism of the Catholic Church (Kindle ed., p. 3061). Downers Grove, IL: Midwest Theological Forum, Ignatius Press.

[29] Kitch, A. E. (2004). Bedtime Prayers. In The Anglican family prayer book (Kindle ed., pp.212). Harrisburg, PA: Morehouse Pub.

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