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May 17, 2022 Devotional Bible Study

May 17, 2022
Eastertide

Today’s Readings: 


Invocation

The Lord is risen from the tomb who for our sakes hung upon the tree. Alleluia.

GLORY be to thee, O Lord, glory be to thee: glory to thee, who hast given me sleep to refresh my weakness, and to alleviate the labours of this fragile flesh. [1]

Lord, in your mercy 

      hear our prayer. 

Lord, hear us. 

      Lord, graciously hear us.

Morning Prayers

Rejoicing in God’s new creation, let us pray with confidence as our Saviour has taught us…

Our Father, who art in heaven,

    hallowed be thy Name,

    thy kingdom come,

    thy will be done,

        on earth as it is in heaven.

Give us this day our daily bread.

And forgive us our trespasses,

    as we forgive those

        who trespass against us.

And lead us not into temptation,

    but deliver us from evil.

For thine is the kingdom,

    and the power, and the glory,

    for ever and ever. Amen.

Whatsoever things are true, 

whatsoever things are honest, 

whatsoever things are just, 

whatsoever things are pure, 

whatsoever things are lovely, 

whatsoever things are of good report; 

if there be any virtue, and if there be any praise, (Philip. iv. 8.) that we may think on these things, and do them,     

      Grant us, O Lord.

  • Lancelot Andrewes [2]

Every morning will I bless You and praise Your name forever and to the ages of ages. You have been our refuge, O Lord, from generation to generation. I said, “Lord, have mercy on me, heal my soul, for against You have I sinned.” To You have I fled for refuge; teach me to do Your will, for You are my God. For with You is the source of life, and in Your light shall we see light. Let Your mercy remain upon those who know You. Lord, grant that this day we may be kept without sin. Blessed are You, O Lord, the God of our fathers, and praised and glorified is Your name forevermore. AMEN.” [3]

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit: as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen. 

Alleluia!

Hymn

“Now the green blade riseth from the buried grain”

(1982 Hymnal # 204)

By John Macleod Campbell Crum, 1872-1958

Short Verse

Lord, be merciful to me, a sinner. Christ, be merciful to me, a sinner. Father, be merciful to me, a sinner. Spirit, be merciful to me, a sinner. Lord, be merciful to me, a sinner. 

Traditional

Figure drawing by John Singer Sargent

Morning Reading

2 Samuel 1:4-27, David mourns Jonathan’s death

4 David said to him, “How did things go? Tell me!” He answered, “The army fled from the battle, but also many of the army fell and died; and Saul and his son Jonathan also died.” 5 Then David asked the young man who was reporting to him, “How do you know that Saul and his son Jonathan died?” 6 The young man reporting to him said, “I happened to be on Mount Gilboa; and there was Saul leaning on his spear, while the chariots and the horsemen drew close to him. 7 When he looked behind him, he saw me, and called to me. I answered, ‘Here sir.’ 8 And he said to me, ‘Who are you?’ I answered him, ‘I am an Amalekite.’ 9 He said to me, ‘Come, stand over me and kill me; for convulsions have seized me, and yet my life still lingers.’ 10 So I stood over him, and killed him, for I knew that he could not live after he had fallen. I took the crown that was on his head and the armlet that was on his arm, and I have brought them here to my lord.”

11 Then David took hold of his clothes and tore them; and all the men who were with him did the same. 12 They mourned and wept, and fasted until evening for Saul and for his son Jonathan, and for the army of the Lord and for the house of Israel, because they had fallen by the sword. 13 David said to the young man who had reported to him, “Where do you come from?” He answered, “I am the son of a resident alien, an Amalekite.” 14 David said to him, “Were you not afraid to lift your hand to destroy the Lord’s anointed?” 15 Then David called one of the young men and said, “Come here and strike him down.” So he struck him down and he died. 16 David said to him, “Your blood be on your head; for your own mouth has testified against you, saying, ‘I have killed the Lord’s anointed.’”

17 David intoned this lamentation over Saul and his son Jonathan. 18 (He ordered that The Song of the Bow[a] be taught to the people of Judah; it is written in the Book of Jashar.) He said:

19 

Your glory, O Israel, lies slain upon your high places!

    How the mighty have fallen!

20 

Tell it not in Gath,

    proclaim it not in the streets of Ashkelon;

or the daughters of the Philistines will rejoice,

    the daughters of the uncircumcised will exult.

21 

You mountains of Gilboa,

    let there be no dew or rain upon you,

    nor bounteous fields![b]

For there the shield of the mighty was defiled,

    the shield of Saul, anointed with oil no more.

22 

From the blood of the slain,

    from the fat of the mighty,

the bow of Jonathan did not turn back,

    nor the sword of Saul return empty.

23 

Saul and Jonathan, beloved and lovely!

    In life and in death they were not divided;

they were swifter than eagles,

    they were stronger than lions.

24 

O daughters of Israel, weep over Saul,

    who clothed you with crimson, in luxury,

    who put ornaments of gold on your apparel.

25 

How the mighty have fallen

    in the midst of the battle!

Jonathan lies slain upon your high places.

26 

    I am distressed for you, my brother Jonathan;

greatly beloved were you to me;

    your love to me was wonderful,

    passing the love of women.

27 

How the mighty have fallen,

    and the weapons of war perished!

Morning Lesson

Jonathan’s love was deeper

They mourned and wept and fasted all day [v. 12]. “David and his men were visibly shaken over Saul’s death. Their actions showed their genuine sorrow over the loss of their king, their friend Jonathan, and the other soldiers of Israel who died that day. They were not ashamed to grieve. Today, some people consider expressing emotions to be a sign of weakness. Those who wish to appear strong try to hide their feelings. But expressing our grief can help us deal with our intense sorrow when a loved one dies.” [4]

“The man identified himself as an Amalekite [v. 13]  from Saul’s camp (2 Sam 1:2). He may have been an Amalekite under Israelite jurisdiction, but more likely he was a battlefield scavenger. Obviously the man was lying both about his identity and about what had happened on the battlefield. (Compare his story with the account in 1 Sam 31:3-4.) Because he had Saul’s crown with him, something the Philistines wouldn’t have left behind, we can infer that he found Saul dead on the battlefield before the Philistines arrived (1 Sam 31:8).” [5]

“A life of deceit leads to disaster. The man lied to gain some personal reward for killing David’s rival, but he misread David’s character. If David had rewarded him for murdering the king, David would have shared his guilt. Instead, David had the messenger killed. Lying can bring disaster upon the liar, even for something he or she has not done.” [6]

“The Amalekites were a fierce nomadic tribe that frequently conducted surprise raids on Canaanite villages. They had been Israel’s enemies since Moses’ time. David had just destroyed an Amalekite band of raiders who had burned his city and kidnapped its women and children (1 Sam 30:1-20). This man was probably unaware of David’s recent confrontations with the Amalekites; if he had been, he might not have come. Instead, he incurred David’s wrath by posing as an enemy of Israel and claiming to have killed God’s chosen king.” [7]

“Why did David consider it a crime to kill the king [v. 16], even though Saul was his enemy? David believed that God had anointed Saul, and only God could remove him from office. If it became casual or commonplace to assassinate the king, the whole society would become chaotic. It was God’s job, not David’s, to judge Saul’s sins (Lev 19:18). We must realize that God has placed rulers in authority over us, and we should respect their positions (Rom 13:1-7).” [8]
“David was a talented musician. He played the harp (1 Sam 16:23), he brought music into the worship services of the Temple (1 Chr 25), and he wrote many of the psalms. Here we are told that he wrote a funeral song [vv. 17-18] in memory of Saul and his son Jonathan, David’s closest friend. Music played an important role in Israel’s history.” [9]

[10]

“Saul had caused much trouble for David, but when he died, David composed a song in memory of the king and his son [vv. 17-27]. David had every reason to hate Saul, but he chose not to. Instead, he chose to look at the good Saul had done and to ignore the times when Saul had attacked him. It takes courage to lay aside hatred and hurt and to respect the positive side of another person, especially an enemy.” [11]

“By saying that Jonathan’s love was ‘deeper than the love of women’ [v. 26], David was not implying that he had a sexual relationship with Jonathan. Homosexual acts were absolutely forbidden in Israel. Leviticus 18:22 calls practicing homosexuality “detestable,” and Leviticus 20:13 decrees the death penalty for those who practice homosexuality. David was simply restating the deep brotherhood and faithful friendship he had with Jonathan.” [12]


Lord, in your mercy 

      hear our prayer. 

Lord, hear us. 

      Lord, graciously hear us.

Midday Prayer

     Now the God of peace, that brought again from the dead our Lord Jesus Christ, that great Shepherd of the sheep, through the blood of the everlasting covenant; 

     Make us perfect in every good work to do his will, working in us that which is well-pleasing in his sight, through Jesus Christ; to whom be glory for ever and ever.—Heb. xiii. 20, 21.

  • Lancelot Andrewes [13]

LET NOTHING DISTURB THEE, 

Nothing affright thee; 

All things are passing— 

God never changeth. 

Patient endurance attaineth to all things; 

Who God possesseth, 

In nothing is wanting. 

God alone sufficeth. 

  • Saint Theresa of Avila [14]

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit: as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen. 

Alleluia!

Short Verse

Your testimonies are very sure,* and holiness adorns your house, O LORD, for ever and for evermore. 

Psalm 93:6

Monk with a wine by Eduard von Grutzner

Midday Reading

Excerpt: “The Sayings of the Holy Desert Fathers”

They used to say about Abba Paphnutius that he would not readily drink wine, and that on one occasion he came by chance upon a band of thieves, and found them drinking; and the captain of the thieves recognized him, and knew that he never drank wine; and he looked closely at him [and saw that] he was a man of great ascetic works. And the captain filled a cup with wine and, taking a sword in his hand, he said to the old man, “If you will not drink I will slay you”; and the old man knew that the grace of God wished to work on the captain of the thieves through him, and sought to do good to him, so he took [the cup] and drank [the wine]. Then the captain made excuse to him and said, ” Forgive me, father, for having distressed you”; and the old man said to him, ” I believe, by God, that through this cup God will forgive you your sins.” And the captain of thieves said to him, “I believe, by God; from this time forth I will never vex any man.” Thus, because for God’s sake Paphnutius gave up his own wish, he was able to do good to all that band of thieves.

[15]

Lord, in your mercy 

      hear our prayer. 

Lord, hear us. 

      Lord, graciously hear us.

Eventide Prayers

Abide with me, for it is toward evening, and the day of this toilsome life is now far spent.—Jer. vi. 4. 

Let thy strength be made perfect in my weakness.—2 Cor. xii. 9.

  • Lancelot Andrewes [16]
For all gifts.

Almighty God, give unto me, I beseech Thee, a full increase of faith, hope, and charity; and that I may obtain that which Thou dost promise, make me love that which Thou dost command, through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

  • William Laud, Abp of Canterbury & Martyr [17]

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit: as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen. 

Alleluia!

Short Verse

My soul waits for the LORD, more than watchmen for the morning,* more than watchmen for the morning. 

Psalm 130:5

Eventide Reading

Acts 11:27-30, Love embodied in care for others

27 At that time prophets came down from Jerusalem to Antioch. 28 One of them named Agabus stood up and predicted by the Spirit that there would be a severe famine over all the world; and this took place during the reign of Claudius. 29 The disciples determined that according to their ability, each would send relief to the believers[a] living in Judea; 30 this they did, sending it to the elders by Barnabas and Saul.

Eventide Lesson

The bearded ones

The “prophets [v. 27] are Christian believers within the Church who have the gift of prophecy (see 1Co 12:29; 14:3, 29; Eph 4:11).” [18]

“[The] great famine [vv. 29, 29] took place in AD 44-51, beginning in Judea and spreading to Greece and Italy. The principle of giving, each according to his ability, is one that continues in the Church to this day.” [19]

“The elders (lit., ‘the bearded ones’) [v. 30] are the presbyters, or priests; they are the clergy ordained and put in charge of the local churches by the apostles who established them (see 14:23). As to the orders of the ministry, bishops (the apostles) are first mentioned in 1:20.. Deacons appear in 6:2-6. Here is the first reference to presbyters or priests.” [20]

Concluding Prayer of the Church

Into your hands, O Lord, I commend my spirit; For you have redeemed me, O Lord, O God of truth. Keep me, O Lord, as the apple of your eye; Hide me under the shadow of your wings. †

Lord, you now have set your servant free to go in peace as you have promised; for these eyes of mine have seen the Savior, whom you have prepared for all the world to see: a Light to enlighten the nations, and the glory of your people Israel. Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit: as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit: as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen. 

Alleluia!


Citations:

[1] Andrewes, Lancelot. The Private Devotions and Manual for the Sick of Launcelot Andrews (Kindle ed., p. 210). Kindle Edition. 

[2] Ibid. 1, P. 221

[3] Papavassiliou, V. (2014). Morning Prayers. In The ancient faith prayer book (Kindle ed., p. 14). Chesterton, IN: Ancient Faith Publishing.

[4] Tyndale House Publishers. (2012). 2 Samuel. In Chronological life application study Bible (Kindle ed., p. 6067). Carol Stream, IL: Tyndale House Pub.

[5] Ibid. 4, P. 6068

[6] Ibid. 4, P. 6068

[7] Ibid. 4, P. 6068

[8] Ibid. 4, P. 6068

[9] Ibid. 4, P. 6068

[10] Tyndale House Publishers. (2012). Famous Songs in the Bible [Chart]. In Chronological life application study Bible (Kindle ed., p. 6067). Carol Stream, IL: Tyndale House Pub.

[11] Tyndale House Publishers. (2012). 2 Samuel. In Chronological life application study Bible (Kindle ed., p. 6068). Carol Stream, IL: Tyndale House Pub.

[12] Ibid. 11

[13] Andrewes, Lancelot. The Private Devotions and Manual for the Sick of Launcelot Andrews (Kindle ed., p. 419). Kindle Edition.

[14] Cobb, D., & Olsen, D. A. (2014). Daily Prayers. In Saint Augustine’s prayer book: A book of devotions (Kindle ed., p. 54). Cincinnati, OH: Forward Movement.

[15] Of fasting and abstinence and of other [similar] labours. (1907). In The Sayings of the Holy Fathers: Books I and II (Kindle ed., p. 20).  W. Budge (Ed.)

[16] Andrewes, Lancelot. The Private Devotions and Manual for the Sick of Launcelot Andrews (Kindle ed., p. 2554). Kindle Edition. 

[17] LAUD, W. (1855). Tuesday Compline: For all gifts. In The Private Devotions of Dr. William Laud, Archbishop of Canterbury and Martyr (Ebook ed., p. 19). London and Oxford: John Henry & Jas. Parker.

[18] Academic Community of St. Athanasius Academy of Orthodox Theology (2008). Acts. In The Orthodox study Bible (p. 1519). Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson.

[19] Ibid. 18

[20] Ibid. 18

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