May 16, 2022 Devotional Bible Study

May 16, 2022
Eastertide

Today’s Readings: 


Invocation

The Lord is risen from the tomb who for our sakes hung upon the tree. Alleluia.

GLORY be to thee, O Lord, glory be to thee: glory to thee, who hast given me sleep to refresh my weakness, and to alleviate the labours of this fragile flesh. [1]

Lord, in your mercy 

      hear our prayer. 

Lord, hear us. 

      Lord, graciously hear us.

Morning Prayers

Rejoicing in God’s new creation, let us pray with confidence as our Saviour has taught us…

Our Father, who art in heaven,

    hallowed be thy Name,

    thy kingdom come,

    thy will be done,

        on earth as it is in heaven.

Give us this day our daily bread.

And forgive us our trespasses,

    as we forgive those

        who trespass against us.

And lead us not into temptation,

    but deliver us from evil.

For thine is the kingdom,

    and the power, and the glory,

    for ever and ever. Amen.

May Your mercy, O Lord, be upon us, for in You have we put our trust. Blessed are You, O Lord; teach me Your statutes. Blessed are You, O Master; make me understand Your statutes. Blessed are You, O Holy One; enlighten me with Your statutes. Lord, Your mercy endures forever: despise not the works of Your hands. To You is due praise, to You is due song, to You is due glory, to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit, now and forever, and to the ages of ages. AMEN. [2]

Collect of the Week

O Almighty God, whom truly to know is everlasting life: Grant us so perfectly to know thy Son Jesus Christ to be the way, the truth, and the life, that we may steadfastly follow his steps in the way that leadeth to eternal life; through the same thy Son Jesus Christ our Lord, who liveth and reigneth with thee, in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen. [3]

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit: as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen. 

Alleluia!

Hymn

“O sons and daughters, let us sing”
Lyrics [4]:

Alleluia, alleluia!

Alleluia, alleluia!

1. O sons and daughters, let us sing!

The King of heaven, the glorious King,

o’er death and hell rose triumphing.

Alleluia, alleluia!

2. That Easter morn, at break of day,

the faithful women went their way

to seek the tomb where Jesus lay.

Alleluia, alleluia!

3. An angel clad in white they see,

who sat, and spake unto the three,

“Your Lord doth go to Galilee.”

Alleluia, alleluia!

4. That night the apostles met in fear;

amidst them came their Lord most dear,

and said, “My peace be on all here.”

Alleluia, alleluia!

5. On this most holy day of days,

to God your hearts and voices raise,

in laud and jubilee and praise.

Alleluia, alleluia!

Alleluia, alleluia!

Alleluia, alleluia!

Short Verse

Blessed are they which do hunger and thirst after righteousness: for they shall be filled. 

Matthew 5:6, KJV

Morning Reading

Psalm 133, How good it is to live in unity

How very good and pleasant it is

when kindred live together in unity!

It is like the precious oil on the head,

running down upon the beard,

on the beard of Aaron,

running down over the collar of his robes.

It is like the dew of Hermon,

which falls on the mountains of Zion.

For there the Lord ordained his blessing,

life forevermore.

[5]

Morning Lesson

Unity in Christ

Psalms 120-134 “are called odes of ascents. These are also known as ‘graduals.’ In her service of worship, the Church ascends by degrees to the heavenly holy of holies, for worship is an ascent of the heart and mind to the Holy Trinity in adoration, praise, and thanksgiving.” [6]

“Living in unity is as soothing as being anointed with oil, as refreshing as dew from the mountains on a parched desert. Descriptions of the goodness and pleasure of unity and brotherhood reminds us that we often experience discord, strife, and disunity instead. This is true of our families, our communities, and our churches. Yet Christ’s prayer is ‘that they may be one, even as We are one’s (Jn 17:11). He bestows that unity through the Holy Spirit in the refreshing waters of Baptism.  We praise You, Lord, for the unity we have through You with all our fellow christians. Amen.” [7]


Lord, in your mercy 

      hear our prayer. 

Lord, hear us. 

      Lord, graciously hear us.

Midday Prayers

      GOD is the Lord, which hath shewed us light; keep holiday in multitudes, even unto the horns of the altar.—Psalm cxviii. 27. 

     By thy resurrection, raise us up unto newness of life (Rom. vi. 4.); grafting in us fruits meet for repentance.—Matt. iii. 8.

  • Lancelot Andrewes [8]

GOD, GIVE US GRACE to accept with serenity the things that cannot be changed, the courage to change the things that should be changed, and the wisdom to distinguish the one from the other. Amen.

  • Attributed to Reinhold Niebuhr [9]

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit: as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen. 

Alleluia!

Short Verse

You are to be praised, O God, in Zion;… To you that hear prayer shall all flesh come,* because of their transgressions. 

Psalm 65:1–2

David and Jonathan, 1642, by the studio or a follower of Rembrandt. Jonathan is the figure in the turban. (Wikipedia)

Midday Reading

1 Samuel 20:1-23, 35-42, The love of David and Jonathan

20 David fled from Naioth in Ramah. He came before Jonathan and said, “What have I done? What is my guilt? And what is my sin against your father that he is trying to take my life?” 2 He said to him, “Far from it! You shall not die. My father does nothing either great or small without disclosing it to me; and why should my father hide this from me? Never!” 3 But David also swore, “Your father knows well that you like me; and he thinks, ‘Do not let Jonathan know this, or he will be grieved.’ But truly, as the Lord lives and as you yourself live, there is but a step between me and death.” 4 Then Jonathan said to David, “Whatever you say, I will do for you.” 5 David said to Jonathan, “Tomorrow is the new moon, and I should not fail to sit with the king at the meal; but let me go, so that I may hide in the field until the third evening. 6 If your father misses me at all, then say, ‘David earnestly asked leave of me to run to Bethlehem his city; for there is a yearly sacrifice there for all the family.’ 7 If he says, ‘Good!’ it will be well with your servant; but if he is angry, then know that evil has been determined by him. 8 Therefore deal kindly with your servant, for you have brought your servant into a sacred covenant[a] with you. But if there is guilt in me, kill me yourself; why should you bring me to your father?” 9 Jonathan said, “Far be it from you! If I knew that it was decided by my father that evil should come upon you, would I not tell you?” 10 Then David said to Jonathan, “Who will tell me if your father answers you harshly?” 11 Jonathan replied to David, “Come, let us go out into the field.” So they both went out into the field.

12 Jonathan said to David, “By the Lord, the God of Israel! When I have sounded out my father, about this time tomorrow, or on the third day, if he is well disposed toward David, shall I not then send and disclose it to you? 13 But if my father intends to do you harm, the Lord do so to Jonathan, and more also, if I do not disclose it to you, and send you away, so that you may go in safety. May the Lord be with you, as he has been with my father. 14 If I am still alive, show me the faithful love of the Lord; but if I die,[b] 15 never cut off your faithful love from my house, even if the Lord were to cut off every one of the enemies of David from the face of the earth.” 16 Thus Jonathan made a covenant with the house of David, saying, “May the Lord seek out the enemies of David.” 17 Jonathan made David swear again by his love for him; for he loved him as he loved his own life.

18 Jonathan said to him, “Tomorrow is the new moon; you will be missed, because your place will be empty. 19 On the day after tomorrow, you shall go a long way down; go to the place where you hid yourself earlier, and remain beside the stone there.[c] 20 I will shoot three arrows to the side of it, as though I shot at a mark. 21 Then I will send the boy, saying, ‘Go, find the arrows.’ If I say to the boy, ‘Look, the arrows are on this side of you, collect them,’ then you are to come, for, as the Lord lives, it is safe for you and there is no danger. 22 But if I say to the young man, ‘Look, the arrows are beyond you,’ then go; for the Lord has sent you away. 23 As for the matter about which you and I have spoken, the Lord is witness[d] between you and me forever.”

35 In the morning Jonathan went out into the field to the appointment with David, and with him was a little boy. 36 He said to the boy, “Run and find the arrows that I shoot.” As the boy ran, he shot an arrow beyond him. 37 When the boy came to the place where Jonathan’s arrow had fallen, Jonathan called after the boy and said, “Is the arrow not beyond you?” 38 Jonathan called after the boy, “Hurry, be quick, do not linger.” So Jonathan’s boy gathered up the arrows and came to his master. 39 But the boy knew nothing; only Jonathan and David knew the arrangement. 40 Jonathan gave his weapons to the boy and said to him, “Go and carry them to the city.” 41 As soon as the boy had gone, David rose from beside the stone heap[a] and prostrated himself with his face to the ground. He bowed three times, and they kissed each other, and wept with each other; David wept the more.[b] 42 Then Jonathan said to David, “Go in peace, since both of us have sworn in the name of the Lord, saying, ‘The Lord shall be between me and you, and between my descendants and your descendants, forever.’” He got up and left; and Jonathan went into the city.[c]

Jonathan shooting three arrows to warn David, Frederic Leighton, 1st Baron Leighton of Stretton (Wikipedia)

Midday Lesson

Lasting loyalty and personal self-sacrifice

“At the beginning of each month, the Israelites gathered to celebrate the new moon festival [v. 5]. While this was mainly a time to be enjoyed, it was also a way to dedicate the next month to God. Other nations had celebrations during the full moon and worshiped the moon itself. The Israelites, however, celebrated their festival at the time of the new moon, when the moon was not visible in the sky. This was an added precaution against false worship. Nothing in the creation is to be worshiped—only the Creator.” [10]

“[G]ood will also goes together with generosity, for generosity really starts from it, seeing that the habit of giving comes after the desire to give. But generosity may be distinguished from good will. For where generosity is lacking, there good may abide—the parent, as it were, of all in common, uniting and binding friendships together. It is faithful in counsel, joyful in times of prosperity, and in times of sorrow sad. So it happens that any one trusts himself to the counsels of a man of good will rather than to those of a wise one, as David did. For he, though he was the more farseeing, agreed to the counsels of Jonathan [vv. 12-13]” (St. Ambrose, Duties of the Clergy 1.32.167). [11]

“Jonathan asked David to keep a promise to treat his children kindly in the future [v. 15]. Years later David took great pains to fulfill this promise: He invited Jonathan’s son Mephibosheth into his palace to live (2 Sam 9).” [12]

“Who would not have loved [David], when they saw how dear he was to his friends [see vv. 41-42]? For as he truly loved his friends, so he thought that he was loved as much in return by his own friends. . . . [C]hildren loved him more than their parents. Therefore Saul was very angry and strove to strike Jonathan his son with a spear because he thought that David’s friendship held a higher place in his esteem than either filial piety or a father’s authority,” (St. Ambrose, Duties of the Clergy 2.7.36). [13]

“Of all the heroes of the Bible, there are few as good and true and faithful as Jonathan.

King Saul’s eldest son was a mighty warrior and one of the bravest men who ever lived.

He had defeated the Ammonites and the Philistines. Once he attacked a Philistine out-

post on a cliff top at Michmash with only his armor-bearer, killing twenty men at once and

sending the entire garrison running for their lives. He could do this because he believed

wholeheartedly that God would be faithful and deliver him.” [14]

“Yet Jonathan knew that it was David, not he, whom God had chosen to succeed his

father. Instead of being jealous or angry, Jonathan became David’s best friend. He protected

David when King Saul turned against him and tried to kill him. In doing so he brought Saul’s

wrath upon himself. Yet Jonathan did not abandon his father either. He remained a loyal son

and valiant captain in his army, eventually dying at his father’s side in battle.” [15]

“David and Jonathan’s friendship displays lasting loyalty and personal self-sacrifice (cf Pr 17:17). Give thanks to the Lord for the friends He has blessed you with and the wonderful way He has protected you. Pray to grow in the grace of giving thanks. By grace, God treats all of us infinitely better than we deserve. • ‘By grace I’m saved, grace free and boundless; My soul , believe and doubt it not.’ Amen.” [16]


Lord, in your mercy 

      hear our prayer. 

Lord, hear us. 

      Lord, graciously hear us.

Eventide Prayers

HAVING passed over this day, I give thanks unto thee, O Lord. 

     The evening draweth nigh; make thou it comfortable. 

     As the day hath its evening, so also hath the life of man: the evening of life is old age. Old age hath taken hold of me; make this also comfortable. 

     Cast me not off in the time of old age; forsake me not when my strength faileth Psalm lxxi. 9.      

     Even to mine old age be thou he, and even to hoar hairs carry me; do thou make, and do thou bear; thou shalt carry and deliver me, O Lord.—Isaiah xlvi. 4.

  • Lancelot Andrews [17]
For Protection.

Incline Thine ear unto me, O Lord, and harken unto my words. Shew Thy marvelous loving-kindness, Thou at the Savior of them that put their trust in Thee. Keep me as the apple of Thine eye, and hide me under the shadow of Thine wings, even for Jesus Christ His sake. Amen.

  • William Laud, Abp of Canterbury [18]

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit: as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen. 

Alleluia!

Short Verse

When that day comes, YAHWEH will start his threshing from the course of the River to the Torrent of Egypt, and you will be gathered one by one, Israelites! When that day comes, the great ram’s-horn will be sounded, and those lost in Assyria will come, and those banished to Egypt, and they will worship YAHWEH on the holy mountain, in Jerusalem. 

Isaiah 27:12–13

Eventide Reading

Acts 11:19-26, Christians in Antioch

19 Now those who were scattered because of the persecution that took place over Stephen traveled as far as Phoenicia, Cyprus, and Antioch, and they spoke the word to no one except Jews. 20 But among them were some men of Cyprus and Cyrene who, on coming to Antioch, spoke to the Hellenists[a] also, proclaiming the Lord Jesus. 21 The hand of the Lord was with them, and a great number became believers and turned to the Lord. 22 News of this came to the ears of the church in Jerusalem, and they sent Barnabas to Antioch. 23 When he came and saw the grace of God, he rejoiced, and he exhorted them all to remain faithful to the Lord with steadfast devotion; 24 for he was a good man, full of the Holy Spirit and of faith. And a great many people were brought to the Lord. 25 Then Barnabas went to Tarsus to look for Saul, 26 and when he had found him, he brought him to Antioch. So it was that for an entire year they met with[b] the church and taught a great many people, and it was in Antioch that the disciples were first called “Christians.”

Eventide Lesson

The first place where believers were called Christians

The nomer Hellenists, v. 20, “refers to actual Greeks, not to Hellenistic Jews (contrast 6:1). The Church in Antioch was instrumental in bringing numerous Gentiles to the Lord Jesus.” [19] “In Antioch, Christianity was launched on its worldwide mission and there the believers aggressively preached to the Gentiles (non-Jews who did not worship God). Philip had preached in Samaria, but the Samaritans were part Jewish (8:5); Peter had preached to Cornelius, but he already worshiped God (10:2). Believers who were scattered after the outbreak of persecution in Jerusalem spread the gospel to other Jews in the lands they fled to (11:19). The seeds of this missionary work had been sown after Stephen’s death. At this time, the believers began actively sharing the gospel with Gentiles.” [20]

“Barnabas presents a wonderful example of how to help new Christians [vv. 22-26]. He demonstrated strong faith; he ministered joyfully with kindness and encouragement; he taught new be believers further lessons about God (see 9:26-30). Remember Barnabas when you see new believers, and think of ways to help them grow in their faith.” [21]

“With the exception of Jerusalem [v. 22], Antioch of Syria played a more important role in the early church than any other city. After Rome and Alexandria, Antioch was the largest city in the Roman world. In Antioch, the first Gentile church was founded, and there the believers were first called Christians (11:26). Paul used the city as his home base during his missionary journeys. Antioch was the center of worship for several pagan cults that promoted sexual immorality and other forms of evil common to pagan religions. It was also a vital commercial center—the gateway to the eastern world. Antioch was a key city both to Rome and to the early church.” [22]

“Two key truths are revealed in Barnabas being sent out to Antioch [v. 22]: (1) an apostle is sent, but does not work in isolation from the Church (v. 23); and (2) the church in Antioch needed the seal of apostolic authority to be integrated into the universal Church.” [23]

“Saul had been sent to his home in Tarsus for protection after his conversion had caused an uproar among the Jewish leaders in Jerusalem (9:26-30). He stayed there for several years before Barnabas brought him to help the church at Antioch [v. 25].” [24] “In seeking help Barnabas reveals humility, a recognition of his own limitations, and his communion with and dependence on the other apostles.” [25]

“Two key elements of early church practice [v. 26] included (1) the eucharistic assembly and (2) the teaching of the gospel. That the disciples were first called Christians in Antioch is more than just historical fact. It demonstrates that Christ’s command to preach the gospel among the Gentiles was first fully realized in Antioch. ‘It was there for the first time that men were accounted worthy of that name,’” (St. John Chrysostom). [26]

“The young church at Antioch was a curious mixture of Jews (who spoke Greek or Aramaic) and Gentiles. It is significant that this is the first place where the believers were called Christians (or “Christ-ones”), because all they had in common was Christ—not race, culture, or even language. Christ’s love crosses all boundaries and can unify all people.” [27]

“Barnabas and Saul stayed at Antioch for a full year, teaching the new believers. They could have left for other cities, but they saw the importance of follow-through and training. Have you helped someone believe in Christ? Spend time teaching and encouraging that person. Are you a new believer? Remember, you are just beginning your Christian life. Your faith needs to grow and mature through consistent Bible study and teaching.” [28]

Concluding Prayer of the Church

Lord, keep us safe this night, Secure from all our fears; May angels guard us while we sleep, Till morning light appears.

  • John Leland, 1754-1841 [29]

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit: as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen. 

Alleluia!


Citations:

[1] Andrewes, Lancelot. The Private Devotions and Manual for the Sick of Launcelot Andrews (Kindle ed., p. 210). Kindle Edition. 

[2] Papavassiliou, V. (2014). Morning Prayers. In The ancient faith prayer book (Kindle ed., p. 14). Chesterton, IN: Ancient Faith Publishing.

[3] Episcopal Church. (1979). Collects. In The Book of common prayer: And administration of the sacraments, and other rites and ceremonies of the church, according to the use of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States of America: Together with the psalter, or, Psalms of David (pp. 173). New York, NY: Church Publishing Incorporated.

[4] The hymnal 1982: According to the use of the Episcopal Church 203. o sons and daughters, let us sing. (n.d.). Retrieved April 04, 2021, from https://hymnary.org/hymn/EH1982/203

[5] House, C. P. (2009). Psalms. In HOLY BIBLE: The lutheran study bible (p. 979). St. Louis, MO: Concordia Publishing HSE.

[6] Academic Community of St. Athanasius Academy of Orthodox Theology (2008). Psalms. In The Orthodox study Bible (p. 792). Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson.

[7] House, C. P. (2009). Hebrew Names for Psalms [Image/Chart]. In HOLY BIBLE: The lutheran study bible (p. 841). St. Louis, MO: Concordia Publishing HSE

[8] Andrewes, Lancelot. The Private Devotions and Manual for the Sick of Launcelot Andrews (Kindle ed., p. 408). Kindle Edition. 

[9] Cobb, D., & Olsen, D. A. (2014). Daily Prayers. In Saint Augustine’s prayer book: A book of devotions (Kindle ed., p. 53). Cincinnati, OH: Forward Movement.

[10] Tyndale House Publishers. (2012). 1 Samuel. In Chronological life application study Bible (Kindle ed., p. 6044). Carol Stream, IL: Tyndale House Pub.

[11] Ambrose. (2019). In Ancient faith study Bible (Kindle ed., p. 1586). Nashville: Holman Bible.

[12] Tyndale House Publishers. (2012). 1 Samuel. In Chronological life application study Bible (Kindle ed., p. 6044). Carol Stream, IL: Tyndale House Pub.

[13] Ambrose. (2019). In Ancient faith study Bible (Kindle ed., p. 1587). Nashville: Holman Bible.

[14] Detwiler, G. (2020). Jonathan. In The ultimate bible character guide (p. 133). essay, Holman Reference. 

[15] Ibid. 14

[16] A., E. E. (2016). 1 Samuel. In The Lutheran study Bible: English standard version (Kindle ed., pp. 1959). Saint Louis: Concordia Publishing House.

[17] Andrewes, Lancelot. The Private Devotions and Manual for the Sick of Launcelot Andrews (Kindle ed., p. 2548). Kindle Edition. 

[18] LAUD, W. (1855). Monday Compline: For Protection. In The Private Devotions of Dr. William Laud, Archbishop of Canterbury and Martyr (Ebook ed., p. 8-9). London and Oxford: John Henry & Jas. Parker.

[19] Academic Community of St. Athanasius Academy of Orthodox Theology (2008). Acts. In The Orthodox study Bible (p. 1519). Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson.

[20] Tyndale House Publishers, Inc. (2013). Study Notes: Acts. In Life application study Bible: King James version (Kindle ed., p. 9286). Carol Stream, IL: Tyndale House.

[21] Ibid. 20, P. 9286-9287

[22] Ibid. 20, P. 9286

[23] Academic Community of St. Athanasius Academy of Orthodox Theology (2008). Acts. In The Orthodox study Bible (p. 1519). Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson.

[24] Tyndale House Publishers, Inc. (2013). Study Notes: Acts. In Life application study Bible: King James version (Kindle ed., p. 9287). Carol Stream, IL: Tyndale House.

[25] Academic Community of St. Athanasius Academy of Orthodox Theology (2008). Acts. In The Orthodox study Bible (p. 1519). Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson.

[26] Ibid. 25

[27] Tyndale House Publishers, Inc. (2013). Study Notes: Acts. In Life application study Bible: King James version (Kindle ed., p. 9287). Carol Stream, IL: Tyndale House.

[28] Ibid. 27, P. 9287-9288

[29] Kitch, A. E. (2004). Bedtime Prayers. In The Anglican family prayer book (Kindle ed., pp.212). Harrisburg, PA: Morehouse Pub.

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