Apr 8, 2022 Devotional Bible Study

April 8, 2022
Lent

Today’s Readings: 

  1. MORNING: Isaiah 54:9-10, God’s love is steadfast
    • Lesson: God’s promises are permanent
  2. MIDDAY: Leviticus 23:1-8, Sabbath and passover
    • Lesson: The chief theme of our worship
  3. EVENING: Luke 22:1-13, Jesus prepares for Passover with his disciples
    • Lesson: Zeal and spiritual understanding

Invitatory

The Lord is full of compassion and mercy: Come let us adore him.

Opening Prayer

O God, the light of the minds that know you, the life of the souls that love you, and the strength of the wills that serve you: Help us so to know you that we may truly love you, and so to love you that we may fully serve you, whom to serve is perfect freedom; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen. [1]

The Hymn

Poem by Sidney Lanier

Into the woods my Master went, 

Clean forspent, forspent; 

Into the woods my Master came, 

Forspent with love and shame. 

But the olives they were not blind to him. 

The little gray leaves were kind to him, 

The thorn tree had a mind to him, 

When into the woods he came. 

Out of the woods my Master went, 

And he was well content: 

Out of the woods my Master came, 

Content with death and shame. 

But the death and shame would woo him last, 

From under the trees they drew him last, 

’Twas on a tree they slew him last, 

When out of the woods he came. [2]


Morning Prayer

This is another day, O Lord. I know not what it will bring forth, but make me ready, Lord, for whatever it may be. If I am to stand up, help me to stand bravely. If I am to sit still, help me to sit quietly. If I am to lie low, help me to do it patiently. And if I am to do nothing, let me do it gallantly. Make these words more than words, and give me the Spirit of Jesus. Amen. [3]

Short Verse

Sanctify them by the truth; your word is truth.

John 17:17

Morning Reading

Isaiah 54:9-10, God’s love is steadfast

This is like the days of Noah to me:

    Just as I swore that the waters of Noah

    would never again go over the earth,

so I have sworn that I will not be angry with you

    and will not rebuke you.

10 

For the mountains may depart

    and the hills be removed,

but my steadfast love shall not depart from you,

    and my covenant of peace shall not be removed,

    says the Lord, who has compassion on you.

Morning Lesson

God’s promises are permanent

“The flood was a reversal of creation, destroying human and animal life, covering the plants and mountains, so that the earth returned to the watery chaos that existed before the second day of creation. Noah becomes, as it were, another Adam… After the flood, the Lord made an everlasting covenant with Noah and his descendants (Gn 9:9–11).” [4] “Unlike the world, God’s promises are permanent (cf 51:6; Ps 89:33–34; Mt 24:35).” [5] “The umbrella of this ‘covenant of peace’ is extended to non-Israelites. The Lord’s call to all nations is a recurring theme throughout Isaiah (e.g., 2:1–5; 11:10; 40:5; 42:6; 49:6; 53:12; 60:1–3).” [6]


Midday Prayer

O God, grant that we may desire you, and desiring you seek you, and seeking you find you, and finding you be satisfied in you for ever. Amen.

– Francis Xavier [7]

Short Verse

And Jesus said unto them, “Can the children of the bridechamber mourn, as long as the bridegroom is with them? but the days will come, when the bridegroom shall be taken from them, and then shall they fast.”

Matthew 9:15

Midday Reading

Leviticus 23:1-8, Sabbath and passover

1 The Lord spoke to Moses, saying: 2 Speak to the people of Israel and say to them: These are the appointed festivals of the Lord that you shall proclaim as holy convocations, my appointed festivals.

3 Six days shall work be done; but the seventh day is a sabbath of complete rest, a holy convocation; you shall do no work: it is a sabbath to the Lord throughout your settlements.

4 These are the appointed festivals of the Lord, the holy convocations, which you shall celebrate at the time appointed for them. 5 In the first month, on the fourteenth day of the month, at twilight,[a] there shall be a passover offering to the Lord, 6 and on the fifteenth day of the same month is the festival of unleavened bread to the Lord; seven days you shall eat unleavened bread. 7 On the first day you shall have a holy convocation; you shall not work at your occupations. 8 For seven days you shall present the Lord’s offerings by fire; on the seventh day there shall be a holy convocation: you shall not work at your occupations.

Midday Lesson

The chief theme of our worship

Chapter 23 “represents a liturgical calendar for the Israelites. All such festivals and Sabbaths prefigure Christ (Col 2:16–17). The life of Jesus Christ shapes the Christian liturgical calendar, granting rest not only for our weary bodies but also for our weary souls. • Lord, may we always see the life of Christ reflected in our service, since He comes near to us through His precious Word and Sacraments. Amen.” [8]

“Remembrance of God’s deliverance of the Israelites from Egypt was the most important component in their liturgical calendar. He made redemption the chief theme of their service. Jesus Christ, the Lamb of God, was slain on Good Friday as the Passover lambs were sacrificed. His sacrifice made redemption the chief theme of our worship too. • Blessed Redeemer, deliver us from all evil through Jesus Christ, our Paschal Lamb. Amen.” [9]


Eventide Prayer

Grant us, Lord, the lamp of charity which never fails, that it may burn in us and shed its light on those around us, and that by its brightness we may have a vision of that holy City, where dwells the true and never-failing Light, Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen. [10]

Short Verse

Now before the Feast of the Passover, when Jesus knew that his hour had come to depart out of this world to the Father, having loved his own who were in the world, he loved them to the end.

John 13:1

Jewish holidays: Passover Pesach matzah and a silver cup full of wine with a traditional blessing

Eventide Reading

Luke 22:1-13, Jesus prepares for Passover with his disciples

22 Now the festival of Unleavened Bread, which is called the Passover, was near. 2 The chief priests and the scribes were looking for a way to put Jesus[a] to death, for they were afraid of the people.

3 Then Satan entered into Judas called Iscariot, who was one of the twelve; 4 he went away and conferred with the chief priests and officers of the temple police about how he might betray him to them. 5 They were greatly pleased and agreed to give him money. 6 So he consented and began to look for an opportunity to betray him to them when no crowd was present.

The Preparation of the Passover

7 Then came the day of Unleavened Bread, on which the Passover lamb had to be sacrificed. 8 So Jesus[b] sent Peter and John, saying, “Go and prepare the Passover meal for us that we may eat it.” 9 They asked him, “Where do you want us to make preparations for it?” 10 “Listen,” he said to them, “when you have entered the city, a man carrying a jar of water will meet you; follow him into the house he enters 11 and say to the owner of the house, ‘The teacher asks you, “Where is the guest room, where I may eat the Passover with my disciples?”’ 12 He will show you a large room upstairs, already furnished. Make preparations for us there.” 13 So they went and found everything as he had told them; and they prepared the Passover meal.

Eventide Lesson

Zeal and spiritual understanding

“The Passover (Gr. Pascha) is the celebration of the destruction of the firstborn of Egypt and the deliverance of God’s people from bondage (Ex 12- 14). In remembrance of this, the Jews would slaughter an unblemished lamb and partake of it with unleavened bread. This prefigures Christ’s Passion, in which the only-begotten Son of God is slain in order to deliver His people from their bondage to sin and death, and then is raised to lead them into the eternal Kingdom. Thus, Pascha is the primary term by which we refer to the death and Resurrection of Christ, known in the West as Easter.” [11]

“Satan does not enter a man except by the man’s consent. The reason Satan chose Judas and none of the others is that Judas had a place for Satan in his heart, while the others did not. Luke’s mention of Judas being numbered among the twelve emphasizes the depth of the betrayal and shows that religious position is worthless if not accompanied by faith and virtue.” [12]

“Prompted by Satan, Judas negotiates the price for Jesus. The Lord would not have us compromise His purposes for earthly gain. When sin assails you, call on Jesus, who redeemed us, not with gold or silver, but with His holy, precious blood. • Lord, make us loyal to You above all. Amen.” [13]

“The term Passover (Gr. Pascha) can refer to the original event itself, the celebration of that event, the food that is eaten, or the lamb that is slain. According to the Fathers, Peter represents zeal and John represents spiritual understanding, the virtues with which we are to partake of the Lord’s Supper.” [14]

“Jesus directs His disciples in preparing the Passover meal. God foresees our needs and plans for our lives. He invites us to follow as He leads. He always arranges for our eternal welfare. • Praise to You, O Lord. You do all things well for us and our salvation! Grant us sincere hearts and willing feet. Amen.” [15]

Concluding Prayer of the Church

Keep watch, dear Lord, with those who work, or watch, or weep this night, and give your angels charge over those who sleep. Tend the sick, Lord Christ; give rest to the weary, bless the dying, soothe the suffering, pity the afflicted, shield the joyous; and all for your love’s sake. Amen. [16]


Citations:

[1] http://bcp2019.anglicanchurch.net/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/56-Occasional-Prayers.docx

[2] Tickle, P. (2006). March. In The divine hours: Prayers for Springtime (Kindle ed., vol. 2, p. 237). New York, NY: Image Books

[3] Episcopal Church. (1979). The Ministration of the Sick. In The Book of common prayer: And administration of the sacraments, and other rites and ceremonies of the church, according to the use of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States of America: Together with the psalter, or, Psalms of David (pp. 461). New York, NY: Church Publishing Incorporated.

[4] A., E. E. (2016). Isaiah. In The Lutheran study Bible: English standard version (Kindle ed., pp. 4814-4815). Saint Louis: Concordia Publishing House.

[5] Ibid. 4, P. 4815

[6] Ibid. 4, P. 4814

[7] http://bcp2019.anglicanchurch.net/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/56-Occasional-Prayers.docx

[8] A., E. E. (2016). Leviticus. In The Lutheran study Bible: English standard version (Kindle ed., pp. 1004). Saint Louis: Concordia Publishing House.

[9] Ibid. 8, P. 1004-1005

[10] Episcopal Church. (1979). Daily Office, Rite II. In The Book of common prayer: And administration of the sacraments, and other rites and ceremonies of the church, according to the use of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States of America: Together with the psalter, or, Psalms of David (pp. 110). New York, NY: Church Publishing Incorporated.

[11] Academic Community of St. Athanasius Academy of Orthodox Theology (2008). Luke. In The Orthodox study Bible (p. 1423). Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson.

[12] Ibid, 11

[13] A., E. E. (2016). Luke. In The Lutheran study Bible: English standard version (Kindle ed., pp. 1760). Saint Louis: Concordia Publishing House.

[14] Academic Community of St. Athanasius Academy of Orthodox Theology (2008). Luke. In The Orthodox study Bible (p. 1423). Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson.

[15] A., E. E. (2016). Luke. In The Lutheran study Bible: English standard version (Kindle ed., pp. 1761). Saint Louis: Concordia Publishing House.

[16] Episcopal Church. (1979). Daily Office, Rite II. In The Book of common prayer: And administration of the sacraments, and other rites and ceremonies of the church, according to the use of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States of America: Together with the psalter, or, Psalms of David (pp. 134). New York, NY: Church Publishing Incorporated.

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