Mar 26, 2022 Devotional Bible Study

March 26, 2022
Lent

Today’s Readings: 

  1. MORNING: Exodus 32:7-14, Moses begs forgiveness
    • Lesson: Bring others the message of God’s mercy.
  2. MIDDAY: Luke 15:1-10, Parables of a lost sheep and a lost coin
    • Lesson: The lost sheep and the lost coin
  3. EVENING: Lenten Self-Examination: On the Sin of Envy

Invocation

O Lord, open our lips 

and our mouth shall proclaim your praise. 

Hear our voice, O Lord, according to your faithful love, 

according to your judgment give us life.

Opening Prayer

May almighty God, who sent his Son into the world to save sinners, bring us his pardon and peace, now and for ever. All Amen. [1]

The Hymn

“Sing with Gladness” 

By John Ellerton

Lyrics:

Sing, you faithful, sing with gladness, wake your noblest, sweetest strain, 

With the praises of your Savior let his house resound again; 

Him let all your music honor, let your songs exalt his reign. 

Sing how he came forth from heaven, bowed himself to Bethlehem’s cave, 

Stooped to wear the servant’s vesture, bore the pain, the cross, the grave, 

Passed within the gates of darkness, thence his banished ones to save. 

So, he tasted death for mortals, he, of humankind the head, 

Sinless one, among the sinful, Prince of life, among the dead; 

Thus he wrought the full redemption, and the captor captive led. 

Now, on high, yet ever with us, from his Father’s throne the Son 

Rules and guides the world he ransomed, till the appointed work be done, 

Till he sees, renewed, perfected, all things gathered into one. [2]

Morning Prayer

(Fourth Century)

[3]

Short Verse

Remember me, O LORD, with the favor you have for your people,* and visit me with your saving help. 

Psalm 106:4

Morning Reading

Exodus 32:7-14, Moses begs forgiveness

7 The Lord said to Moses, “Go down at once! Your people, whom you brought up out of the land of Egypt, have acted perversely; 8 they have been quick to turn aside from the way that I commanded them; they have cast for themselves an image of a calf, and have worshiped it and sacrificed to it, and said, ‘These are your gods, O Israel, who brought you up out of the land of Egypt!’” 9 The Lord said to Moses, “I have seen this people, how stiff-necked they are. 10 Now let me alone, so that my wrath may burn hot against them and I may consume them; and of you I will make a great nation.”

11 But Moses implored the Lord his God, and said, “O Lord, why does your wrath burn hot against your people, whom you brought out of the land of Egypt with great power and with a mighty hand? 12 Why should the Egyptians say, ‘It was with evil intent that he brought them out to kill them in the mountains, and to consume them from the face of the earth’? Turn from your fierce wrath; change your mind and do not bring disaster on your people. 13 Remember Abraham, Isaac, and Israel, your servants, how you swore to them by your own self, saying to them, ‘I will multiply your descendants like the stars of heaven, and all this land that I have promised I will give to your descendants, and they shall inherit it forever.’” 14 And the Lord changed his mind about the disaster that he planned to bring on his people.

Morning Lesson

Bring others the message of God’s mercy.

“God was ready to destroy the whole nation because of their sin. But Moses pleaded for mercy, and God spared them. This is one of the countless examples in the Bible of God’s mercy. Although we deserve his anger, he is willing to forgive and restore us to himself. We can receive God’s forgiveness from sin by asking him. Like Moses, we can pray that he will forgive others and use us to bring them the message of his mercy.” [4]

“How could God relent? God did not change his mind in the same way that a parent decides not to discipline a child. Instead, God changed his behavior to remain consistent with his nature. When God first wanted to destroy the people, he was acting consistently with his justice. When Moses interceded for the people, God relented in order to act consistently with his mercy. God had often told the people that if they changed their ways, he would not condemn them. They changed, and God forgave them as he had promised.” [5]

Midday Prayer

(Second Century)
[6]

Short Verse

Who can overcome the world but the one who believes in the Son of God? 

I John 5:5

Midday Reading

Luke 15:1-10, Parables of a lost sheep and a lost coin

The Parable of the Lost Sheep

1 Now all the tax collectors and sinners were coming near to listen to him. 2 And the Pharisees and the scribes were grumbling and saying, “This fellow welcomes sinners and eats with them.”

3 So he told them this parable: 4 “Which one of you, having a hundred sheep and losing one of them, does not leave the ninety-nine in the wilderness and go after the one that is lost until he finds it? 5 When he has found it, he lays it on his shoulders and rejoices. 6 And when he comes home, he calls together his friends and neighbors, saying to them, ‘Rejoice with me, for I have found my sheep that was lost.’ 7 Just so, I tell you, there will be more joy in heaven over one sinner who repents than over ninety-nine righteous persons who need no repentance.

The Parable of the Lost Coin

8 “Or what woman having ten silver coins,[a] if she loses one of them, does not light a lamp, sweep the house, and search carefully until she finds it? 9 When she has found it, she calls together her friends and neighbors, saying, ‘Rejoice with me, for I have found the coin that I had lost.’ 10 Just so, I tell you, there is joy in the presence of the angels of God over one sinner who repents.”

Midday Lesson

The lost sheep and the lost coin

Today’s reading from Luke contains two parables: the parable of the lost sheep and the parable of the lost coin.

“Sharing a meal was a sign of friendship and reconciliation; thus, to the Pharisees, Christ appeared to be accepting of sinners. He used this opportunity to show that his mission is to call sinners to repentance, for which there is more reason to rejoice than there is over those who have never strayed from the faith.” [7]

In the first parable, “Jesus use[d] the devotion of a shepherd to illustrate God’s willingness to find the wayward sinner. God does not abandon us to our foolishness but seeks us out, calling us to repentance and to faith in the Gospel. • Bring us home, dear Lord, and let there be joy in heaven. Grant us daily repentance. Amen.” [8]

“The lost sheep represents the sinner, while God, [especially] the Son, is the shepherd (cf Ps 23; Is 40:11). The found sheep is every Christian, rescued and delivered by God. The neighbors are the saints and angels who rejoice together.” [9]

“Just as a shepherd gathers his scattered flock and seeks out those sheep who have been lost, Christ, the Good Shepherd, desires to call all his people together as one and to reconcile the wayward sinner back into the fold. As successors to the Apostles, the bishops—as well as the deacons and priests who assist them—are entrusted with the preeminent task of being good shepherds. However, every Christian is called to be a good shepherd to family members and friends, leading them always to Christ.” [10]

“In the second parable, the repentant sinner is like a coin. Unlike the wandering sheep, the coin is inanimate, emphasizing its complete helplessness. The neighbors represent the angels, who are invited to share the joy of God, for He has found something precious.” [11]

“The unrepentant sinner is like a coin lost in the darkness. Once lost, we have no more ability to find the Lord than the coin has to find its owner. Yet, the good news of Christ gives “light to those who sit in darkness and in the shadow of death” (1:79). • Thank You, merciful Lord, for seeking us when we had no power to seek You. Amen.” [12]

Eventide Prayer

(Fourth Century)
[13]

Short Verse

As soon as I heard these words I sat down and wept and mourned for days, and I continued fasting and praying before the God of heaven.

 Nehemiah 1:4

Pieter van der Heyden “Envy (Invidia)”
(source)

Eventide Reading

Lenten Self-Examination: On the Sin of Envy

(Excerpted from St. Augustine’s Prayer Book [14])

ENVY is dissatisfaction with our place in God’s order of creation, manifested in begrudging the gifts and vocations of others. 

  • Jealousy: Offense at others’ talents or success. Desire to control others so they are dependent on us. Belittling others. Inability or refusal to enjoy one’s own good fortune because someone else’s seems greater. Attacking another’s work or personality to foster one’s own position. Refusal to offer help and advice in order to see the other fail. 
  • Malice: False accusations, slander, backbiting, or gossip. Arousing, fostering, or organizing hostility toward others. Unnecessary or unhelpful criticism, even when true. Organizing and fostering division and resentment within the parish or other communities rather than honest, patient conversation. Deliberate annoyance of others. Teasing. Any acts of bullying. 
  • Contempt: Scorn of another’s virtue or ability, or of their shortcomings or failings. Prejudice against those we consider inferior, or who seem to consider us inferior. Ridicule of persons, institutions, or ideals.
“Envy”
By Giotto, 1306,
Scrovegni (Arena) Chapel, Padua, Italy
(source)

Concluding Prayer of the Church

*  I have set the Lord always before me. 

Because He is at my right hand, 

I shall not be shaken. 

I am placing my soul and my body 

under Thy guarding this night, O Christ. 

May Thy cross this night be shielding me. 

*  Into Your hands I commit my spirit; 

redeem me, O Lord, the God of Truth. 

Amen. [15]


Citations:

[1] Church House Publishing. (2005). Forms of Penitence. In Common worship: Daily prayer (pp. 126). 

[2] Tickle, P. (2006). March. In The divine hours: Prayers for Springtime (Kindle ed., vol. 2, p. 179). New York, NY: Image Books

[3] Potts, J. M. (2020). Fourth Century Prayers. In Prayers of the Early Church (Kindle, pp. 37). prayer. 

[4] Tyndale House Publishers. (2012). Exodus. In Chronological life application study Bible (Kindle ed., p. 5792). Carol Stream, IL: Tyndale House Pub.

[5] Ibid. 4

[6] Potts, J. M. (2020). Second Century Prayers. In Prayers of the Early Church (Kindle, pp. 22). prayer.

[7] Cole, J. (Ed.). (2015). Luke. In Didache Bible: With commentaries based on the Catechism of the Catholic Church (Kindle ed., p. 3135). Downers Grove, IL: Midwest Theological Forum,, Ignatius Press.

[8] A., E. E. (2016). Luke. In The Lutheran study Bible: English standard version (Kindle ed., pp. 7482). Saint Louis: Concordia Publishing House.

[9] Ibid. 8, P. 7481

[10] Cole, J. (Ed.). (2015). Luke. In Didache Bible: With commentaries based on the Catechism of the Catholic Church (Kindle ed., p. 3135). Downers Grove, IL: Midwest Theological Forum,, Ignatius Press.

[11] A., E. E. (2016). Luke. In The Lutheran study Bible: English standard version (Kindle ed., pp. 7482). Saint Louis: Concordia Publishing House.

[12] Ibid. 11, P. 7483

[13] Potts, J. M. (2020). Fourth Century Prayers. In Prayers of the Early Church (Kindle, pp. 43). prayer. 

[14] Cobb, D., & Olsen, D. A. (2014). Saint Augustine’s prayer book: A book of devotions (Kindle ed., p. 96). Cincinnati, OH: Forward Movement.

[15] The Northumbria Community. (2015). Daily Prayer: Compline. In Celtic Daily Prayer (Kindle ed., p. 92355). London: HarperCollins.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

Create your website with WordPress.com
Get started
%d bloggers like this: