November 26 Devotional (2021)

November 26, 2021
Advent

Today’s Readings: 

  1. Psalm 25:1-10 , To you I lift up my soul
  2. Nehemiah 9:5-25, Remembering the exodus
    • Lesson: The prayer of Ezra
  3. 1 Thessalonians 5:1-22, Rejoice, pray, give thanks
    • Lesson: Final instructions & the Second Coming of Christ

Invitatory

Our King and Savior now draws near: Come, let us adore him.

Opening Prayer

You, Lord Almighty, have created all things for your Name’s sake, and given food and drink to all people for their enjoyment, that they might give thanks to you; and on us you have bestowed spiritual food and drink, and eternal life through your Son. To you be glory forever. Remember, O Lord, your church. Deliver it from all evil and perfect it in your love. Sanctify it and gather it together into your Kingdom which you have prepared for it. For yours is the power and the glory for ever and ever. Amen. [1]

Intercession

For those in the Armed Forces of our Country

Almighty God, we commend to your gracious care and keeping all the men and women of our armed forces at home and abroad. Defend them day by day with your heavenly grace; strengthen them in their trials and temptations; give them courage to face the perils which beset them; and grant them a sense of your abiding presence wherever they may be; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen. [2]

Hymn

“Amazing Grace”

Invocation

O Lord open thou my lips 

And my mouth shall declare thy praise. 

O God come to my assistance;

O Lord, make haste to help me.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit: as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Morning Prayer

We praise you, O God, with gladness and humility for all the joys of life, for health and strength, for the love of friends, for work to do and play to recreate us. We thank you for the adventure of life. Above all, we thank you for your gift of Jesus Christ our Lord, for the blessings that have come to us through his body the church. Help us to show our thankfulness, not only with our lips, but in our lives, always endeavoring to do what shall please you. Amen. [3]

Short Verse

“Lord, make me according to thy heart.”

Brother Lawrence

Morning Reading

Psalm 25:1-10 , To you I lift up my soul

To you, O Lord, I lift up my soul.

O my God, in you I trust;

do not let me be put to shame;

do not let my enemies exult over me.

Do not let those who wait for you be put to shame;

let them be ashamed who are wantonly treacherous.

Make me to know your ways, O Lord;

teach me your paths.

Lead me in your truth, and teach me,

for you are the God of my salvation;

for you I wait all day long.

Be mindful of your mercy, O Lord, and of your steadfast love,

for they have been from of old.

Do not remember the sins of my youth or my transgressions;

according to your steadfast love remember me,

for your goodness’ sake, O Lord!

Good and upright is the Lord;

therefore he instructs sinners in the way.

He leads the humble in what is right,

and teaches the humble his way.

All the paths of the Lord are steadfast love and faithfulness,

for those who keep his covenant and his decrees.

Morning Benediction

May Almighty God, by whose providence our Savior Christ came among us in great humility, sanctify me with the light of his blessing and set me free from all sin. Amen. [51]


Invocation

O Lord open thou my lips 

And my mouth shall declare thy praise. 

O God come to my assistance;

O Lord, make haste to help me.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit: as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Midday Prayer

O God, the giver of all good gifts, we thank you for all the blessings we have. Give us al- ways contented minds, cheerful hearts, and ready wills, so that we may spend and be spent in the service of others, after the ex- ample of him who gave his life as a ransom for many, our Lord and Master, Jesus Christ. Amen. [4]

Short Verse

O Lamb of God, that takes away the sins of the world, have mercy upon me. 

O Lamb of God, that takes away the sins of the world, have mercy upon me. 

O Lamb of God, that takes away the sins of the world, grant me your peace.

The return from exile is depicted in this woodcut for Die Bibel in Bildern, 1860, by Julius Schnorr von Carolsfeld.

Midday Reading

Nehemiah 9:5-25, Remembering the exodus

 “Blessed be your glorious name, and may it be exalted above all blessing and praise. 6 You alone are the Lord. You made the heavens, even the highest heavens, and all their starry host, the earth and all that is on it, the seas and all that is in them. You give life to everything, and the multitudes of heaven worship you.

7 “You are the Lord God, who chose Abram and brought him out of Ur of the Chaldeans and named him Abraham. 8 You found his heart faithful to you, and you made a covenant with him to give to his descendants the land of the Canaanites, Hittites, Amorites, Perizzites, Jebusites and Girgashites. You have kept your promise because you are righteous.

9 “You saw the suffering of our ancestors in Egypt; you heard their cry at the Red Sea.  10 You sent signs and wonders against Pharaoh, against all his officials and all the people of his land, for you knew how arrogantly the Egyptians treated them. You made a name for yourself, which remains to this day. 11 You divided the sea before them, so that they passed through it on dry ground, but you hurled their pursuers into the depths, like a stone into mighty waters. 12 By day you led them with a pillar of cloud, and by night with a pillar of fire to give them light on the way they were to take.

13 “You came down on Mount Sinai; you spoke to them from heaven. You gave them regulations and laws that are just and right, and decrees and commands that are good. 14 You made known to them your holy Sabbath and gave them commands, decrees and laws through your servant Moses. 15 In their hunger you gave them bread from heaven and in their thirst you brought them water from the rock; you told them to go in and take possession of the land you had sworn with uplifted hand to give them.

16 “But they, our ancestors, became arrogant and stiff-necked, and they did not obey your commands. 17 They refused to listen and failed to remember the miracles you performed among them. They became stiff-necked and in their rebellion appointed a leader in order to return to their slavery. But you are a forgiving God, gracious and compassionate, slow to anger and abounding in love. Therefore you did not desert them, 18 even when they cast for themselves an image of a calf and said, ‘This is your god, who brought you up out of Egypt,’ or when they committed awful blasphemies.

19 “Because of your great compassion you did not abandon them in the wilderness. By day the pillar of cloud did not fail to guide them on their path, nor the pillar of fire by night to shine on the way they were to take. 20 You gave your good Spirit to instruct them. You did not withhold your manna from their mouths, and you gave them water for their thirst. 21 For forty years you sustained them in the wilderness; they lacked nothing, their clothes did not wear out nor did their feet become swollen.

22 “You gave them kingdoms and nations, allotting to them even the remotest frontiers. They took over the country of Sihon c king of Heshbon and the country of Og king of Bashan. 23 You made their children as numerous as the stars in the sky, and you brought them into the land that you told their parents to enter and possess. 24 Their children went in and took possession of the land. You subdued before them the Canaanites, who lived in the land; you gave the Canaanites into their hands, along with their kings and the peoples of the land, to deal with them as they pleased. 25 They captured fortified cities and fertile land; they took possession of houses filled with all kinds of good things, wells already dug, vineyards, olive groves and fruit trees in abundance. They ate to the full and were well-nourished; they reveled in your great goodness.

Passage continued tomorrow.

Midday Lesson

The prayer of Ezra

“The prayer of Ezra [vv. 6-38] follows the same biblical pattern of praise, remembrance for God’s works, and petition. The same pattern is followed in the Eucharistic prayers of the Divine Liturgy.” [5]

Verse 6 begins, You alone are the LORD. “The reference here is to the personal name of the God of Israel, Yahweh. Since no other god claims the name Yahweh, this should be rendered to convey that Yahweh stands alone—in a class by himself. The description that follows in the prayer (vv. 6–37) enumerates the unique acts of Yahweh that distinguish him from other gods. Though the prayer begins with acts of creation that other peoples would attribute to other gods, most of the list deals with the acts Yahweh performed on behalf of his covenant people Israel.” [6]

“The importance of the name of God can scarcely be overestimated. This psalm is solidly based on the theology of the Law (the books of Moses) as would be expected following the three-week reading of the Scriptures (8:1, 2). Thus this poem’s exaltation of the Lord’s name is based on God’s own revelation of His name recorded in the Book of Exodus (see Ex. 3:14). The prophet Isaiah also praised the Lord’s “glorious name” (Is. 63:14).” [7]

“One of the fundamental teachings of Scripture is that God is not one among many; He alone is the living God (see Deut. 6:4)… God alone has made all things, and He alone preserves all things. Therefore, worship is due Him. The first section of this psalm (vv. 5, 6) establishes the mood for the whole poem: God is incomparable (see Num. 23:8, 9; Deut. 4:32–40; Ps. 113:4–6).” [8]

Verse 7 begins, You are the LORD God. “The word order of the Hebrew text is striking: ‘You are He, Yahweh (the) God.’ The use of the definite article on the word God marks Him as ‘the true God.’” [9]

“The story of the election of Abraham begins in Gen. 12:1–3. The point here [in verses 7 and 8] is to emphasize God’s grace… None of the people of biblical history was without sin except Jesus. Still, there were some whose faithfulness to God was constant. Among them were Abraham and Sarah (see Heb. 11). The subsequent history of the people of Israel was not marked by the steady faithfulness seen in Abraham, much to the displeasure of the Lord. The Promised Land, the land of the Canaanites, was populated by diverse groups of people who had all lost their right to the land because of their sinfulness (see Gen. 15:18–21; Ex. 3:8, 17; 23:23; 33:2; Deut. 7:1; Josh. 3:10).” [10]

As verse 8 tells us, God had done what He had promised. “This is the essence of the psalm. God’s faithfulness to His people cannot be challenged. You are righteous: One of the greatest reasons to celebrate the character of God is His conformity to His own standard of perfection (v. 33).” [11]

“The Book of Exodus tells about the plight of the Israelites in Egypt and their complaint to the Lord for deliverance. It then speaks of God’s mercy in His response to the people’s need.” [12] Verse 9 “suggests that before the people expressed their hurt, the Lord was already aware of their troubles.” [13]

“The signs and wonders [v. 10] were the ten plagues of Ex. 7–12. These great acts of God were directed primarily against Pharaoh. acted proudly: In Ex. 18:11, Jethro, the father-in-law of Moses, used this same phrase to describe the presumptuous actions of the Egyptians. It was the proud actions of the Egyptians that brought God’s judgment on them.” [14]

You divided the sea (verse 11) “refers to God’s acts of deliverance at the Red Sea (see Ex. 14; 15). Note the simile of Pharaoh’s troops sinking as a stone (compare Ex. 15:5).” [15] 

“The continued presence of God in the lives of His people was indicated by [the cloudy pillar and the pillar of fire (v. 12)] (see Ex. 13:21, 22; Num. 10:11, 34; Deut. 1:33).” [16]

“The significance of the Sabbath in God’s law for Israel is celebrated [in verse 14] (see Ex. 20:8–11; 23:10–13; 31:12–18). By the hand of Moses: The Law came from the Lord, but it was given by the agency of Moses (see John 1:17).” [17]

In verse 15, “the gifts of bread, or manna (see Ex. 16:9–35), and water (see Ex. 17:1–7) demonstrated God’s care for His people in their journey to the Promised Land.” [18]

The words, But they (v. 16) “stand in shocking contrast to the description of God’s actions in vv. 9–15. The sin of the Israelites was that they acted proudly—that is, they behaved toward God in the same way that the people of Egypt had behaved toward them. The primary reference here is to the rebellion of Israel against the Lord at Kadesh (see Num. 13; 14). The people’s rebellion went so far that they appointed a leader to take them back to Egypt.” [19] The words, But You (v. 17) “contrast the words ‘But they’ at the beginning of v. 16 (see Ex. 34:6).” [20] 

“Seeing how God continued to be with his people [vv. 16-21] shows that his patience is amazing! In spite of our repeated failings, pride, and stubbornness, he is always ready to forgive (Neh 9:17), and his Spirit is always ready to instruct (Neh 9:20). Realizing the extent of God’s forgiveness helps us forgive those who fail us, even ‘seventy times seven’ if necessary (Matt 18:21-22).” [21]

In verses 18-21, “the poet describes the faithfulness of God to the Israelites in the wilderness despite their wretched behavior. Molded calf is a reference to the act of rebellion described in Ex. 32. Manifold mercies describes deep feelings like those of a mother for her child. You did not forsake them is repeated from v. 17. God would have been justified in abandoning His people because of their extreme sinfulness and wicked rebellion; yet He was compelled by His character not to do so… God not only gave gifts to His people, He made Himself known in their midst.” [22]

“The wilderness experience (see Deut. 2:7) is viewed in two ways in the Bible: (1) as a period of prolonged punishment because of rebellion; and (2) as a period of continued mercy because of God’s unchanging character… God’s provisions were daily experiences of divine miracles (see Deut. 8:4; 29:5).” [23]

In verses 22-25, “the poet describes the mercies of God in Israel’s conquest of the Promised Land and in God’s continuing provision for them… The Bible celebrates the conquest of the land east of the Jordan, as well as the conquest of Canaan itself… The miraculous growth of the people is described in this familiar hyperbole (see Gen. 15:5; 22:17). the people went in: The conquest of the land as described in the Book of Joshua is indicated here.” [24]

“With few exceptions, the people of Israel conquered the inhabitants of Canaan in such a way that they were able to move into the Canaanites’ undamaged homes and cities. The Israelites were also able to enjoy crops and wells for which they did not have to work. All of this is testimony to God’s great goodness.” [25]

“Many prayers and speeches in the Bible include a long summary of Israel’s history because individuals did not have their own copies of the Bible as we do today. This summary of God’s past works reminded the people of their great heritage and God’s promises.” [26]

“Remembering our personal history can certainly help us to avoid repeating our mistakes so that we can serve God better. Reviewing our past helps us understand how to improve our behavior. It shows us the pattern to our spiritual growth. Learn from your past so that you will become the kind of person God wants you to be.” [27]

Midday Benediction

May I, who rejoice in the first Advent of our Redeemer, at his second Advent be rewarded with unending life. Amen. [52]


Invocation

O Lord open thou my lips 

And my mouth shall declare thy praise. 

O God come to my assistance;

O Lord, make haste to help me.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit: as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Eventide Prayer

We give thanks to you, O Father, for the holy Name which you have made to dwell in our hearts; and for the knowledge, faith, and immortality, which you have given to us through Jesus your Son. To you be glory forever. Amen. [28]

Short Verse

Be open to the night… 

Pray with open hand, not with clenched fist…

Lord Dunsany
Icon of the Second Coming. Greek, ca. 1700 A.D.

Eventide Reading

1 Thessalonians 5:1-22, Rejoice, pray, give thanks

1 Now concerning the times and the seasons, brothers, you have no need to have anything written to you. 2 For you yourselves are fully aware that the day of the Lord will come like a thief in the night. 3 While people are saying, “There is peace and security,” then sudden destruction will come upon them as labor pains come upon a pregnant woman, and they will not escape. 4 But you are not in darkness, brothers, for that day to surprise you like a thief. 5 For you are all children of light, children of the day. We are not of the night or of the darkness. 6 So then let us not sleep, as others do, but let us keep awake and be sober. 7 For those who sleep, sleep at night, and those who get drunk, are drunk at night. 8 But since we belong to the day, let us be sober, having put on the breastplate of faith and love, and for a helmet the hope of salvation. 9 For God has not destined us for wrath, but to obtain salvation through our Lord Jesus Christ, 10 who died for us so that whether we are awake or asleep we might live with him. 11 Therefore encourage one another and build one another up, just as you are doing.

12 We ask you, brothers, to respect those who labor among you and are over you in the Lord and admonish you, 13 and to esteem them very highly in love because of their work. Be at peace among yourselves. 14 And we urge you, brothers, admonish the idle, encourage the fainthearted, help the weak, be patient with them all. 15 See that no one repays anyone evil for evil, but always seek to do good to one another and to everyone. 16 Rejoice always, 17 pray without ceasing, 18 give thanks in all circumstances; for this is the will of God in Christ Jesus for you. 19 Do not quench the Spirit. 20 Do not despise prophecies, 21 but test everything; hold fast what is good. 22 Abstain from every form of evil.

Eventide Lesson

Final instructions & the Second Coming of Christ

“Built on the Aegean Sea, Thessalonica was the most prominent city in the Roman province of Macedonia and served as a naval and commercial center. While many of the early churches were composed primarily of Jews who believed in Christ, the Thessalonian believers were mostly Gentiles, former idol worshippers (2:9). They experienced persecution by fellow citizens, stirred up by the Jews (1:6; 2:14; Acts 17:5-9), and had difficulty adhering to Christian values in a pagan setting.” [29]

“First Thessalonians contributes to our understanding of the second coming of Christ. Paul wrote to correct some misunderstandings of this doctrine, and in the process he showed us that Christ’s return gives us true hope. First Thessalonians and 1 Corinthians (chap. 15) are the only books that explicitly mention that Christians who are alive at Christ’s return will be changed and will meet Christ in the air without dying.” [30]

In the first portion of today’s passage, verses 1-11, Paul addressed a problem amongst the Christians in Thessalonica. 

“The Thessalonian Christians had been speculating about the return of the Lord and making predictions. Paul tells them you have no need (v. 1) for that kind of information (indeed, it is not available!). Does a thief in the night (v. 2) announce his coming? The disciples had gotten the same kind of answers to their questions on the Second Coming from Christ Himself (Mt 24:36; Acts 1:6, 7).” [31]

“Paul again echoes Jesus (Mt 24:43; Lk 12:38–39), as do other early Christian writers (2Pe 3:10; Rev 3:3; 16:15). The Biblical prophets warned of the day of the Lord; they also viewed earlier judgments through its prism, but foresaw an ultimate time when God would judge all peoples (e.g., Eze 30:3; Joel 3:14).” [32]

Verse 3 says, While people are saying, “There is peace and security,” then sudden destruction will come upon them as labor pains come upon a pregnant woman, and they will not escape. “Emperors claimed that their military exploits had brought ‘peace and safety’ to the empire; Paul’s critics could interpret Paul as despising such claims here (something interpreted as disrespect to the emperor could stir persecution; cf. Ac 17:7)… False prophets announcing peace helped lead to Jerusalem’s fall to Babylon (Jer 6:14; 8:11; 14:13); false prophets would later predict God’s deliverance even immediately before Jerusalem’s destruction in AD 70.” [33]

“Biblical prophets often used labor pains [v. 3] to depict intense suffering (e.g., Isa 26:17–18; 42:14; Jer 4:31; 6:24; 13:21; 22:23), appropriate also for the day of the Lord (Isa 13:6–8). Many Jewish people expected final labor pains as the present order prepared to birth a new age; they often listed various tribulations they expected to characterize it. Here Paul speaks not of gradual tribulations (cf. Mk 13:7–8; Ro 8:22) but of sudden destruction.” [34]

The day of the Lord will come like a thief in the night. “Thieves usually broke in at night. Sometimes commentators contrast the unexpected end of the age in vv. 1–2 with preceding signs in 2Th 2:2–4, but the tension exists also in other Jewish texts about the end time. The point here is that the wicked will be caught unprepared (v. 3), but not so the righteous (v. 4).” [35] “And suppose we know the end; what is this to us? Christians are called not to set dates but to make themselves ready to meet the Lord by being watchful and sober (v. 6). Our place is to be ceaselessly aware of the primacy of God’s Kingdom and to have full control over our spiritual faculties.” [36]

“Some radical Jews (see the Dead Sea Scrolls) considered their own group ‘children of light’ [v. 5] and everyone else ‘children of darkness’; many people used light or day to represent good and night or darkness to represent evil.” [37]

“Do not place your confidence in your youth, nor think that you have a very fixed term of life, ‘For the day of the Lord comes as a thief in the night.’ On this account he has made our end invisible, so that we might demonstrate clearly our diligence and forethought. Do you not see men taken away prematurely day after day? On this account a certain one admonishes, ‘Don’t delay in turning to the Lord, and don’t put things off from day to day,’ lest at any time, while you delay, you are destroyed. Let the old man keep this admonition; let the young man heed this advice. Indeed, are you in insecurity, and are you rich, and do you abound in wealth, and does no affliction happen to you? Still hear what Paul says: ‘When they say peace and safety, then sudden destruction comes upon them.’ Affairs change often. We are not masters of our end,’ (St. John Chrysostom). [38]

“After describing the future glory of those who have died in Christ, Paul now proceeds to tell the Thessalonians about the coming Day of Judgment in which the Lord will give His final verdict. Let us walk in holiness and righteousness so that we may not be ashamed when our Lord appears to judge our work. The Lord who has chosen us for salvation and died for us will be on our side on the final Day of Judgment. • Lord, help us to recognize that there is a Day of Judgment for us. May the work and righteousness of our Lord Jesus Christ be our defense when You come to judge the living and the dead. Amen.” [39]

In the second portion of today’s passage, verses 12-22, St. Paul continues in admonishing the Christians in Thessalonica, redirecting their focus from theorizing amongst themselves about that which none can possibly know – when Christ will return – back to focusing on living as faithful Christians in unity and fellowship. 

*Note: Verse 12 begins with the word “we,” because Paul’s letter “also mentions Silvanus (Silas) and Timothy. They were co-workers with Paul in establishing the church in Thessalonica on [Paul’s] second missionary journey (Acts 17:1-9).” [40]

“Writers on moral subjects often listed exhortations in a series without directly connecting all of them. Paul’s exhortations in this case do apparently exhibit a sort of loose structure, however: honoring leaders (vv. 12–13), helping others (vv. 14–15), prayer and thanksgiving (vv. 16–18) and prophecy (vv. 19–22).” [41]

“The Greek term for over you  [v. 12] has a liturgical connotation. It refers to the leader of the congregation in the eucharistic assembly… In a healthy church [with healthy, trustworthy leadership], the people recognize the pastor as their leader and willingly follow his admonition” and advisement. [42] “Ancient leadership was often hierarchical and social rank demanded honor; among Christians leadership was ideally servanthood, but it merited deep appreciation, respect and cooperation.” [43]

“When is it proper to return evil for evil [v. 15]? From the Sermon on the Mount (Mt 5:44) to the end of the NT, the answer is, ‘Never.’” [44]

“In Paul’s writings, words such as rejoice, always (v. 16), without ceasing or ‘constantly’ (v. 17), and give thanks (v. 18) refer primarily to prayer. The spiritual Fathers of the Church [taught] that unceasing prayer is a proper goal, for spiritual growth comes through such discipline. For centuries, Christian people have used the ‘Jesus Prayer’ as a way to pray unceasingly from the heart: ‘O Lord Jesus Christ, Son of God, have mercy on me, a sinner.’” [45]

“Scripture (e.g., Nu 11:25, 29) and Jewish tradition often associated the Spirit with prophetic inspiration (cf. 1Th 5:20). quench. When used most literally, this Greek term usually involved fire; cf. the idea (though not this term) in Jer 20:9.” [46] “The Holy Spirit is to be actively present in the life of the Church. But there is constant need of discernment and testing so as to avoid being misled (see 1Co 12-14).” [47]

“The requirements for harmonious life in community,” as outlined in today’s reading from 1 Thessalonians, “include the honoring of sacramental leadership (vv. 12-14), the pursuit of good works [Christ-honoring deeds] (v. 15), continual prayer and thanksgiving in worship (vv. 16-18), and a proper regard for prophetic gift and spiritual discernment (vv. 19-22).” [48]

In verses 20-21, Paul wrote, Do not despise prophecies, but test everything. “In ancient Israel, many newer prophets learned under the mentorship of senior prophets (e.g., 1Sa 19:20; 2Ki 6:1–3); in early Christianity, those newly moved by the Spirit often lacked senior prophets and often had to work together to evaluate prophecies (1Co 14:29).” [49]

“Paul gives both his final instruction about leadership and a benediction. Christians should support and encourage one another. We should respect the elders and leaders of our congregations because of their work for the Lord and the whole people of God. The Lord Jesus, by humbling Himself to the point of washing His disciples’ feet, showed to us the love He has for all believers. • Lord, give us Your heart and mind so that our life may be blameless, respecting and loving others. In Jesus’ name we pray. Amen.” [50]

Eventide Benediction

Peace be with me and all that are in Christ Jesus. Amen. [53]

Compline Prayer

Lord, you now have set your servant free to go in peace as you have promised; for these eyes of mine have seen the Savior, whom you have prepared for all the world to see: a Light to enlighten the nations, and the glory of your people Israel. Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit: as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.


Citations:

[1] Forward Movement. (2013). Thanksgivings. In Prayers for All Occasions (Kindle ed., pp. 188). Cincinnati, OH: Forward Movement.

[2] Episcopal Church. (1979). Prayers and Thanksgivings. In The Book of common prayer: And administration of the sacraments, and other rites and ceremonies of the church, according to the use of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States of America: Together with the psalter, or, Psalms of David (pp. 823). New York, NY: Church Publishing Incorporated.

[3] Forward Movement. (2013). Thanksgivings. In Prayers for All Occasions (Kindle ed., pp. 178). Cincinnati, OH: Forward Movement.

[4] Ibid. 3

[5] Academic Community of St. Athanasius Academy of Orthodox Theology (2008). Nehemiah. In The Orthodox study Bible (p. 596). Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson.

[6] Keener, C. S., Walton, J. H., & Matthews, V. A. (2016). Nehemiah. In NIV Cultural Backgrounds Study Bible (Kindle, pp. 2615). essay, Zondervan.

[7] Radmacher, E. D., Allen, R. B., & House, H. W. (2018). Nehemiah. In Holy Bible Nkjv Study Bible, Personal Size: Full-color Edition (Kindle, Third, p. 2926). essay, Thomas Nelson, Inc. 

[8] Ibid. 8, P. 2928

[9] Ibid. 8, P. 2928

[10] Ibid. 8, P. 2928

[11] Ibid. 8, P. 2928

[12] Ibid. 8, P. 2929

[13] Ibid. 8, P. 2929

[14] Ibid. 8, P. 2929

[15] Ibid. 8, P. 2929

[16] Ibid. 8, P. 2929

[17] Ibid. 8, P. 2929

[18] Ibid. 8, P. 2929

[19] Ibid. 8, P. 2929

[20] Ibid. 8, P. 2929

[21] Tyndale House Publishers. (2012). Nehemiah. In Chronological life application study Bible (Kindle ed., p. 6269). Carol Stream, IL: Tyndale House Pub.

[22] Radmacher, E. D., Allen, R. B., & House, H. W. (2018). Nehemiah. In Holy Bible Nkjv Study Bible, Personal Size: Full-color Edition (Kindle, Third, p. 2929). essay, Thomas Nelson, Inc. 

[23] Ibid. 22

[24] Ibid. 22, P. 2930

[25] Ibid. 22, P. 2930

[26] Tyndale House Publishers. (2012). Nehemiah. In Chronological life application study Bible (Kindle ed., p. 6269). Carol Stream, IL: Tyndale House Pub.

[27] Ibid. 26

[28] Forward Movement. (2013). Thanksgivings. In Prayers for All Occasions (Kindle ed., pp. 178). Cincinnati, OH: Forward Movement.

[29] Academic Community of St. Athanasius Academy of Orthodox Theology (2008). 1 Thessalonians. In The Orthodox study Bible (p. 1654). Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson.

[30] 1 Thessalonians. (2019). In Ancient faith study Bible (Kindle ed., p. 3383). Nashville: Holman Bible.

[31] Academic Community of St. Athanasius Academy of Orthodox Theology (2008). 1 Thessalonians. In The Orthodox study Bible (p. 1658). Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson

[32] Keener, C. S., Walton, J. H., & Matthews, V. A. (2016). 1 Thessalonians. In NIV Cultural Backgrounds Study Bible (Kindle, pp. 7126). essay, Zondervan.

[33] Ibid. 32

[34] Ibid. 32

[35] Ibid. 32

[36] Academic Community of St. Athanasius Academy of Orthodox Theology (2008). 1 Thessalonians. In The Orthodox study Bible (p. 1658). Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson

[37] Keener, C. S., Walton, J. H., & Matthews, V. A. (2016). 1 Thessalonians. In NIV Cultural Backgrounds Study Bible (Kindle, pp. 7126). essay, Zondervan.

[38] Chrysostom. (2019). 1 Thessalonians. In Ancient faith study Bible (Kindle ed., p. 3383-3384). Nashville: Holman Bible.

[39] A., E. E. (2016). 1 Thessalonians. In The Lutheran study Bible: English standard version (Kindle ed., pp. 8781). Saint Louis: Concordia Publishing House.

[40] Academic Community of St. Athanasius Academy of Orthodox Theology (2008). 1 Thessalonians. In The Orthodox study Bible (p. 1654). Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson

[41] Keener, C. S., Walton, J. H., & Matthews, V. A. (2016). 1 Thessalonians. In NIV Cultural Backgrounds Study Bible (Kindle, pp. 7127). essay, Zondervan.

[42] Academic Community of St. Athanasius Academy of Orthodox Theology (2008). 1 Thessalonians. In The Orthodox study Bible (p. 1658). Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson

[43] Keener, C. S., Walton, J. H., & Matthews, V. A. (2016). 1 Thessalonians. In NIV Cultural Backgrounds Study Bible (Kindle, pp. 7127). essay, Zondervan.

[44] Academic Community of St. Athanasius Academy of Orthodox Theology (2008). 1 Thessalonians. In The Orthodox study Bible (p. 1658). Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson

[45] Ibid. 44

[46] Keener, C. S., Walton, J. H., & Matthews, V. A. (2016). 1 Thessalonians. In NIV Cultural Backgrounds Study Bible (Kindle, pp. 7127). essay, Zondervan.

[47] Academic Community of St. Athanasius Academy of Orthodox Theology (2008). 1 Thessalonians. In The Orthodox study Bible (p. 1658). Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson

[48] Ibid. 47

[49] Keener, C. S., Walton, J. H., & Matthews, V. A. (2016). 1 Thessalonians. In NIV Cultural Backgrounds Study Bible (Kindle, pp. 7127). essay, Zondervan.

[50] A., E. E. (2016). 1 Thessalonians. In The Lutheran study Bible: English standard version (Kindle ed., pp. 8230). Saint Louis: Concordia Publishing House.

[51] The Episcopal Church. (2018). Seasonal Blessings. In The Book of Occasional Services (PDF ed., p. 8). Then Episcopal Church. Retrieved November December 15, 2020, from https://episcopalchurch.org/files/lm_book_of_occasional_services_2018.pdf

[52] Ibid. 51

[53] Forward Movement. (2013). Benedictions. In Prayers for All Occasions (Kindle ed., pp. 1092 Cincinnati, OH: Forward Movement.

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