November 16 Devotional (2021)


November 16 Commemoration: Queen Margaret of Scotland

O God, who didst call thy servant Margaret to an earthly throne That she might advance thy heavenly kingdom, and didst give her zeal for thy church and love for thy prople: Mercifully grant that we who commemorate her this day may be fruitful in good works, and attain to the glorious crown of thy saints; though Jesus Christ our Lord, who liveth and reigneth with thee and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.


November 16, 2021
Ordinary Time

Today’s Readings: 

  • Psalm 3, Deliverance belongs to God
  • Daniel 8:15-27, Signs of the end times
  • Hebrews 10:32-39, Call for endurance

Invitatory

The Lord, the King of Confessors, * O come, let us worship.

Opening Prayer

Ever the first thing I say,

when I rise at break of day:

the cross of Christ I’ll wear alway.

I will wear it seemly well,

’tis to me no fabled spell:

in my Maker do I dwell. 

Amen. [1]

Intercession 

For the Human Family

O God, you made us in your own image and redeemed us through Jesus your Son: Look with compassion on the whole human family; take away the arrogance and hatred which infect our hearts; break down the walls that separate us; unite us in bonds of love; and work through our struggle and confusion to accomplish your purposes on earth; that, in your good time, all nations and races may serve you in harmony around your heavenly throne; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen. [2]

Hymn

“I Heard the Voice of Jesus Say”

Morning Prayer

The Apostles’ Creed

I believe in God, the Father almighty,

    creator of heaven and earth;

I believe in Jesus Christ, his only Son, our Lord.

    He was conceived by the power of the Holy Spirit

        and born of the Virgin Mary.

    He suffered under Pontius Pilate,

        was crucified, died, and was buried.

    He descended to the dead.

    On the third day he rose again.

    He ascended into heaven,

        and is seated at the right hand of the Father.

    He will come again to judge the living and the dead.

I believe in the Holy Spirit,

    the holy catholic Church,

    the communion of saints,

    the forgiveness of sins

    the resurrection of the body,

    and the life everlasting. Amen.

Short Verse

Create in me a clean heart, O God,

And renew a steadfast spirit within me.

Psalm 51:10

Morning Reading

Psalm 3, Deliverance belongs to God

O Lord, how many are my foes!

Many are rising against me;

many are saying to me,

“There is no help for you in God.”    Selah

But you, O Lord, are a shield around me,

my glory, and the one who lifts up my head.

I cry aloud to the Lord,

and he answers me from his holy hill.    Selah

I lie down and sleep;

I wake again, for the Lord sustains me.

I am not afraid of ten thousands of people

who have set themselves against me all around.

Rise up, O Lord!

Deliver me, O my God!

For you strike all my enemies on the cheek;

you break the teeth of the wicked.

Deliverance belongs to the Lord;

may your blessing be on your people!    Selah

Morning Lesson

“The historical account in Ps 3 is that of King David fleeing from his son, Absalom (2Kg 15-18). But prophetically, Ps 3 is speaking of Jesus the Son of David according to the flesh (Mt 1:1; Rom 1:3). Thus, Jesus is praying to the Lord, who is God the Father (vv. 2, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9). And who rise up against me (v. 2) are the fallen angels, of whom Absalom and his army were a type. These angels, which number ten thousands (v. 7), always lie in their denial of man’s salvation through Christ (v. 3). But just as Jesus always rejected their lies (vv. 4-9), so He is teaching His Church to do the same.” [3]

Commentary from the Early Church
Psalm 3:3 

Saint Didymus the Blind

“Since the psalm is spoken from the person of the Lord, it must be said that even the head of him who is lifted up is of God, since really his deity is made manifest to the faithful through external demonstration. The word head in this place indicates “chief.” Christ, therefore, the chief of holy people, deservedly is their king, and it is his head that is lifted up.”

(Fragments on the Psalms 3.4) [4]

Psalm 3:5 

Saint Augustine

“That this psalm should be understood as spoken in the person of Christ is strongly suggested by the words [in. v. 5]. For this seems more in tune with the Lord’s passion and resurrection than with the particular story in which we are told about David’s flight from the face of his own son who was at loggerheads with him.”

(Expositions of the Psalms 3.1) [5]


Midday Prayer

Grace at a Meal

Bless, O Lord, thy gifts to our use and us to thy service; for Christ’s sake. Amen. [6]

Short Verse

You are altogether beautiful, my love; there is no flaw in you.

Song of Solomon 4:7

Midday Reading

Daniel 8:15-27, Signs of the end times

15 When I, Daniel, had seen the vision, I sought to understand it. And behold, there stood before me one having the appearance of a man. 16 And I heard a man’s voice between the banks of the Ulai, and it called, “Gabriel, make this man understand the vision.” 17 So he came near where I stood. And when he came, I was frightened and fell on my face. But he said to me, “Understand, O son of man, that the vision is for the time of the end.”

18 And when he had spoken to me, I fell into a deep sleep with my face to the ground. But he touched me and made me stand up. 19 He said, “Behold, I will make known to you what shall be at the latter end of the indignation, for it refers to the appointed time of the end. 20 As for the ram that you saw with the two horns, these are the kings of Media and Persia. 21 And the goat is the king of Greece. And the great horn between his eyes is the first king. 22 s for the horn that was broken, in place of which four others arose, four kingdoms shall arise from his nation, but not with his power. 23 And at the latter end of their kingdom, when the transgressors have reached their limit, a king of bold face, one who understands riddles, shall arise. 24 His power shall be great—but not by his own power; and he shall cause fearful destruction and shall succeed in what he does, and destroy mighty men and the people who are the saints. 25 By his cunning he shall make deceit prosper under his hand, and in his own mind he shall become great. Without warning he shall destroy many. And he shall even rise up against the Prince of princes, and he shall be broken—but by no human hand. 26 The vision of the evenings and the mornings that has been told is true, but seal up the vision, for it refers to many days from now.”

27 And I, Daniel, was overcome and lay sick for some days. Then I rose and went about the king’s business, but I was appalled by the vision and did not understand it.

Miniature of Gabriel explaining the vision to Daniel (Daniel 8:15-17).

Midday Lesson

The Interpretation of the Vision

Daniel 8:14:

The temple was cleansed under Judas Maccabeus after he had led the Jews to victory over the Syrians. St. Jerome says that most church commentators see a partial fulfillment of these events in the persecution of Antiochus, but that the passage also points to the antichrist, the king who shall arise (v. 23). The antichrist is himself a type of all those who raise themselves up against Christ. Thus, his downfall at Christ’s Second Coming symbolizes the final destruction of all evil and the realization of Christ’s eternal kingdom.

[13]

Daniel 8:15, appearance of a man:

The archangel Gabriel, who is sent from heaven to interpret Daniel’s vision (8:16; 9:21).

[7]

Daniel 8:17, fell upon my face:

A typical response to the overwhelming experience of coming face to face with God or one of his angels (Gen 17:3; Josh 5:14; Ezek 1:28; Rev 1:17) (CCC 330). time of the end: Not the end of history, but the end of Antiochus Epiphanes’ assault on the Jewish way of life (1 Mac 1:29-61).

[8]

Daniel 8:24, people of the saints:

The faithful of Israel.

[9]

Daniel 8:25, against the Prince:

Indicates that Antiochus will assert himself against the Lord. This detail of the prophecy proved to be quite accurate, for the Seleucid king declared himself to be theos epiphanes, “God Manifest”.

[10]

Daniel 8:25, no human hand:

Antiochus was brought low, not by the human hand of a soldier or assassin, but by the hand of God, who struck the king with excruciating afflictions in his body (2 Mac 9:5-12).

[11]

Daniel 8:26, many days hence:

The prophecy concerns events to come several centuries after Daniel’s lifetime.

[12]

Daniel 8:26, but seal up the vision, for it refers to many days from now:

“The things, therefore, which of old were sealed, are now by the grace of God the Lord all open to the saints, for He was Himself the perfect Seal, and the Church is the key. … But to Christ it was not said ‘seal,’ but ‘loose’ the things bound of old; in order that, by His grace, we might know the will of the Father, and believe upon Him whom He has sent for the salvation of men, Jesus our Lord” (Hippolytus).

[14]

Eventide Prayer

Eternal God, who led your ancient people into freedom by a pillar of cloud by day and a pillar of fire by night: Grant that we who walk in the light of your presence may rejoice in the liberty of the children of God; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen. [15]

Short Verse

And we all, with unveiled face, beholding the glory of the Lord, are being transformed into the same image from one degree of glory to another. For this comes from the Lord who is the Spirit.

2 Corinthians 3:18

Eventide Reading

Hebrews 10:32-39, Call for endurance

32 But recall the former days when, after you were enlightened, you endured a hard struggle with sufferings, 33 sometimes being publicly exposed to reproach and affliction, and sometimes being partners with those so treated. 34 For you had compassion on those in prison, and you joyfully accepted the plundering of your property, since you knew that you yourselves had a better possession and an abiding one. 35 Therefore do not throw away your confidence, which has a great reward. 36 For you have need of endurance, so that when you have done the will of God you may receive what is promised. 37 For,

“Yet a little while,

and the coming one will come and will not delay;

38 but my righteous one shall live by faith,

and if he shrinks back,

my soul has no pleasure in him.”

39 But we are not of those who shrink back and are destroyed, but of those who have faith and preserve their souls.

Eventide Lesson

Patience through many sorrows

The word enlightened (illumination, enlightenment) in verse 32 “refers to Baptism and its new, light-filled life.” [16] “In the early Church, Baptism was sometimes called ‘enlightenment,’ as well as ‘gift,’ ‘grace,’ ‘anointing,’ ‘garment of immortality,’ ‘bath of rebirth,’ ‘seal,’ and ‘most precious gift.’” [17] It is at Baptism that we are “given the Holy Spirit.” [18] “At Baptism, the new Christian is ‘enlightened’ by the Holy Spirit and becomes a son or daughter of light who ‘radiates light.’” [19]

Our passage from Hebrews reminds us that “all Christians need patience through many sorrows. God calls us to do His will , bearing our crosses patiently, and He equips us with His Word and Spirit. He has promised eternal salvation to all who steadfastly confess Christ. • Lord Jesus, strengthen me to confess You without wavering. When I fall, grant me a repentant heart. Amen.” [20]

Compline Prayer

At midnight I cry. Grant that we may be found prepared for the bridegroom; who reigns forever and ever. Amen. 

– Antiphonary of Bangor, Collect at Second Nocturn (Compline) [21]


Citations:

[1] Stratman, P. (2001). Morning Prayers. In Prayers from the Ancient Celtic Church (Kindle ed., p. 16). Crossway.

[2] Episcopal Church. (1979). Prayers and Thanksgivings. In The Book of common prayer: And administration of the sacraments, and other rites and ceremonies of the church, according to the use of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States of America: Together with the psalter, or, Psalms of David (pp. 815). New York, NY: Church Publishing Incorporated.

[3] Academic Community of St. Athanasius Academy of Orthodox Theology (2008). Psalms. In The Orthodox study Bible (p. 713). Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson.

[4] Didymus the Blind. (2019). Psalms. In Ancient faith study Bible (Kindle ed., p. 1528). Nashville: Holman Bible.

[5] Augustine. (2019). Psalms. In Ancient faith study Bible (Kindle ed., p. 1528). Nashville: Holman Bible.

[6] Episcopal Church. (1979). Prayers and Thanksgivings. In The Book of common prayer: And administration of the sacraments, and other rites and ceremonies of the church, according to the use of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States of America: Together with the psalter, or, Psalms of David (pp. 835). New York, NY: Church Publishing Incorporated.

[7] Hahn, S., Mitch, C., & Walters, D. (2013). Commentary. In Daniel (Sec Catholic ed., p. 2202). San Francisco, CA: Ignatius Press.

[8] Ibid. 7

[9] Ibid. 7

[10] Ibid. 7, P. 2207

[11] Ibid. 7, P. 2207

[12] Ibid. 7, P. 2207

[13] Academic Community of St. Athanasius Academy of Orthodox Theology (2008). Daniel. In The Orthodox study Bible (p. 1293). Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson.

[14] Ibid. 13

[15] Episcopal Church. (1979). Daily Office, Rite II. In The Book of common prayer: And administration of the sacraments, and other rites and ceremonies of the church, according to the use of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States of America: Together with the psalter, or, Psalms of David (pp. 111). New York, NY: Church Publishing Incorporated.

[16] A., E. E. (2016). Hebrews. In The Lutheran study Bible: English standard version (Kindle ed., pp. 8443). Saint Louis: Concordia Publishing House.

[17] Cole, J. (Ed.). (2015). Hebrews. In Didache Bible: With commentaries based on the Catechism of the Catholic Church (Kindle ed., p. 3710). Downers Grove, IL: Midwest Theological Forum, Ignatius Press.

[18] A., E. E. (2016). Hebrews. In The Lutheran study Bible: English standard version (Kindle ed., pp. 8457). Saint Louis: Concordia Publishing House.

[19] Cole, J. (Ed.). (2015). Hebrews. In Didache Bible: With commentaries based on the Catechism of the Catholic Church (Kindle ed., p. 3710). Downers Grove, IL: Midwest Theological Forum, Ignatius Press.

[20] A., E. E. (2016). Hebrews. In The Lutheran study Bible: English standard version (Kindle ed., pp. 8458). Saint Louis: Concordia Publishing House.

[21] Stratman, P. (2001). Evening Prayers. In Prayers from the Ancient Celtic Church (Kindle ed., p. 19). Crossway.

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