November 6 Devotional (2021)


November 6th Commemoration: William Temple

O God, our heavenly Father, who didst raise up thy faithful Servant William Temple to be a bishop and pastor in thy Church and to feed thy flock: Give abundantly to all pastors the gifts of thy Holy Spirit, that they may minister in thy household as true servants of Christ and stewards of thy divine mysteries; through the same Jesus Christ our Lord, who liveth and reigneth with thee and the same Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.


November 6, 2021
Ordinary Time

Today’s Readings: 

  • The First Song of Isaiah,  Ecce, Deus 
  • Deuteronomy 24:17-22, Laws concerning the poor
  • Mark 11:12-14, 20-25, Condemnation and blessing

Invitatory

God is the great Lord * Come, let us adore Him.

Opening Prayer

O God, 

You who dwell on high,

And yet consider the humble

In heaven and in earth,

In the sea and in all its depths,

From the depths of our heart

We pray that you would strengthen

Our hearts for battle,

Our fingers for war,

That in the morning

We may be able to face 

All trouble in our world,

And that we may not fail

To be worthy to be

Your holy temple, O Christ;

You reign forever and ever.

Amen. [1]

Intercession

[2]

Hymn 

“We Are Climbing Jacob’s Ladder” 

(African-American Spiritual)

Lyrics:

We are climbing Jacob’s ladder; 

We are climbing Jacob’s ladder, 

We are climbing Jacob’s ladder; 

Soldiers of the cross. 

Every round goes higher, higher; 

Every round goes higher, higher, 

Every round goes higher, higher, 

Soldiers of the cross. 

Sinner, do you love my Jesus? 

Sinner, do you love my Jesus? 

Sinner, do you love my Jesus? 

Soldiers of the cross. 

If you love him, why not serve him? 

If you love him, why not serve him? 

If you love him, why not serve him? 

Soldiers of the cross. 

We are climbing higher, higher, 

We are climbing higher, higher, 

We are climbing higher, higher, 

Soldiers of the cross. [2]


Morning Prayer

For Pardon and Peace

Grant to your faithful people, merciful Lord, pardon and peace; that we may be cleansed from all our sins, and serve you with a quiet mind; through Jesus Christ our Lord.  Amen. [4]

Short Verse

Thus says the Lord: Do justice and righteousness, and deliver from the hand of the oppressor him who has been robbed. And do no wrong or violence to the resident alien, the fatherless, and the widow, nor shed innocent blood in this place.

Jeremiah 22:3

Morning Reading

The First Song of Isaiah,  Ecce, Deus ( Isaiah 12:2-6)

Surely, it is God who saves me; *

    I will trust in him and not be afraid.

For the Lord is my stronghold and my sure defense, *

    and he will be my Savior.

Therefore you shall draw water with rejoicing *

    from the springs of salvation.

And on that day you shall say, *

    Give thanks to the Lord and call upon his Name;

Make his deeds known among the peoples; *

    see that they remember that his Name is exalted.

Sing the praises of the Lord, for he has done great things, *

    and this is known in all the world.

Cry aloud, inhabitants of Zion, ring out your joy, *

    for the great one in the midst of you is the Holy One of Israel.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit: *

    as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.


Midday Prayer

For Desiring God

O God, grant that we may desire you, and desiring you seek you, and seeking you find you, and finding you be satisfied in you for ever. Amen.

By Francis Xavier [5]

Short Verse

Be gracious to me, O Lord, for I am in distress; my eye is wasted from grief; my soul and my body also.

Psalm 31:9

Midday Reading

Deuteronomy 24:17-22, Laws concerning the poor

17 Do not deprive the foreigner or the fatherless of justice, or take the cloak of the widow as a pledge. 18 Remember that you were slaves in Egypt and the Lord your God redeemed you from there. That is why I command you to do this.

19 When you are harvesting in your field and you overlook a sheaf, do not go back to get it. Leave it for the foreigner, the fatherless and the widow, so that the Lord your God may bless you in all the work of your hands. 20 When you beat the olives from your trees, do not go over the branches a second time. Leave what remains for the foreigner, the fatherless and the widow. 21 When you harvest the grapes in your vineyard, do not go over the vines again. Leave what remains for the foreigner, the fatherless and the widow. 22 Remember that you were slaves in Egypt. That is why I command you to do this.

Midday Lesson

Do justice for the vulnerable 

Our reading from Deuteronomy begins with a powerful injunction: Do not deprive the foreigner or the fatherless of justice, or take the cloak of the widow as a pledge. This admonition of socio-justice was “widespread and found in documents at Ugarit, in Akkadian texts and in texts from Nuzi. A common social and legal concern for persons in these situations was part of the ancient Near Eastern culture, but nowhere as it was in Israel. Four classes of persons outside the normal safety nets of these ancient societies are highlighted: widow, orphan, foreigner and the poor. All four groups were vulnerable and subject to abuse.” [6]

Foreigners were “not mentioned along with the other three in the law collections outside Israel. The Moabite Stone records the death of ‘grn’ and ‘grt,’ male and female sojourners, among those whom Mesha, the king of Moab, killed in his war against Israel. Israel had experienced firsthand what it was to be a foreigner in a strange land and culture (v. 18), and thus the foreigner was specifically written into her laws. Showing hospitality to the stranger was far from providing for them in the laws of a nation. These foreigners were residents in various countries but did not enjoy citizenship; hence, they were denied significant legal rights. Israel’s God heard their cry.” [7]

“Throughout the Old Testament God told his people to treat the poor with justice. The powerless and poverty-stricken are often looked upon by some people as incompetent or lazy when, in fact, those facing that situation may be victims of oppression and circumstance. God says we must do all we can to help those who are needy. His justice did not permit the Israelites to insist on profits or quick payment from those who were less fortunate. Instead, his laws gave the poor every opportunity to better their situation, while providing humane options for those who couldn’t. None of us is completely isolated from the poor; many of us face needs at one time or another. God wants us to treat each other fairly and do our part to help meet one another’s needs.” [8]

“God’s people were instructed to leave some of their harvest in the fields so travelers and the poor could gather it. This second gathering, called gleaning, was a way for them to provide food for themselves. Years later, Ruth obtained food for herself and Naomi by gleaning behind the reapers in Boaz’s field, picking up the leftovers (Ruth 2:2). Because this law was being obeyed years after it was written, Ruth, a woman in Christ’s lineage, was able to find food.” [9]


Eventide Prayer

O Lord God Almighty, as you have taught us to call the evening, the morning, and the noonday one day; and have made the sun to know its going down: Dispel the darkness of our hearts, that by your brightness we may know you to be the true God and eternal light, living and reigning for ever and ever. Amen. [10]

Short Verse

“So you, by the help of your God, return, hold fast to love and justice, and wait continually for your God.”

Hosea 12:6
The Fig Tree by Graham Braddock
(source: fineartamerica)

Eventide Reading

Mark 11:12-14, 20-25, Condemnation and blessing

12 On the following day, when they came from Bethany, he was hungry. 13 And seeing in the distance a fig tree in leaf, he went to see if he could find anything on it. When he came to it, he found nothing but leaves, for it was not the season for figs. 14 And he said to it, “May no one ever eat fruit from you again.” And his disciples heard it.

20 As they passed by in the morning, they saw the fig tree withered away to its roots. 21 And Peter remembered and said to him, “Rabbi, look! The fig tree that you cursed has withered.” 22 And Jesus answered them, “Have faith in God. 23 Truly, I say to you, whoever says to this mountain, ‘Be taken up and thrown into the sea,’ and does not doubt in his heart, but believes that what he says will come to pass, it will be done for him. 24 Therefore I tell you, whatever you ask in prayer, believe that you have received it, and it will be yours. 25 And whenever you stand praying, forgive, if you have anything against anyone, so that your Father also who is in heaven may forgive you your trespasses.”

Eventide Lesson

The Lesson from the Withered Fig Tree

Verse 13 notes that it was not the season for figs. What this indicates is “that this fig tree had sprouted an early full foliage, but without bearing any fruit. Jesus, finding not even one fig, condemns it. In Scripture a fig tree is often a symbol of Israel (Hos 9:10). Her fruitfulness has ceased, so the Kingdom will be taken from her and given to another people, who are called to bear spiritual fruit (see Mt 21:43; Gal 5:22, 23).” [11]

“The cursing and withering of the fig tree [was] a prophetic act signifying the judgment of Israel. The disciples need[ed] to learn that the old covenant with Israel [was] becoming ‘obsolete’ and [would] ‘vanish away’ (Heb 8:13). They [would] establish His Church, ultimately to be filled with Gentiles and Jews, and [they needed] assurance that they [were] following His will. The fig tree [would] be an indelible image in their minds.” [12]

“The story of the fig tree stresses the need to bear fruit even if it is not the season. If we have complete trust in God and do our part, our prayers will occasion great miracles in the work of evangelization. Christ also calls his followers to forgive the offenses of others as a condition for worthy and effective prayer. God our Father will forgive our own sins to the extent we forgive others.” [13]

“God forgives our own sins to the extent we forgive others. Christ called upon his followers to forgive the offenses of others before praying. Stand praying: Jews traditionally stand when they pray as a sign of respect.” [14]

Compline Prayer

Our Father, the day is over and I turn to you before I take my rest. You have been with me all the day long, and for all your mercies, perceived and unperceived, I give thanks. Of all that has been amiss in me, in thought, word, and deed, I repent, and ask your gracious forgiveness as I also forgive all who have offended me. Grant me now the blessings of a quiet mind and a trustful spirit, the freedom from fear of a child in its father’s house. So let me rest in you, at peace with you and with all people. Amen. [15]


Citations:

[1] Stratman, P. (2001). Morning Prayers. In Prayers from the Ancient Celtic Church (Kindle ed., p. 15). Crossway.

[2] Forward Movement. (2013). Intercessions. In Prayers for All Occasions (Kindle ed., pp. 613). Cincinnati, OH: Forward Movement.

[3] Tickle, P. (2000). November. In The divine hours: Prayers for Prayers for Autumn and Wintertime (Kindle ed., vol. 2, p. 191). New York, NY: Image Books.

[4] Morning Prayer. (2019). In The Book of Common Prayer (PDF). Anglican Church in North America. Retrieved at: http://bcp2019.anglicanchurch.net/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/06-Daily-Morning-Prayer-11.21.2019.docx

[5] Occasional Prayers. (2019). In The Book of Common Prayer (PDF). Anglican Church in North America. Retrieved at: http://bcp2019.anglicanchurch.net/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/56-Occasional-Prayers.docx

[6] Keener, C. S., Walton, J. H., & Matthews, V. A. (2016). Deuteronomy. In NIV Cultural Backgrounds Study Bible (Kindle, pp. 1201). essay, Zondervan.

[7] Ibid. 6

[8] Tyndale House Publishers. (2012). Deuteronomy. In Chronological life application study Bible (Kindle ed., p. 5447). Carol Stream, IL: Tyndale House Pub.

[9] Ibid. 8

[10] Episcopal Church. (1979). Daily Office, Rite II. In The Book of common prayer: And administration of the sacraments, and other rites and ceremonies of the church, according to the use of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States of America: Together with the psalter, or, Psalms of David (pp. 110). New York, NY: Church Publishing Incorporated.

[11] Academic Community of St. Athanasius Academy of Orthodox Theology (2008). Mark. In The Orthodox study Bible (p. 1377). Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson.

[12] Ibid. 11, P. 1378

[13] Cole, J. (Ed.). (2015). Mark. In Didache Bible: With commentaries based on the Catechism of the Catholic Church (Kindle ed., p. 3013). Downers Grove, IL: Midwest Theological Forum, Ignatius Press.

[14] Ibid. 13, P. 3014

[15] Forward Movement. (2013). Daily Prayers. In Prayers for All Occasions (Kindle ed., pp. 161). Cincinnati, OH: Forward Movement.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

Create your website with WordPress.com
Get started
%d bloggers like this: