October 30 Devotional (2021)

October 30, 2021
Ordinary Time

Today’s Readings: 

  • Numbers 9:1-14
  • Exodus 22:1-15
  • Luke 10:25-37

Invitatory

The earth is the Lord’s for he made it: Come let us adore him.

Opening Prayer

We pray to you, O Most High, 

as the light of the sun comes forth, 

may the name of Christ arise 

and be with us, Lord; 

you reign forever. Amen.

-Antiphonary of Bangor [1]

The Hymn 

“O Zion, Haste” by Mary Thomson
Lyrics:

O Zion, haste, your mission high fulfilling, 

To tell to all the world that God is Light; 

That He who made all nations is not willing 

One soul should perish, lost in shades of night. 

Publish glad tidings, tidings of peace, 

Tidings of Jesus, redemption and release. 

Proclaim to every people, tongue, and nation 

That God, in whom they live and move, is Love: 

Tell how He stooped to save His lost creation, 

And died on earth that man might live above. 

Publish glad tidings, tidings of peace, 

Tidings of Jesus, redemption and release. 

Give of your sons to bear the message glorious; 

Give of your wealth to speed them on their way; 

Pour out your soul for them in prayer victorious; 

And all you spend dear Jesus will repay. 

Publish glad tidings, tidings of peace, 

Tidings of Jesus, redemption and release. [3]


Morning Prayer

A Collect for Saturdays

Almighty God, who after the creation of the world rested from all your works and sanctified a day of rest for all your creatures: Grant that we, putting away all earthly anxieties, may be duly prepared for the service of your sanctuary, and that our rest here upon earth may be a preparation for the eternal rest promised to your people in heaven; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen. [4]

Short Verse

Learn to do good; seek justice, correct oppression; bring justice to the fatherless, plead the widow’s cause.

Isaiah 1:17

Morning Reading

Numbers 9:1-14, The same statute for all

1 And the LORD spoke to Moses in the wilderness of Sinai, in the first month of the second year after they had come out of the land of Egypt, saying, 2 “Let the people of Israel keep the Passover at its appointed time. 3 On the fourteenth day of this month, at twilight, you shall keep it at its appointed time; according to all its statutes and all its rules you shall keep it.” 4 So Moses told the people of Israel that they should keep the Passover. 5 And they kept the Passover in the first month, on the fourteenth day of the month, at twilight, in the wilderness of Sinai; according to all that the LORD commanded Moses, so the people of Israel did. 6 And there were certain men who were unclean through touching a dead body, so that they could not keep the Passover on that day, and they came before Moses and Aaron on that day. 7 And those men said to him, “We are unclean through touching a dead body. Why are we kept from bringing the LORD’s offering at its appointed time among the people of Israel?” 8 And Moses said to them, “Wait, that I may hear what the LORD will command concerning you.”

9 The LORD spoke to Moses, saying, 10 “Speak to the people of Israel, saying, If any one of you or of your descendants is unclean through touching a dead body, or is on a long journey, he shall still keep the Passover to the LORD. 11 In the second month on the fourteenth day at twilight they shall keep it. They shall eat it with unleavened bread and bitter herbs. 12 They shall leave none of it until the morning, nor break any of its bones; according to all the statute for the Passover they shall keep it. 13 But if anyone who is clean and is not on a journey fails to keep the Passover, that person shall be cut off from his people because he did not bring the LORD’s offering at its appointed time; that man shall bear his sin. 14 And if a stranger sojourns among you and would keep the Passover to the LORD, according to the statute of the Passover and according to its rule, so shall he do. You shall have one statute, both for the sojourner and for the native.”

Morning Lesson

God’s grace in the Passover celebration

“On the one-year anniversary of the Passover and deliverance from Egypt, God commanded Israel to celebrate the Passover at the foot of Mount Sinai.” [5] “How is this Passover celebration like our celebration of the Lord’s Supper?… The Israelites slaughtered their Passover lambs and ate their meat, thereby giving God thanks for the animals who died that they might be forgiven, protected from their enemies, and set free from slavery. In Holy Communion, we eat the very same body and blood that Jesus, our Passover Lamb, sacrificed to death on the cross to forgive our sins, protect us from the devil, and set us free from death and hell.” [6]

“The Lord commanded the unclean to observe the Passover one month later [vv. 9-11], thus permitting all Israelites to celebrate the festival before beginning their journey from Mount Sinai to the Promised Land (10:11). This special provision applied also when their descendants in the desert had strayed ‘on a long journey’ (lit, ‘on a distant way’). However, the basic requirements of the Passover were not changed (vv 11–12).” [7] In this was, “God show[ed] His mercy to the men who honored their dead by taking care of their corpses, but became ceremonially unclean by doing so.” [8]

“God commands Moses to celebrate Passover anew as a memorial of His great deliverance. All people were to participate, even if they could not observe the event on the same dates. God reveals His grace in the Passover and in the exceptions He allows for its observance. Just as He continually sought the good and unity of Israel, He seeks our good and unity in the services of His precious Word, which describes our creation, redemption, and sanctification as His people through faith in Christ, our Passover Lamb. • Lord, we deserve death because of our sins. Yet Your Son’s blood covers our sins and grants eternal life. Unite our hearts in the confession of this faith. Amen.” [9]


Midday Prayer

For the Glory of His Resurrection

Pour your grace into our hearts, O Lord, that we who have known the incarnation of your Son Jesus Christ, announced by an angel to the Virgin Mary, may by his Cross and passion be brought to the glory of his resurrection; who lives and reigns with you, in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever. Amen. [10]

Short Verse

He will swallow up death forever; and the Lord God will wipe away tears from all faces, and the reproach of his people he will take away from all the earth, for the Lord has spoken.

Isaiah 25:8

Midday Reading

Exodus 22:1-15, Rules for relations with neighbors

1 “Whoever steals an ox or a sheep and slaughters it or sells it must pay back five head of cattle for the ox and four sheep for the sheep.

2 “If a thief is caught breaking in at night and is struck a fatal blow, the defender is not guilty of bloodshed; 3 but if it happens after sunrise, the defender is guilty of bloodshed.

“Anyone who steals must certainly make restitution, but if they have nothing, they must be sold to pay for their theft. 4 If the stolen animal is found alive in their possession—whether ox or donkey or sheep—they must pay back double.

5 “If anyone grazes their livestock in a field or vineyard and lets them stray and they graze in someone else’s field, the offender must make restitution from the best of their own field or vineyard.

6 “If a fire breaks out and spreads into thornbushes so that it burns shocks of grain or standing grain or the whole field, the one who started the fire must make restitution.

7 “If anyone gives a neighbor silver or goods for safekeeping and they are stolen from the neighbor’s house, the thief, if caught, must pay back double. 8 But if the thief is not found, the owner of the house must appear before the judges, and they must determine whether the owner of the house has laid hands on the other person’s property. 9 In all cases of illegal possession of an ox, a donkey, a sheep, a garment, or any other lost property about which somebody says, ‘This is mine,’ both parties are to bring their cases before the judges. The one whom the judges declare guilty must pay back double to the other.

10 “If anyone gives a donkey, an ox, a sheep or any other animal to their neighbor for safekeeping and it dies or is injured or is taken away while no one is looking, 11 the issue between them will be settled by the taking of an oath before the Lord that the neighbor did not lay hands on the other person’s property. The owner is to accept this, and no restitution is required. 12 But if the animal was stolen from the neighbor, restitution must be made to the owner. 13 If it was torn to pieces by a wild animal, the neighbor shall bring in the remains as evidence and shall not be required to pay for the torn animal.

14 “If anyone borrows an animal from their neighbor and it is injured or dies while the owner is not present, they must make restitution. 15 But if the owner is with the animal, the borrower will not have to pay. If the animal was hired, the money paid for the hire covers the loss.

Midday Lesson

Do unto others…

In Exodus 21:33–22:15, which includes today’s passage, “God sets out rules that benefit all the members in Israel’s society.” [11]

Verse 9 “establishes the general principle on which the situation in the previous verse is based. Whenever there is disagreement between the depositor and the receiver about goods that may or may not have been deposited, the case is to be decided by a judicial oracle… If the receiver is declared guilty, he has most likely committed wrongdoing by appropriating the deposited goods for himself, and perhaps he has denied that the depositor ever gave him anything. But if the depositor is declared guilty, it means either he never deposited any goods in the first place and now claims that certain goods, which actually belong to the receiver, are his, or he has asked to be returned to him more goods than he originally deposited and is accusing the receiver of cheating him.” [12]

“Interestingly, the penalty for the depositor in Exodus matches that of the receiver, if the latter should be found guilty. The reason is that if the depositor (or would-be depositor) is guilty, what he is guilty of is false accusation. He has brought against the receiver criminal charges, which the judicial oracle has clearly refuted. In much of ancient Near Eastern law and in a later Biblical text (Dt 19:16–21), false accusers are to be punished with the same penalty that the defendant in the trial would have received if the accusation had turned out to be true; hence, the matching penalty.” [13]

Verse 11 mentions an oath before the LORD. “Rather than a receiver of a deposit in general, the issue here is a receiver who has been given an animal for safekeeping—i.e., a person has been hired to perform the duties of a shepherd or herdsman. This law establishes the limits on the shepherd’s liability for the loss of or any injury to the animal. Verse 12 states that theft of the animal requires the shepherd to compensate the owner for the latter’s loss. Verse 13 releases the shepherd from any liability if an animal predator attacks and kills the animal in his keeping.” [14]

“In other situations—death, injury, loss (with, presumably, no conclusive evidence of theft)—the shepherd is allowed to take an “oath before the LORD.” This is the suprarational procedure known as the judicial oath (see the article “Divine Verdict”). The shepherd swears, invoking the name of Yahweh, that he is not the cause of the death, injury or loss. In short, he swears to his innocence. Taking the oath is decisive here: ‘The owner is to accept this.’ Numerous Mesopotamian trial records refer to this type of oath and make clear that the one who takes the court-ordered judicial oath is guaranteed to win the case.” [15]

How do the laws found in today’s passage of Exodus “battle the greed and selfishness caused by the sinful nature of all the Israelites (and us)?” [16] “Each of these laws is a form of Jesus’ golden rule: ‘Whatever you wish that others would do to you, do also to them’ (Matthew 7:12). They recognize human sinfulness and greed, but together form a societal structure that would be marvelous to live under in such a sinful world as ours.” [17]


Eventide Prayer

A Collect for Saturdays

O God, the source of eternal light: Shed forth your unending day upon us who watch for you, that our lips may praise you, our lives may bless you, and our worship on the morrow give you glory; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen. [19]

Short Verse

He sent out his word and healed them, and delivered them from their destruction.

Psalm 107:20
Parable of the Good Samaritan by Balthasar van Cortbemde (1647) shows the Good Samaritan tending the injured man while the Levite and priest are also shown in the distance.

Eventide Reading

Luke 10:25-37, Who is my neighbor?

25 And behold, a lawyer stood up to put him to the test, saying, “Teacher, what shall I do to inherit eternal life?” 26 He said to him, “What is written in the Law? How do you read it?” 27 And he answered, “You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your strength and with all your mind, and your neighbor as yourself.” 28 And he said to him, “You have answered correctly; do this, and you will live.”

29 But he, desiring to justify himself, said to Jesus, “And who is my neighbor?” 30 Jesus replied, “A man was going down from Jerusalem to Jericho, and he fell among robbers, who stripped him and beat him and departed, leaving him half dead. 31 Now by chance a priest was going down that road, and when he saw him he passed by on the other side. 32 So likewise a Levite, when he came to the place and saw him, passed by on the other side. 33 But a Samaritan, as he journeyed, came to where he was, and when he saw him, he had compassion. 34 He went to him and bound up his wounds, pouring on oil and wine. Then he set him on his own animal and brought him to an inn and took care of him. 35 And the next day he took out two denarii and gave them to the innkeeper, saying, ‘Take care of him, and whatever more you spend, I will repay you when I come back.’ 36 Which of these three, do you think, proved to be a neighbor to the man who fell among the robbers?” 37 He said, “The one who showed him mercy.” And Jesus said to him, “You go, and do likewise.”

The Good Samaritan by Aimé Morot (1880) shows the Good Samaritan taking the injured man to the inn.

Eventide Lesson

The Parable of the Good Samaritan

“Many think Jesus told this parable to teach us how we should treat others. Though it does that,” it is not the only purpose of this parable. [20] “Jesus was [also] showing a lawyer that he had not kept the Commandments as he supposed and needed the forgiveness Jesus was going up to Jerusalem to earn for him and everyone.” [21]

“[T]his parable [gives us] a special view of what Jesus does for us.” [22] “Each sinner is like the man beaten by robbers. We are dying, and without Christ’s help, we will perish eternally. The priests and Levites of Jesus’ day had the Scriptures and the means to help dying sinners, but passed by on the other side—proclaiming man-made laws rather than God’s Gospel. Jesus, rejected by the authorities like a Samaritan, had pity and stopped to save and cure the sinner.” [23]

“The Pharisees had found 613 commandments in the Scriptures and debated about which one was central. Jesus sets forth the first and the second, which constitute the grand summary of the Law. Though the lawyer has come with malice to test the Lord, we know from St. Mark’s account that this man is converted by Christ’s answer (Mk 12:28-34).” [24]

“Christ often found himself opposed by the Scribes and Pharisees, but not all were antagonistic to his teaching. When the [lawyer] in this passage attempted to ‘test’ him, Christ engaged [the lawyer] in conversation. He praised the [lawyer’s] summary of the Law but broadened its application beyond what most believed: our ‘neighbor’ is not simply one who shares our religious faith, culture, or homeland. Followers of Christ are required to manifest their love of God through mercy and compassion toward all people.” [25]

The road from Jerusalem to Jericho.

Compline Prayer

A Collect for Saturdays

We give you thanks, O God, for revealing your Son Jesus Christ to us by the light of his resurrection: Grant that as we sing your glory at the close of this day, our joy may abound in the morning as we celebrate the Paschal mystery; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen. [26]


Citations:

[1] Stratman, P. (2001). Morning Prayers. In Prayers from the Ancient Celtic Church (Kindle ed., p. 13). Crossway.

[2] Forward Movement. (2013). Intercessions. In Prayers for All Occasions (Kindle ed., pp. 583). Cincinnati, OH: Forward Movement.

[3] Tickle, P. (2000). October. In The divine hours: Prayers for Prayers for Autumn and Wintertime (Kindle ed., vol. 2, p. 125). New York, NY: Image Books.

[4] Episcopal Church. (1979). Daily Office, Rite II. In The Book of common prayer: And administration of the sacraments, and other rites and ceremonies of the church, according to the use of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States of America: Together with the psalter, or, Psalms of David (pp. 99). New York, NY: Church Publishing Incorporated.

[5] Palmer, W. (2018). Numbers 9:1-14. In Books of the Bible Study Questions: Numbers (PDF ed., pp. 11). St. Louis, MO: Concordia Publishing House. Retrieved at: https://communication.cph.org/cs/c/?cta_guid=0e56606b-f776-446a-b4d3-5d08c4faf2de&signature=AAH58kE8hZOKm1hI_kqEZ53sVMV1ntL0hQ&pageId=12528320923&placement_guid=64fa8c58-570e-4fb9-8f08-21c4a7d980d7&click=79d008c9-fa7c-4afa-aff2-711b6e472864&hsutk=3061eb4a02b38238bc14da6053e1ed65&canon=https%3A%2F%2Fcommunication.cph.org%2Fbooks-of-the-bible-study-questions%2Fthank-you&portal_id=487463&contentType=standard-page&redirect_url=APefjpHYhFLiQjHtOxGBvsE37S-d-O6Kfbm6wBVrQPIntF30HyzAxZTx_g1NUd45NfTu5jJqxeaRdoopNg678K73-xdUImRUHYgDYqvuZF6lpEAEfnrdISdUZJ7_2fAI-5TITicjG4YUuVk2Rh_trlWxSHg5X0oV_xbfC8B2DbcoVHBKM8xvqPqGV4-eb09_DeX7a7F9BP3v_0ssv7ZCIFH8QrMbKQKoYD8YgSlwFjwWnpOnAr1jvZvE50v1qRa1V3I1i8qSbdi2_BDRp76QUbYkMjXOmJ4G3pDWUOc3fYyXGVpblI5FFuQqxxYQVDmacDFJsIxezVN3nHrSbyqHqL4PqWIzVmmKZCIi-hMOGe62gLU2S-0WD2c&__hstc=25153893.3061eb4a02b38238bc14da6053e1ed65.1635429911978.1635429911978.1635429911978.1&__hssc=25153893.1.1635429911978&__hsfp=1921498206.

[6] Ibid. 5, P. 11-12

[7] A., E. E. (2016). Numbers. In The Lutheran study Bible: English standard version (Kindle ed., pp. 1168-1169). Saint Louis: Concordia Publishing House.

[8] Palmer, W. (2018). Numbers 9:1-14. In Books of the Bible Study Questions: Numbers (PDF ed., pp. 12). St. Louis, MO: Concordia Publishing House. Retrieved at: https://communication.cph.org/cs/c/?cta_guid=0e56606b-f776-446a-b4d3-5d08c4faf2de&signature=AAH58kE8hZOKm1hI_kqEZ53sVMV1ntL0hQ&pageId=12528320923&placement_guid=64fa8c58-570e-4fb9-8f08-21c4a7d980d7&click=79d008c9-fa7c-4afa-aff2-711b6e472864&hsutk=3061eb4a02b38238bc14da6053e1ed65&canon=https%3A%2F%2Fcommunication.cph.org%2Fbooks-of-the-bible-study-questions%2Fthank-you&portal_id=487463&contentType=standard-page&redirect_url=APefjpHYhFLiQjHtOxGBvsE37S-d-O6Kfbm6wBVrQPIntF30HyzAxZTx_g1NUd45NfTu5jJqxeaRdoopNg678K73-xdUImRUHYgDYqvuZF6lpEAEfnrdISdUZJ7_2fAI-5TITicjG4YUuVk2Rh_trlWxSHg5X0oV_xbfC8B2DbcoVHBKM8xvqPqGV4-eb09_DeX7a7F9BP3v_0ssv7ZCIFH8QrMbKQKoYD8YgSlwFjwWnpOnAr1jvZvE50v1qRa1V3I1i8qSbdi2_BDRp76QUbYkMjXOmJ4G3pDWUOc3fYyXGVpblI5FFuQqxxYQVDmacDFJsIxezVN3nHrSbyqHqL4PqWIzVmmKZCIi-hMOGe62gLU2S-0WD2c&__hstc=25153893.3061eb4a02b38238bc14da6053e1ed65.1635429911978.1635429911978.1635429911978.1&__hssc=25153893.1.1635429911978&__hsfp=1921498206.

[9] A., E. E. (2016). Numbers. In The Lutheran study Bible: English standard version (Kindle ed., pp. 1169). Saint Louis: Concordia Publishing House.

[10] Midday Prayer, 2019 Book of Common Prayer, Anglican Church in North America. Retrieved at: http://bcp2019.anglicanchurch.net/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/07-Midday-Prayer-11.21.2019.docx.

[11] Palmer, W. (2018). Exodus 21:33–22:15. In Books of the Bible Study Questions: Exodus (PDF ed., pp. 15). St. Louis, MO: Concordia Publishing House. Retrieved at: https://communication.cph.org/cs/c/?cta_guid=92e27822-804d-495b-bfb9-dd14d6cc54f7&signature=AAH58kG6sEZ-TtMS3FcknAqRT0cW_Z0q8g&pageId=12528320923&placement_guid=70b45675-728d-4e8a-bc7b-2d6e9bb12fe7&click=c4e1c108-c5ab-49a9-9781-1876ef154796&hsutk=3061eb4a02b38238bc14da6053e1ed65&canon=https%3A%2F%2Fcommunication.cph.org%2Fbooks-of-the-bible-study-questions%2Fthank-you&portal_id=487463&contentType=standard-page&redirect_url=APefjpEkqG1Qm5J7RrPY4EOEn-u4H4HZJlkr-l2wt91qWX7ZFJxGEp4CcuSEdpp33CdW9vViBsKpfaR8V3CkDtXrEQPdAq9QFhEd6rPY4hnvAvD8s-Eoj3b69ENxaeHlvqQU15CKi49jgFPY35JdTSW5EUHRYCfageGrD6TCzY0YTUvuUNyy44uYMUBc2r8eBvx8UsE_ssQPuyOrjBvR3evLrRu7oaTxUXSJwz76PWlViKTYNgWLYdckNZOF6mCatJriCbHQqr8Ogv_5Ys50z4A8EyDJnfd1oMsKWZP2w0qYMsPgWuL34QGXey6sBvJ17owTwYjp8CryFeJECPdIIFsCK286xxI5AtAumGhMvaB-Fwis_vzAVwN8-sH7OUPOIN9pSJFp4oq1&__hstc=25153893.3061eb4a02b38238bc14da6053e1ed65.1635429911978.1635429911978.1635429911978.1&__hssc=25153893.1.1635429911978&__hsfp=1921498206.

[12] Keener, C. S., Walton, J. H., & Matthews, V. A. (2016). Exodus. In NIV Cultural Backgrounds Study Bible (Kindle, pp. 603-604). essay, Zondervan.

[13] Ibid. 12, P. 604

[14] Ibid. 12, P. 604

[15] Ibid. 12, P. 604

[16] Palmer, W. (2018). Exodus 21:33–22:15. In Books of the Bible Study Questions: Exodus (PDF ed., pp. 15). St. Louis, MO: Concordia Publishing House. Retrieved at: https://communication.cph.org/cs/c/?cta_guid=92e27822-804d-495b-bfb9-dd14d6cc54f7&signature=AAH58kG6sEZ-TtMS3FcknAqRT0cW_Z0q8g&pageId=12528320923&placement_guid=70b45675-728d-4e8a-bc7b-2d6e9bb12fe7&click=c4e1c108-c5ab-49a9-9781-1876ef154796&hsutk=3061eb4a02b38238bc14da6053e1ed65&canon=https%3A%2F%2Fcommunication.cph.org%2Fbooks-of-the-bible-study-questions%2Fthank-you&portal_id=487463&contentType=standard-page&redirect_url=APefjpEkqG1Qm5J7RrPY4EOEn-u4H4HZJlkr-l2wt91qWX7ZFJxGEp4CcuSEdpp33CdW9vViBsKpfaR8V3CkDtXrEQPdAq9QFhEd6rPY4hnvAvD8s-Eoj3b69ENxaeHlvqQU15CKi49jgFPY35JdTSW5EUHRYCfageGrD6TCzY0YTUvuUNyy44uYMUBc2r8eBvx8UsE_ssQPuyOrjBvR3evLrRu7oaTxUXSJwz76PWlViKTYNgWLYdckNZOF6mCatJriCbHQqr8Ogv_5Ys50z4A8EyDJnfd1oMsKWZP2w0qYMsPgWuL34QGXey6sBvJ17owTwYjp8CryFeJECPdIIFsCK286xxI5AtAumGhMvaB-Fwis_vzAVwN8-sH7OUPOIN9pSJFp4oq1&__hstc=25153893.3061eb4a02b38238bc14da6053e1ed65.1635429911978.1635429911978.1635429911978.1&__hssc=25153893.1.1635429911978&__hsfp=1921498206.

[17] Ibid. 16

[18] Ibid. 16

[19] Episcopal Church. (1979). Daily Office, Rite II. In The Book of common prayer: And administration of the sacraments, and other rites and ceremonies of the church, according to the use of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States of America: Together with the psalter, or, Psalms of David (pp. 123). New York, NY: Church Publishing Incorporated.

[20] Palmer, W. (2017). Luke 10:25-37. In Books of the Bible Study Questions: Luke (PDF ed., pp. 12). St. Louis, MO: Concordia Publishing House. Retrieved at: https://communication.cph.org/cs/c/?cta_guid=ea430e3d-8fd1-4ef8-a8d6-e50670bf61d4&signature=AAH58kFbsZlpuNVeFmGfHeQYpFwnzliYYA&pageId=12528320923&placement_guid=3c6e265f-ade8-4c71-8bb0-ff13f3e21761&click=5fffb21d-b180-4aa8-94d9-2472e22d147c&hsutk=3061eb4a02b38238bc14da6053e1ed65&canon=https%3A%2F%2Fcommunication.cph.org%2Fbooks-of-the-bible-study-questions%2Fthank-you&portal_id=487463&contentType=standard-page&redirect_url=APefjpG9hqDqj9dhNLb3ClBP26LbXfAYieEEgB_qQRGLuzNnrVmqtglF4sjiYNhoIZaXBeIpmJ2cDkWnMMXNNkC6aeSqCMsFWIt5EeS4ghUNSrzDVqi59MvDL8QDYhwo8KSUU32C6Aufc-ct6d2HuX3-Bpz_gI3lx51MHg-S_TGM99zg6sWNQyAlP47NwLt0ArLy-AT-i22IJH9fMqdnpMdlQCKeYjwiJTNpsTj57km6IVkbTzm-I167PuFV2lbDt9wLe2CEkJJ-GnzhADou5Kk84BJXyr8u53BWcILA5EL5eAXCjrTy_wE51KJaZ0VoGKmuEM4QHykJ91P2IdI3GwadlI9x-KWGWZiUO4UwWEhlXCT06gT1vQ4&__hstc=25153893.3061eb4a02b38238bc14da6053e1ed65.1635429911978.1635429911978.1635429911978.1&__hssc=25153893.1.1635429911978&__hsfp=1921498206.

[21] Ibid. 20, P. 12-13

[22] Ibid. 20, P. 13

[23] Ibid. 20, P. 13

[24] Academic Community of St. Athanasius Academy of Orthodox Theology (2008). Matthew. In The Orthodox study Bible (p. 1343). Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson.

[25] Cole, J. (Ed.). (2015). Luke. In Didache Bible: With commentaries based on the Catechism of the Catholic Church (Kindle ed., p. 3127). Downers Grove, IL: Midwest Theological Forum, Ignatius Press.

[26] Episcopal Church. (1979). Daily Office, Rite II. In The Book of common prayer: And administration of the sacraments, and other rites and ceremonies of the church, according to the use of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States of America: Together with the psalter, or, Psalms of David (pp. 134). New York, NY: Church Publishing Incorporated.

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