August 28 Devotional (2021)

“So he was there with the LORD forty days and forty nights. He neither ate bread nor drank water. And he wrote on the tablets the words of the covenant, the Ten Commandments.”

August 28, 2021
Ordinary Time

Today’s Readings:   Exodus 34:8-28 / John 18:28-32 / “Not a Word” (Traditional)


A prayer inspired by Saint Augustine of Hippo, Bishop of Hippo and Teacher of the Faith, who the Church remembers on August 28th

O Lord God, who art the light of the minds that know thee, the Life of the souls that love thee, and the strength of the hearts that serve thee: Help us, following the example of thy servant Augustine of Hippo, so to know thee that we may truly love thee, and so to love thee that we may fully serve thee, whom to serve is perfect freedom; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who liveth and reigneth with thee and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever. Amen.


Invitatory 

Come, O child of God. Come and drink from the well of God’s Word. Refresh your soul, revive your mind, renew your hope. 

The Apostles’ Creed

I believe in God, the Father almighty,

    maker of heaven and earth;

And in Jesus Christ his only Son our Lord;

    who was conceived by the Holy Ghost,

    born of the Virgin Mary,

    suffered under Pontius Pilate,

    was crucified, dead, and buried.

    He descended into hell.

    The third day he rose again from the dead.

    He ascended into heaven,

    and sitteth on the right hand of God the Father almighty.

    From thence he shall come to judge the quick and the dead.

I believe in the Holy Ghost,

    the holy catholic Church,

    the communion of saints,

    the forgiveness of sins,

    the resurrection of the body,

    and the life everlasting. Amen.

Hymn

“I Need Thee Every Hour” 

by Annie Hawks

Lyrics:

I need Thee every hour, 

Most gracious Lord; 

No tender voice like Thine 

Can peace afford. 

I need Thee, O I need Thee; 

Every hour I need Thee! 

O bless me now, my Savior, 

I come to Thee! 

I need Thee every hour, 

Stay Thou near by; 

Temptations lose their power 

When Thou art nigh. 

I need Thee, O I need Thee; 

Every hour I need Thee! 

O bless me now, my Savior, 

I come to Thee! 

I need Thee every hour, 

In joy or pain; 

Come quickly and abide, 

Or life is vain. 

I need Thee, O I need Thee; 

Every hour I need Thee! 

O bless me now, my Savior, 

I come to Thee! 

I need Thee every hour, 

Most Holy One; 

O make me Thine indeed, 

Thou blessed Son. 

I need Thee, O I need Thee; 

Every hour I need Thee! 

O bless me now, my Savior,

I come to Thee! [1]


Morning Lorica

Lorica from the Martyrology of Óengus, Early 9th century

“Lorica” was originally the word for a breastplate that a Roman soldier would wear. Loricas were prayers for protection—sometimes praying for protection from every angle, or protection for every part of the body.” [2]

Deliver me, O Jesus, my body and soul, from every evil that exists, that offends on the earth.

Deliver me, O Jesus, O Lord of fair assemblies, as you delivered Elijah, with Enoch, from the world.

Deliver me, O Jesus, from every ill on earth, as you delivered Noah, son of Lamech, from the flood.

Deliver me, O Jesus, O King of pure brightness, as you delivered Abraham from the hand of the Chaldeans.

Deliver me, O Jesus, O King mysterious, gracious, as you delivered Lot from the sin of the cities.

Deliver me, O Jesus, O King high, wonderful, as you delivered Jonah from the belly of the great whale.

Deliver me, O Jesus, in your many-graced kingdom, as you delivered Isaac from his father’s hands….

Deliver me, O Jesus, from every evil,… as you delivered John from the serpent’s venom.

Deliver me, O Jesus, from hell with its misery, as you delivered David from the valor of Goliath’s sword. …

Deliver me, O Jesus, for the sake of your suffering, as you delivered Nineveh in the time of the plague.

Deliver me, O Jesus, I desire that you acknowledge me, as you delivered the people of Israel on mount Gilboa.

Deliver me, O Jesus, O Lord most divine, as you delivered Daniel out of the lions’ den.

Deliver me, O Jesus, O King famous, gentle, as you delivered Moses from the hand of Pharaoh.

Deliver me, O Jesus, as you have done great marvels, as you delivered the Three Children from the fiery furnace. …

Deliver me, O Jesus, … as you delivered Paul and Peter before kings from the vengeance of the prison.

Deliver me, O Jesus, from the anguish of every disease, as you delivered Job from the devil’s tribulations.

Deliver me, O Jesus, O Christ let there not be neglect, as you delivered David from Saul, from his accusation. …

Deliver me, O Jesus, O King most blessed, as you delivered Israel with holiness from the slavery of Egypt.

Deliver me, O Jesus, for my covenant is with you, as you delivered Peter from the waves of the sea….

Deliver me, O Jesus. Everlasting are your miracles. …

I have commemorated the kingfolk around the King above the clouds. Amen.

– Lorica from the Martyrology of Óengus [3]

Short Verse

Early in the morning I cry out to you,* for in your words is my trust.

Psalm 119:147
Statue of Moses by Herman Vilhelm Bissen, 13.10.1798-10.3.1868 near church of our lady in Copenhagen
(source)

Morning Reading: Exodus 34:8-28

The covenant renewed

8 And Moses quickly bowed his head toward the earth and worshiped. 9 And he said, “If now I have found favor in your sight, O Lord, please let the Lord go in the midst of us, for it is a stiff-necked people, and pardon our iniquity and our sin, and take us for your inheritance.”

10 And he said, “Behold, I am making a covenant. Before all your people I will do marvels, such as have not been created in all the earth or in any nation. And all the people among whom you are shall see the work of the LORD, for it is an awesome thing that I will do with you.

11 “Observe what I command you this day. Behold, I will drive out before you the Amorites, the Canaanites, the Hittites, the Perizzites, the Hivites, and the Jebusites. 12 Take care, lest you make a covenant with the inhabitants of the land to which you go, lest it become a snare in your midst. 13 You shall tear down their altars and break their pillars and cut down their Asherim 14 (for you shall worship no other god, for the LORD, whose name is Jealous, is a jealous God), 15 lest you make a covenant with the inhabitants of the land, and when they whore after their gods and sacrifice to their gods and you are invited, you eat of his sacrifice, 16 and you take of their daughters for your sons, and their daughters whore after their gods and make your sons whore after their gods.

17 “You shall not make for yourself any gods of cast metal.

18 “You shall keep the Feast of Unleavened Bread. Seven days you shall eat unleavened bread, as I commanded you, at the time appointed in the month Abib, for in the month Abib you came out from Egypt. 19 All that open the womb are mine, all your male livestock, the firstborn of cow and sheep. 20 The firstborn of a donkey you shall redeem with a lamb, or if you will not redeem it you shall break its neck. All the firstborn of your sons you shall redeem. And none shall appear before me empty-handed.

21 “Six days you shall work, but on the seventh day you shall rest. In plowing time and in harvest you shall rest. 22 You shall observe the Feast of Weeks, the firstfruits of wheat harvest, and the Feast of Ingathering at the year’s end. 23 Three times in the year shall all your males appear before the LORD God, the God of Israel. 24 For I will cast out nations before you and enlarge your borders; no one shall covet your land, when you go up to appear before the LORD your God three times in the year.

25 “You shall not offer the blood of my sacrifice with anything leavened, or let the sacrifice of the Feast of the Passover remain until the morning. 26 The best of the firstfruits of your ground you shall bring to the house of the LORD your God. You shall not boil a young goat in its mother’s milk.”

27 And the LORD said to Moses, “Write these words, for in accordance with these words I have made a covenant with you and with Israel.” 28 So he was there with the LORD forty days and forty nights. He neither ate bread nor drank water. And he wrote on the tablets the words of the covenant, the Ten Commandments.

Morning Lesson

Redemption through sacrifice foreshadowed 

“God told the Israelites not to join in religious rites with the sinful people around them, but to give their absolute loyalty and exclusive devotion to him. Pagan worship simply cannot be mixed with the worship of the holy God. As Jesus pointed out, ‘No servant can serve two masters. . . . Ye cannot serve God and mammon’ (Luke 16:13). Mammon—the love of money—is the god of this age, and many Christians attempt to make a treaty with this enslaving god. Are you trying to worship two gods at once? Where is your first allegiance?” [4]

“Asherah poles [v. 15] were wooden poles planted beside Baal’s altar (see Judges 6:25).” [5] Asherah “was commonly the sister-wife to the storm god Baal… At Ugarit, she was consort to the god El and mother of other gods, including Baal. (An inscription at Kuntillet ‘Ajrud names her as a consort to ‘Yahweh of Samaria,’ illustrating the mixing of religions in the Northern Kingdom.) Asherah was associated with the sea but was honored most as goddess of fertility. Asherah (Ashtoreth) is also associated with Babylonian Ishtar. The Bible notes that Asherah was worshiped in association with trees, groves, and wooden poles… She was often portrayed in carved wooden figurines with her female characteristics featured prominently. Archaeologists associate Asherah with the numerous fertility figurines discovered throughout Canaan. Most Near Eastern religions had a male deity and a female deity as a couple; worship practices for Baal and Asherah were sexual in nature. Later, the cult was so popular, Judean artisans developed their own style in depicting such fertility goddesses. The only era when such figurines are not found is the period after the return from exile, illustrating how effective the religious reforms were under Ezra and Nehemiah.” [6]

“God’s prohibition against intermarriage [v. 16] was not a matter of prejudice. The influence of immoral religious practices was subtle, pervasive, and unrelenting. Intermarriage would be the quickest route to compromise with false religion and immoral behavior.” [7]

In verses 22–24, “the commands of the three annual feasts are repeated from 23:14–17. Faithful participation in these feasts was linked to God’s promise in v. 24 to preserve the people in the land.” [8]

Verse 24 says, For I will cast out nations before you and enlarge your borders; no one shall covet your land, when you go up to appear before the LORD your God three times in the year. “God’s promise here is contingent on obedience. If Israel was united and faithful to God, no one would attempt to take their land, even when they were worshiping at these festivals.” [9]

“The period of forty days and forty nights [v. 28] matched Moses’ earlier pilgrimage to Sinai (see 24:18)… A person can survive without food for weeks. But no one can go without water for more than three or four days. If Moses drank no water for 40 days, then we must view his continued existence as a miracle of the Lord.” [10] 

“Sinners are unable to keep God’s holy commands perfectly. We rebel against them in our thoughts, words, and deeds. If left up to us, we could not live in God’s covenant. Here, in the middle of the worship provisions of the covenant, God foreshadows His solution: redemption through sacrifice (v 20). The blood of the Lamb redeems those who continually break the covenant. He died for us that we might live. • Lord Jesus, Lamb of God, I am grateful for Your sacrifice. Strengthen me by Your Spirit to worship You properly. Amen.” [11]


Midday Prayer

Of Mary, the Blessed Mother

Father in heaven, by your grace the virgin mother of your incarnate Son was blessed in bearing him, but still more blessed in keeping your word: Grant us who honor the exaltation of her lowliness to follow the example of her devotion to your will; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen. [12]

Short Verse

My soul has a desire and longing for the courts of the LORD;* my heart and my flesh rejoice in the living God.

Psalm 84:1
“The high priests before Pilate”
By Duccio
(source)

Midday Reading: John 18:28-32

Ritual defilement and the Passover

28 Then they led Jesus from the house of Caiaphas to the governor’s headquarters.f It was early morning. They themselves did not enter the governor’s headquarters, so that they would not be defiled, but could eat the Passover. 29 So Pilate went outside to them and said, “What accusation do you bring against this man?” 30 They answered him, “If this man were not doing evil, we would not have delivered him over to you.” 31 Pilate said to them, “Take him yourselves and judge him by your own law.” The Jews said to him, “It is not lawful for us to put anyone to death.” 32 This was to fulfill the word that Jesus had spoken to show by what kind of death he was going to die.

Midday Lesson

Jesus Before Pilate

“St. John Chrysostom note[d] the irony that Christ’s accusers did not fear being defiled by condemning an innocent Man to death, but would not set foot into a court of justice.” [13] He wrote, “What madness! Why don’t you mention his evil deeds instead of concealing them? Why don’t you prove the evil? See how they always avoid direct accusations that would amount to nothing anyway. Annas questioned [Jesus] about his doctrine, and having heard him, sent him to Caiaphas. After Caiaphas questioned him and discovered nothing, he sent him to Pilate. Pilate asks, ‘What accusation do you bring against this man?’ Here too they have nothing to say but again employ conjectures,” (Homilies on the Gospel of John). [14]

“Since the chief priests of the Jews had no actual crime with which to make an accusation against Jesus (vv. 29, 30), Pilate refused to pass judgement. When the chief priests say, ‘It is not lawful for us to put anyone to death,’ they are not referring to the Law of Moses, but to the laws of Romasn occupation, for the Romans reserved the right to execute people. Thus, the chief priests relied on Pilate to sentence Jesus to death.” [15]

“The Jewish law prescribed stoning as the usual means of execution. However, Christ had prophesied He would be killed by being lifted up on the Cross (3:14; 8:28; 12:32, 33), having foreknowledge that He would die, not at the hands of the Jews, but by the Roman method of crucifixion.” [16]


Eventide Prayer

In the evening hours, we call upon you, O Lord, to receive our prayers and to pardon our sins; you reign forever. Amen. [17]

Short Verse

Blessed be the LORD, the God of Israel, from everlasting and to everlasting;* and let all the people say, “Amen!” Hallelujah!

Psalm 106:48
“The King’s Crown”
By Aaron Spong
(source)

Eventide Reading

“Not a Word” (Traditional)

They crucified my Lord,

And he never said a mumbling word

Not a word, not a word, not a word.

They nailed him to the tree

And he never said a mumbling word

Not a word, not a word, not a word.

They pierced him in the side

And he never said a mumbling word

Not a word, not a word, not a word.

He bowed his head and died

And he never said a mumbling word

Not a word, not a word, not a word.

[18]

Compline Prayer

I will not lie down tonight with sin, nor shall sin, nor sin’s shadow, lie down with me…

*  Be it on Thine own beloved arm, O God of grace, that I in peace shall waken. Amen. [19]


Devotionals compiled/written by S. P. Rogers

Citations:

[1] Timeless Truths Free Online Library | books, sheet music. (n.d.). I need thee every hour. I Need Thee Every Hour > Lyrics | Annie S. Hawks. https://library.timelesstruths.org/music/I_Need_Thee_Every_Hour/

[2] Stratman, P. (2001). Loricas. In Prayers from the Ancient Celtic Church (Kindle ed., p. 1). Crossway.

[3] Ibid. 2, P. 7-8

[4] Tyndale House Publishers, Inc. (2013). Study Notes: Exodus. In Life application study Bible: King James version (Kindle ed., p. 6677). Carol Stream, IL: Tyndale House.

[5] Ibid. 4, P. 6677-6678

[6] A., E. E. (2016). Exodus. In The Lutheran study Bible: English standard version (Kindle ed., pp. 885). Saint Louis: Concordia Publishing House.

[7] Radmacher, E. D., Allen, R. B., & House, H. W. (2018). Exodus. In Holy Bible Nkjv Study Bible, Personal Size: Full-color Edition (Kindle, Third, p. 646). essay, Thomas Nelson, Inc. 

[8] Ibid. 7, P. 647

[9] A., E. E. (2016). Exodus. In The Lutheran study Bible: English standard version (Kindle ed., pp. 886). Saint Louis: Concordia Publishing House.

[10] Radmacher, E. D., Allen, R. B., & House, H. W. (2018). Exodus. In Holy Bible Nkjv Study Bible, Personal Size: Full-color Edition (Kindle, Third, p. 647). essay, Thomas Nelson, Inc. 

[11] A., E. E. (2016). Exodus. In The Lutheran study Bible: English standard version (Kindle ed., pp. 887). Saint Louis: Concordia Publishing House.

[12] Episcopal Church. (1979). Collects. In The Book of common prayer: And administration of the sacraments, and other rites and ceremonies of the church, according to the use of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States of America: Together with the psalter, or, Psalms of David (pp. 241). New York, NY: Church Publishing Incorporated.

[13] Academic Community of St. Athanasius Academy of Orthodox Theology (2008). John. In The Orthodox study Bible (p. 1491). Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson.

[14] Chrysostom. (2019). John. In Ancient faith study Bible (Kindle ed., p. 3076). Nashville: Holman Bible.

[15] Academic Community of St. Athanasius Academy of Orthodox Theology (2008). John. In The Orthodox study Bible (p. 1491). Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson.

[16] Ibid. 15, P. 1492

[17] Stratman, P. C. (Trans.). (2018). Office of Vespers. In The Antiphonary of Bangor and The Divine Offices of Bangor: The Liturgy of Hours of the ancient Irish church (Kindle, p. 147). essay, Crossway. 

[18] Tickle, P. (2000). August. In The divine hours: Prayers for Summertime (Kindle ed., vol. 2, p. 452). New York, NY: Image Books.

[19] The Northumbria Community. (2015). Compline. In Celtic Daily Prayer (Kindle ed., p. 92172). London: HarperCollins.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

Create your website with WordPress.com
Get started
%d bloggers like this: