August 23 Devotional (2021)

“Husband and wife belong to each other as martyrs, they belong to God as royalty, and they are called to treat each other accordingly.”

August 23, 2021
Ordinary Time

Today’s Readings:  Psalm 119:97-104 / Nehemiah 9:1-31 / Ephesians 5:21—6:9

Invitatory 

Come, O child of God. Come and drink from the well of God’s Word. Refresh your soul, revive your mind, renew your hope. 

Collect of the Week

Grant, O merciful God, that your Church, being gathered together in unity by your Holy Spirit, may show forth your power among all peoples, to the glory of your Name; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen. [1]

Hymn

“Love Divine, All Loves Excelling” 

by Charles Wesley

Lyrics:

Love Divine, all loves excelling, 

Joy of heaven, to earth come down, 

Fix in us your humble dwelling, 

All your faithful mercies crown! 

Jesus, you are all compassion, 

Pure, unbounded love thou art; 

Visit us with your salvation, 

Enter every trembling heart. 

Come, Almighty to deliver, 

Let us all your life receive; 

Suddenly return and never, 

Nevermore your temples leave. 

You we would be always blessing, 

Serve you as your hosts above; 

Pray, and praise you without ceasing, 

Glory in your perfect love. 

Finish, then, your new creation; 

Pure and spotless let us be; 

Let us see your great salvation 

Perfectly restored in thee; 

Changed from glory into glory, 

Till in heaven we take our place, 

Till we cast our crowns before thee, 

Lost in wonder, love, and praise. [2]


Morning Lorica

St. Patrick’s Breastplate 

“’Lorica’ was originally the word for a breastplate that a Roman soldier would wear. Loricas were prayers for protection—sometimes praying for protection from every angle, or protection for every part of the body. St. Patrick’s Breastplate is also known as ‘The Lorica.'” [3]

I bind unto myself today

The strong Name of the Trinity,

By invocation of the same,

The Three in One and One in Three.

I bind this day to me for ever.

By power of faith, Christ’s incarnation;

His baptism in the Jordan river;

His death on Cross for my salvation;

His bursting from the spicèd tomb;

His riding up the heavenly way;

His coming at the day of doom;*

I bind unto myself today.

I bind unto myself the power

Of the great love of the cherubim;

The sweet ‘well done’ in judgment hour,

The service of the seraphim,

Confessors’ faith, Apostles’ word,

The Patriarchs’ prayers, the Prophets’ scrolls,

All good deeds done unto the Lord,

And purity of virgin souls.

I bind unto myself today

The virtues of the starlit heaven,

The glorious sun’s life-giving ray,

The whiteness of the moon at even,

The flashing of the lightning free,

The whirling wind’s tempestuous shocks,

The stable earth, the deep salt sea,

Around the old eternal rocks.

I bind unto myself today

The power of God to hold and lead,

His eye to watch, His might to stay,

His ear to hearken to my need.

The wisdom of my God to teach,

His hand to guide, His shield to ward,

The word of God to give me speech,

His heavenly host to be my guard.

Against the demon snares of sin,

The vice that gives temptation force,

The natural lusts that war within,

The hostile men that mar my course;

Or few or many, far or nigh,

In every place and in all hours,

Against their fierce hostility,

I bind to me these holy powers.

Against all Satan’s spells and wiles,

Against false words of heresy,

Against the knowledge that defiles,

Against the heart’s idolatry,

Against the wizard’s evil craft,

Against the death wound and the burning,

The choking wave and the poisoned shaft,

Protect me, Christ, till Thy returning.

Christ be with me,

Christ within me,

Christ behind me,

Christ before me,

Christ beside me,

Christ to win me,

Christ to comfort and restore me.

Christ beneath me,

Christ above me,

Christ in quiet,

Christ in danger,

Christ in hearts of all that love me,

Christ in mouth of friend and stranger.

I bind unto myself the Name,

The strong Name of the Trinity;

By invocation of the same.

The Three in One, and One in Three,

Of Whom all nature hath creation,

Eternal Father, Spirit, Word:

Praise to the Lord of my salvation,

Salvation is of Christ the Lord.

Amen.

– St. Patrick’s Breastplate [4]

Short Verse

Show us the light of your countenance, O God,* and come to us.

based on Psalm 67:1
“Bird on tree eating fruit”
By Donodio
(source)

Morning Reading: Psalm 119:97-104

God’s word is sweet

Oh, how I love your law!

It is my meditation all day long.

Your commandment makes me wiser than my enemies,

for it is always with me.

I have more understanding than all my teachers,

for your decrees are my meditation.

I understand more than the aged,

for I keep your precepts.

I hold back my feet from every evil way,

in order to keep your word.

I do not turn away from your ordinances,

for you have taught me.

How sweet are your words to my taste,

sweeter than honey to my mouth!

Through your precepts I get understanding;

therefore I hate every false way.


Midday Prayer

Of the Holy Spirit

Almighty and most merciful God, grant that by the indwelling of your Holy Spirit we may be enlightened and strengthened for your service; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with you, in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever. Amen. [5] 

Short Verse

Let the heavens rejoice, and let the earth be glad; let the sea thunder and all that is in it;* let the field be joyful and all that is therein.

Psalm 96:11
“Nehemiah rebuilding Jerusalem” 
illustration by Adolf Hult, 1919
(source)

Midday Reading: Nehemiah 9:1-31

God’s care of the people

1 Now on the twenty-fourth day of this month the people of Israel were assembled with fasting and in sackcloth, and with earth on their heads. 2 And the Israelites separated themselves from all foreigners and stood and confessed their sins and the iniquities of their fathers. 3 And they stood up in their place and read from the Book of the Law of the LORD their God for a quarter of the day; for another quarter of it they made confession and worshiped the LORD their God. 4 On the stairs of the Levites stood Jeshua, Bani, Kadmiel, Shebaniah, Bunni, Sherebiah, Bani, and Chenani; and they cried with a loud voice to the LORD their God. 5 Then the Levites, Jeshua, Kadmiel, Bani, Hashabneiah, Sherebiah, Hodiah, Shebaniah, and Pethahiah, said, “Stand up and bless the LORD your God from everlasting to everlasting. Blessed be your glorious name, which is exalted above all blessing and praise.

6  “You are the LORD, you alone. You have made heaven, the heaven of heavens, with all their host, the earth and all that is on it, the seas and all that is in them; and you preserve all of them; and the host of heaven worships you. 7 You are the LORD, the God who chose Abram and brought him out of Ur of the Chaldeans and gave him the name Abraham. 8 You found his heart faithful before you, and made with him the covenant to give to his offspring the land of the Canaanite, the Hittite, the Amorite, the Perizzite, the Jebusite, and the Girgashite. And you have kept your promise, for you are righteous.

9 “And you saw the affliction of our fathers in Egypt and heard their cry at the Red Sea, 10 and performed signs and wonders against Pharaoh and all his servants and all the people of his land, for you knew that they acted arrogantly against our fathers. And you made a name for yourself, as it is to this day. 11 And you divided the sea before them, so that they went through the midst of the sea on dry land, and you cast their pursuers into the depths, as a stone into mighty waters. 12 By a pillar of cloud you led them in the day, and by a pillar of fire in the night to light for them the way in which they should go. 13 You came down on Mount Sinai and spoke with them from heaven and gave them right rules and true laws, good statutes and commandments, 14 and you made known to them your holy Sabbath and commanded them commandments and statutes and a law by Moses your servant. 15 You gave them bread from heaven for their hunger and brought water for them out of the rock for their thirst, and you told them to go in to possess the land that you had sworn to give them.

16 “But they and our fathers acted presumptuously and stiffened their neck and did not obey your commandments. 17 They refused to obey and were not mindful of the wonders that you performed among them, but they stiffened their neck and appointed a leader to return to their slavery in Egypt. But you are a God ready to forgive, gracious and merciful, slow to anger and abounding in steadfast love, and did not forsake them. 18 Even when they had made for themselves a golden calf and said, ‘This is your God who brought you up out of Egypt,’ and had committed great blasphemies, 19 you in your great mercies did not forsake them in the wilderness. The pillar of cloud to lead them in the way did not depart from them by day, nor the pillar of fire by night to light for them the way by which they should go. 20 You gave your good Spirit to instruct them and did not withhold your manna from their mouth and gave them water for their thirst. 21 Forty years you sustained them in the wilderness, and they lacked nothing. Their clothes did not wear out and their feet did not swell.

22 “And you gave them kingdoms and peoples and allotted to them every corner. So they took possession of the land of Sihon king of Heshbon and the land of Og king of Bashan. 23 You multiplied their children as the stars of heaven, and you brought them into the land that you had told their fathers to enter and possess. 24 So the descendants went in and possessed the land, and you subdued before them the inhabitants of the land, the Canaanites, and gave them into their hand, with their kings and the peoples of the land, that they might do with them as they would. 25 And they captured fortified cities and a rich land, and took possession of houses full of all good things, cisterns already hewn, vineyards, olive orchards and fruit trees in abundance. So they ate and were filled and became fat and delighted themselves in your great goodness.

26 “Nevertheless, they were disobedient and rebelled against you and cast your law behind their back and killed your prophets, who had warned them in order to turn them back to you, and they committed great blasphemies. 27 Therefore you gave them into the hand of their enemies, who made them suffer. And in the time of their suffering they cried out to you and you heard them from heaven, and according to your great mercies you gave them saviors who saved them from the hand of their enemies. 28 But after they had rest they did evil again before you, and you abandoned them to the hand of their enemies, so that they had dominion over them. Yet when they turned and cried to you, you heard from heaven, and many times you delivered them according to your mercies. 29 And you warned them in order to turn them back to your law. Yet they acted presumptuously and did not obey your commandments, but sinned against your rules, which if a person does them, he shall live by them, and they turned a stubborn shoulder and stiffened their neck and would not obey. 30 Many years you bore with them and warned them by your Spirit through your prophets. Yet they would not give ear. Therefore you gave them into the hand of the peoples of the lands. 31 Nevertheless, in your great mercies you did not make an end of them or forsake them, for you are a gracious and merciful God.

Midday Lesson

The People of Israel Confess Their Sin

Nehemiah authored this book, which was written around 445 to 425 BC. [6] “In the same spirit as Ezra, Nehemiah held a deep faith in God’s promises. He was committed to the well-being of his fellow Jews and to the shaping of the Jewish religious community after the return from the Babylonian exile. He helped restore their hope as God’s chosen people.” [7]

The book of Nehemiah “is about rebuilding the walls and gates of Jerusalem. Nehemiah, inspired by God, was the motivator and driving force behind this restoration. Serving as governor, he introduced administrative reforms needed to restore political stability. This occurred during the time that Ezra, priest and scribe, was working to reestablish the Mosaic Law as the spiritual center of the newly forming Jewish communities. Nehemiah was neither priest nor prophet, but a layman dedicated to God and to serving His people. He sets an example of discernment and dedication, patience and perseverance, being guided by prayer and love. And all this in the face of treacherous external enemies, and even some enemies opposed to the will of God from within.” [8]

[9]

“When Nehemiah arrived in Jerusalem he found more than just broken walls; he found broken lives. In response, Nehemiah gathers the people together to hear Ezra read God’s law. The people repent and promise to change their lives by obeying God’s words. No matter where we live, backsliding is an ever-present danger. We must constantly check our behavior against God’s standards in the Bible so that we do not slide back into sinful ways of living.” [10]

[11]
[12]

In today’s passage from Nehemiah, “the people of Judah gathered together on the Day of Atonement to confess their sins against the Law.” [13]

“Having heard the word of God, the faithful are convicted of their sins and moved to repentance, fasting, confession, and prayer. Note they confessed not privately, but in the midst of those assembled together (see Jam 5:16).” [14]

“Fasting, wearing burlap, and sprinkling dust on the head were public signs of sorrow and repentance.” [15] “The Hebrews practiced open confession, admitting their sins to one another. Reading and studying God’s Word should precede confession (see Neh 8:18) because God can show us where we are sinning. Honest confession should precede worship, because we cannot have a right relationship with God if we hold on to certain sins.” [16]

“Seeing how God continued to be with his people [vv. 16-21] shows that his patience is amazing! In spite of our repeated failings, pride, and stubbornness, he is always ready to forgive (Neh 9:17), and his Spirit is always ready to instruct (Neh 9:20). Realizing the extent of God’s forgiveness helps us forgive those who fail us, even ‘seventy times seven’ if necessary (Matt 18:21-22).” [17]

“The prayer of Ezra [vv. 6-38] follows the same biblical pattern of praise, remembrance for God’s works, and petition. The same pattern is followed in the Eucharistic prayers of the Divine Liturgy.” [18]

“Many prayers and speeches in the Bible include a long summary of Israel’s history because individuals did not have their own copies of the Bible as we do today. This summary of God’s past works reminded the people of their great heritage and God’s promises.” [19]

“Remembering our personal history can certainly help us to avoid repeating our mistakes so that we can serve God better. Reviewing our past helps us understand how to improve our behavior. It shows us the pattern to our spiritual growth. Learn from your past so that you will become the kind of person God wants you to be.” [20]

“Israel was devastated by times of intense rebellion and sin. Yet when the people repented and returned to God, he delivered them. God puts no limit on the number of times we can come to him to obtain mercy, but we must come in order to obtain it, recognizing our need and asking him for help. This miracle of grace should inspire us to say, “What a gracious and merciful God you are!” If there is a recurring problem or difficulty in your life, continue to ask God for help, and be willing and ready to make changes in your attitude and behavior that will correct that situation.” [21]

[22]
[23]
[24]

Eventide Prayer

Yours, O Lord, is the day; yours also is the night; grant that the Sun of Righteousness may abide always in our hearts, to drive away all wicked thoughts and to relieve our fears, that we may always know the light of Jesus’ presence. Amen. [25]

Short Verse

I am the LORD your God, who brought you out of the land of Egypt and said,* “Open your mouth wide, and I will fill it.”

Psalm 81:10
Two photographs taken on the same bench, fifty years apart

Eventide Reading: Ephesians 5:21—6:9

A household code

 …21 submitting to one another out of reverence for Christ.

Wives and Husbands

22 Wives, submit to your own husbands, as to the Lord. 23 For the husband is the head of the wife even as Christ is the head of the church, his body, and is himself its Savior. 24 Now as the church submits to Christ, so also wives should submit in everything to their husbands.

25 Husbands, love your wives, as Christ loved the church and gave himself up for her, 26 that he might sanctify her, having cleansed her by the washing of water with the word, 27 so that he might present the church to himself in splendor, without spot or wrinkle or any such thing, that she might be holy and without blemish. 28 In the same way husbands should love their wives as their own bodies. He who loves his wife loves himself. 29 For no one ever hated his own flesh, but nourishes and cherishes it, just as Christ does the church, 30 because we are members of his body. 31 “Therefore a man shall leave his father and mother and hold fast to his wife, and the two shall become one flesh.” 32 This mystery is profound, and I am saying that it refers to Christ and the church. 33 However, let each one of you love his wife as himself, and let the wife see that she respects her husband.

Children and Parents

1 Children, obey your parents in the Lord, for this is right. 2 “Honor your father and mother” (this is the first commandment with a promise), 3 “that it may go well with you and that you may live long in the land.” 4 Fathers, do not provoke your children to anger, but bring them up in the discipline and instruction of the Lord.

Bondservants and Masters

5 Bondservants, obey your earthly masters with fear and trembling, with a sincere heart, as you would Christ, 6 not by the way of eye-service, as people-pleasers, but as bondservants of Christ, doing the will of God from the heart, 7 rendering service with a good will as to the Lord and not to man, 8 knowing that whatever good anyone does, this he will receive back from the Lord, whether he is a bondservant or is free. 9 Masters, do the same to them, and stop your threatening, knowing that he who is both their Masterc and yours is in heaven, and that there is no partiality with him.

Eventide Lesson

Mutual submission in marriage 

“The message of Ephesians has two parts. The first or doctrinal section (1:15–4:24) unfolds the church as the fulfillment of God’s plan for salvation, inaugurated in Christ. A second section (4:25–6:20) contains ethical ‘imperatives’ concerning the daily conduct of believers, providing practical applications of Paul’s teaching.” [26] “Ephesians 5 illustrates how the teaching of the letter on the church has practical consequences in the daily lives of believers. Ephesians 5:1 says, “So be imitators of God, as beloved children, and live in love.” This could be the summary of the whole of Christian life. The author of Ephesians draws out some implications of imitating God by living in love.” [27]

Ephesians 5:22-33 is “among Paul’s most misunderstood texts.” [28] “This passage on the relationship between a husband and a wife reflects the sacramental nature of Holy Matrimony.” [29] The early Christians related “to one another in ways already established by the wider society. So, for example, wives and husbands, children and parents, slaves and masters [noted in Ephesians 5] all follow[ed] norms of the Greco-Roman society in which they liv[ed], norms that give some direction about the rights and duties of people who [were] in these kinds of relationships with one another.” [30]

In Ephesians, Paul “adopts and adapts the traditional philosophical approach to household life that is at least as old as Aristotle, and that we call ‘household rules.’ In ordinary Greco-Roman society the lines of authority and of subservience were clearly drawn. Husbands, parents, and masters all [had] great power over wives, children, and slaves in a rigid social hierarchy. Of course, we must remember that the categories were not so clean: some women and children were slaves and some women owned slaves, both male and female. Some of the children referred to here may have been adults with living fathers, thus slave owners themselves.” [31]

However, “against the customs of his day, Paul portrayed husband and wife as partners with equal dignity.” [32] “The model is Christ and the Church (v. 32), which is then applied to marriage. Yet Christian marriage helps us to understand the mystery of the Church.” [33] “Spouses reflect the love of Christ, who is the Bridegroom, and the Church, his Bride. Moreover, the spousal relationship between a husband and a wife draws strength and unity from union with Christ through prayer and the Sacraments. Together they form one flesh, an indissoluble and exclusive union marked by sacrificial and faithful love toward each other.” [34] “As Christians are one Body in Christ, so also husbands and wives are one flesh (v 31).” [35]

“In both the Church and marriage, there is one who acts as head, who leads. As Man, Christ is first among equals, not superior to us in nature; yet He alone is the head of the church (v. 23). Likewise, wives are called to submit to their husbands as equals.” [36]

While Paul wrote just three sentences to wives, he wrote “at greater length to impress on husbands that they should love their wives.” [37] “Paul’s word to the husband is far longer than to the wife… it is an opportunity to rejoice in the Gospel. Christ’s marriage to the Church is a major Gospel image in the NT (Mt 9:15; 25:1–13; 2Co 11:2; Rv 21:9). If the husband’s love for his wife is Christlike, he is willing to give up his very life for her (Gal 2:20; Ti 2:14; 1Jn 3:16).” [38] 

Verse 26 tells us that Christ gave His life for the Church that he might sanctify her, having cleansed her by the washing of water with the word. “According to this image of Baptism, men are to cherish and love their wives just as Christ loves and sanctifies his Church.” [39] “Christ endured his Passion and Death out of complete love for all people. Husbands, too, must stand ready to sacrifice everything, even their very lives, for their wives.” [40] This, however, does not suggest that a husband’s sacrificial love for his wife is singularly to, possibly, one day, die for her. Rather, he must live for her also; he must “love and value the spouse God gave to him.” [41] He must sacrifice himself daily for his wife (and she for her husband). 

“In modern society, as well as in Christendom, a recurring debate concerns the tension between equality of the partners in marriage and office or order in marriage. Often, this tension has turned into a polarity between men and women, and sometimes even breeds hostility.” [42] This has even resulted in heresy, such as Eternal (Functional) Subordination of the Son (ESS/EFS) which began as an attempt to stave off feminism in 20th century culture, and teaches that there exists a “ranking within the Godhead” as “part of the sublime beauty and logic of true deity,” perverting the relationship between the Persons of the Holy Trinity. [43]

But Paul is clear: both husbands and wives are called to submission. “In contrast to the culture of the time, the husband is told not to rule his wife but to love her (cf Col 3:19).” [44] “There is nothing here to suggest the wife is oppressed in marriage, any more than one would call the Church oppressed in relationship to Christ. He who calls us ‘brethren’ (Heb 2:11) and ‘friends’ (Jn 15:15) exhorts the husband to love his wife, to nourish and cherish her as He Himself does the Church (vv. 28, 29).” [45] “Husband and wife belong to each other as martyrs, they belong to God as royalty, and they are called to treat each other accordingly.” [46]

“Within the bonds of marriage, husband and wife experience a union with one another in love… And within the bonds of marriage there is both a fulness of equality between husband and wife and a clarity of order, with the husband as the icon of Christ and the wife as the icon of the Church.” [47]

“Christ redeemed marriage and elevated it to the dignity it once enjoyed at the beginning of creation: a lifelong covenant between one man and one woman, oriented toward the good of the spouses and the begetting and raising of children. Paul called marriage a “great mystery” because it is a sign of the union between Christ and his Church, endowed with sacramental grace. (The words ‘sacrament’ and ‘mystery’ are both translated from the Greek mysterion).” [48]

“If we say with Paul that the husband is the “head” in a marriage, then we may say the wife is the ‘heart.’ Is one more important? No, both heart and head are necessary for life. We are inclined today to view our marriages selfishly: what can I get out of it? Instead , we should consider what we can offer to our spouse and see behind each action a picture of the Gospel itself. • Father, may our marriages always be living pictures of Christ’s love and forgiveness. Amen.” [49]

In chapter 6, Paul turns his attention to parents and children, and bondservants and masters. “The parent-child relationship must be based upon mutual respect and governed by the Fourth Commandment. Children owe their parents obedience, and parents owe their children the respect in correspondence to their dignity as sons and daughters of God. Parents should avoid abusive and unreasonable disciplinary measures that can rob children of their dignity. Parents, in addition to providing for the physical needs and education of their children, must invest time and diligence in forming their children in Christian piety and virtue.” [50]

In verse 4, Paul urged, Fathers, do not provoke your children to anger, but bring them up in the discipline and instruction of the Lord. “The Church affirms that parents are the primary educators of their children, particularly when it comes to catechesis and formation in the Faith, morals, and the spiritual life.” [51]

“Slavery [vv. 5-9] was common and accepted in Paul’s day.” [52] Paul cautioned “slaves to perform their work well and ‘with a good will.’ Masters are reminded that they themselves, along with their servants, are subject ultimately to the divine Master, who does not recognize any difference between master and slave. Paul’s call for the dignity of the servant gradually led to the movement to abolish slavery in many places.” [53] (To read more about slavery and the Bible, see the midday reading linked HERE.)

“Paul’s description of the Christian life is not exhaustive, but gives common examples of vocations, or callings, in life. Today, God calls us to serve Him and other people selflessly, lovingly, and conscious of our relationship to Christ. We should examine our lives and our callings. The Lord will forgive our shortcomings and strengthen us to be Christlike. • Lord, no matter how I serve in my family or society, I am Your child and servant through Your Holy Child, Jesus. Grant that I fulfill my calling before You. Amen.” [54]

Compline Prayer

O God, your unfailing providence sustains the world we live in and the life we live: Watch over those, both night and day, who work while others sleep, and grant that we may never forget that our common life depends upon each other’s toil; through Jesus Christ our Lord.  Amen. [55]


Devotionals compiled/written by S. P. Rogers

Citations:

[1] Episcopal Church. (1979). Collects. In The Book of common prayer: And administration of the sacraments, and other rites and ceremonies of the church, according to the use of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States of America: Together with the psalter, or, Psalms of David (pp. 232-233). New York, NY: Church Publishing Incorporated.

[2] Tickle, P. (2000). August. In The divine hours: Prayers for Summertime (Kindle ed., vol. 2, p. 435). New York, NY: Image Books.

[3] Stratman, P. (2001). Loricas. In Prayers from the Ancient Celtic Church (Kindle ed., p. 1). Rossway.

[4] St. Patrick’s “Breastplate” Prayer (The Prayer Foundation). (n.d.). https://www.prayerfoundation.org/st_patricks_breastplate_prayer.htm

[5] Episcopal Church. (1979). Collects. In The Book of common prayer: And administration of the sacraments, and other rites and ceremonies of the church, according to the use of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States of America: Together with the psalter, or, Psalms of David (pp. 251). New York, NY: Church Publishing Incorporated.

[6] Academic Community of St. Athanasius Academy of Orthodox Theology (2008). Nehemiah. In The Orthodox study Bible (p. 580). Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson.

[7] Ibid. 6

[8] Ibid. 6

[9] Tyndale House Publishers. (2012). Profile of Nehemiah [CHART]. In Chronological life application study Bible (p. 1207). Carol Stream, IL: Tyndale House Pub.

[10] Tyndale House Publishers. (2012). Nehemiah. In Chronological life application study Bible (Kindle ed., p. 3409). Carol Stream, IL: Tyndale House Pub.

[11] Tyndale House Publishers. (2012). Law Scroll [IMAGE]. In Chronological life application study Bible (p. 1214). Carol Stream, IL: Tyndale House Pub.

[12] Tyndale House Publishers. (2012). Profile of Ezra [CHART]. In Chronological life application study Bible (p. 1196). Carol Stream, IL: Tyndale House Pub.

[13] Cole, J. (Ed.). (2015). Nehemiah. In Didache Bible: With commentaries based on the Catechism of the Catholic Church (Kindle ed., p. 1118). Downers Grove, IL: Midwest Theological Forum,, Ignatius Press.

[14] Academic Community of St. Athanasius Academy of Orthodox Theology (2008). Nehemiah. In The Orthodox study Bible (p. 596). Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson.

[15] Tyndale House Publishers. (2012). Nehemiah. In Chronological life application study Bible (Kindle ed., p. 6269). Carol Stream, IL: Tyndale House Pub.

[16] Ibid. 14

[17] Ibid. 14

[18] Academic Community of St. Athanasius Academy of Orthodox Theology (2008). Nehemiah. In The Orthodox study Bible (p. 596). Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson.

[19] Tyndale House Publishers. (2012). Nehemiah. In Chronological life application study Bible (Kindle ed., p. 6269). Carol Stream, IL: Tyndale House Pub.

[20] Ibid. 19

[21] Ibid. 19

[22] Tyndale House Publishers. (2012). Nehemiah Goes to Jerusalem [MAP]. In Chronological life application study Bible (Kindle ed., p. 7788). Carol Stream, IL: Tyndale House Pub.

[23] Tyndale House Publishers. (2012). The Restoration of the City Walls [MAP]. In Chronological life application study Bible (Kindle ed., p. 7790). Carol Stream, IL: Tyndale House Pub.

[24] Tyndale House Publishers. (2012). Jerusalem in the Time of Nehemiah [MAP]l. In Chronological life application study Bible (p. 1219). Carol Stream, IL: Tyndale House Pub.

[25] Prayers and Thanksgivings. Daily Prayer: a resource of Forward Movement. (2021). https://prayer.forwardmovement.org/prayers_and_thanksgivings.php

[26] Senior, D., Collins, J. J., & Getty-Sullivan, M. A. (2016). Ephesians. In The Catholic study Bible: The New American Bible, revised edition, translated from the original languages with critical use of all the ancient sources (Third ed., p. 1009). Oxford: Oxford University Press.

[27] Ibid. 26, P. 1011

[28] Cole, J. (Ed.). (2015). Ephesians. In Didache Bible: With commentaries based on the Catechism of the Catholic Church (Kindle ed., p. 3571). Downers Grove, IL: Midwest Theological Forum,, Ignatius Press.

[29] Ibid. 28

[30] Senior, D., Collins, J. J., & Getty-Sullivan, M. A. (2016). Ephesians. In The Catholic study Bible: The New American Bible, revised edition, translated from the original languages with critical use of all the ancient sources (Third ed., p. 1012). Oxford: Oxford University Press.

[31] Ibid. 30

[32] Cole, J. (Ed.). (2015). Ephesians. In Didache Bible: With commentaries based on the Catechism of the Catholic Church (Kindle ed., p. 3571). Downers Grove, IL: Midwest Theological Forum,, Ignatius Press.

[33] Academic Community of St. Athanasius Academy of Orthodox Theology (2008). Ephesians. In The Orthodox study Bible (p. 1637). Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson.

[34] Cole, J. (Ed.). (2015). Ephesians. In Didache Bible: With commentaries based on the Catechism of the Catholic Church (Kindle ed., p. 3571). Downers Grove, IL: Midwest Theological Forum,, Ignatius Press.

[35] A., E. E. (2016). Ephesians. In The Lutheran study Bible: English standard version (Kindle ed., pp. 8647). Saint Louis: Concordia Publishing House.

[36] Academic Community of St. Athanasius Academy of Orthodox Theology (2008). Ephesians. In The Orthodox study Bible (p. 1637). Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson.

[37] Ibid. 36

[38] A., E. E. (2016). Ephesians. In The Lutheran study Bible: English standard version (Kindle ed., pp. 8647). Saint Louis: Concordia Publishing House.

[39] Cole, J. (Ed.). (2015). Ephesians. In Didache Bible: With commentaries based on the Catechism of the Catholic Church (Kindle ed., p. 3571). Downers Grove, IL: Midwest Theological Forum,, Ignatius Press.

[40] Ibid. 39

[41] A., E. E. (2016). Ephesians. In The Lutheran study Bible: English standard version (Kindle ed., pp. 8648). Saint Louis: Concordia Publishing House.

[42] Academic Community of St. Athanasius Academy of Orthodox Theology (2008). Marriage. In The Orthodox study Bible (p. 1638). Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson.

[43] Piper, J., Grudem, W. A., & Ortlund, R. (2021). Male-Female Equality and Male Headship. In Recovering biblical manhood & womanhood: A response to evangelical feminism (Kindle, p. 151). essay, Crossway. 

[44] A., E. E. (2016). Ephesians. In The Lutheran study Bible: English standard version (Kindle ed., pp. 8647). Saint Louis: Concordia Publishing House.

[45] Academic Community of St. Athanasius Academy of Orthodox Theology (2008). Marriage. In The Orthodox study Bible (p. 1638). Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson.

[46] Ibid. 45

[47] Ibid. 45

[48] Cole, J. (Ed.). (2015). Ephesians. In Didache Bible: With commentaries based on the Catechism of the Catholic Church (Kindle ed., p. 3572). Downers Grove, IL: Midwest Theological Forum,, Ignatius Press.

[49] A., E. E. (2016). Ephesians. In The Lutheran study Bible: English standard version (Kindle ed., pp. 8648). Saint Louis: Concordia Publishing House.

[50] Cole, J. (Ed.). (2015). Ephesians. In Didache Bible: With commentaries based on the Catechism of the Catholic Church (Kindle ed., p. 3572). Downers Grove, IL: Midwest Theological Forum,, Ignatius Press.

[51] Ibid. 50

[52] Ibid. 50

[53] Ibid. 50

[54] A., E. E. (2016). Ephesians. In The Lutheran study Bible: English standard version (Kindle ed., pp. 8649). Saint Louis: Concordia Publishing House.

[55] Compline, Anglican Church in North America 2019 Book of Common Prayer

http://bcp2019.anglicanchurch.net/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/09-Compline-11.21.2019.docx

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

Create your website with WordPress.com
Get started
%d bloggers like this: