July 21 Devotional (2021)

“What man of you, having a hundred sheep, if he has lost one of them, does not leave the ninety-nine in the open country, and go after the one that is lost, until he finds it?”

July 21, 2021
Ordinary Time

Today’s Readings:    2 Samuel 5:1-12 / Luke 15:1-10 / ” Follow Me

Invocation

O Lord open thou my lips 

And my mouth shall declare thy praise.

For the sea is his, and he made it: and his hands formed the dry land.

Hymn

“Now Thank We All Our God”

By Martin Rinkart (1636)

Lyrics [1]:

1 Now thank we all our God

with heart and hands and voices,

who wondrous things has done,

in whom his world rejoices;

who from our mothers’ arms

has blessed us on our way

with countless gifts of love,

and still is ours today.

2 O may this bounteous God

through all our life be near us,

with ever joyful hearts

and blessed peace to cheer us,

to keep us in his grace,

and guide us when perplexed,

and free us from all ills

of this world in the next.

3 All praise and thanks to God

the Father now be given,

the Son and Spirit blest,

who reign in highest heaven

the one eternal God,

whom heaven and earth adore;

for thus it was, is now,

and shall be evermore.


Morning Prayer

Almighty and everlasting God, by whose Spirit the whole body of your faithful people is governed and sanctified: Receive my supplications and prayers this day, which I offer before you for all members of your holy Church, that in our vocations and ministries we may all truly and devoutly serve you; through our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ. Amen.

  • Adapted from the Book of Common Prayer [2]

Short Verse

O Savior of the world, who by thy cross and precious blood hast redeemed us: 

Save us and help us, we humbly beseech thee, O Lord.

The Shepherd”
By Gardner David
(source)

Morning Reading: 2 Samuel 5:1-12

David is to shepherd Israel

1 Then all the tribes of Israel came to David at Hebron and said, “Behold, we are your bone and flesh. 2 In times past, when Saul was king over us, it was you who led out and brought in Israel. And the LORD said to you, ‘You shall be shepherd of my people Israel, and you shall be prince over Israel.’” 3 So all the elders of Israel came to the king at Hebron, and King David made a covenant with them at Hebron before the LORD, and they anointed David king over Israel. 4 David was thirty years old when he began to reign, and he reigned forty years. 5 At Hebron he reigned over Judah seven years and six months, and at Jerusalem he reigned over all Israel and Judah thirty-three years.

6 And the king and his men went to Jerusalem against the Jebusites, the inhabitants of the land, who said to David, “You will not come in here, but the blind and the lame will ward you off”—thinking, “David cannot come in here.” 7 Nevertheless, David took the stronghold of Zion, that is, the city of David. 8 And David said on that day, “Whoever would strike the Jebusites, let him get up the water shaft to attack ‘the lame and the blind,’ who are hated by David’s soul.” Therefore it is said, “The blind and the lame shall not come into the house.” 9 And David lived in the stronghold and called it the city of David. And David built the city all around from the Millo inward. 10 And David became greater and greater, for the LORD, the God of hosts, was with him.

11 And Hiram king of Tyre sent messengers to David, and cedar trees, also carpenters and masons who built David a house. 12 And David knew that the LORD had established him king over Israel, and that he had exalted his kingdom for the sake of his people Israel.

Morning Lesson

The third time David anointed king

“This was the third time David was anointed king [vv. 3-5]. First he was privately anointed by Samuel (1 Sam 16:13). Then he was made king over the tribe of Judah (2 Sam 2:4). Finally he was crowned king over all Israel. David’s life as an outlaw had looked bleak, but God’s promise to make him king over all Israel was now being fulfilled. Although the kingdom would be divided again in less than 75 years, David’s dynasty would reign over Judah, the south.” [3]

“David did not become king over all Israel until he was 37 years old, although he had been promised the kingdom many years earlier (1 Sam 16:13). During those years, David had to wait patiently for the fulfillment of God’s promise. If you feel pressured to achieve instant results and success, remember David’s patience. Just as his time of waiting prepared him for his important task, a waiting period may help prepare you by strengthening your character.” [4]

“The fortress of Zion (which became the city of Jerusalem) was located on a high ridge near the center of the united Israelite kingdom. David chose Jerusalem as his capital for both political and military reasons. It was considered neutral territory because it stood on the border of the territory of the tribes of Benjamin and Judah, and it was still occupied by the Jebusites, a Canaanite tribe that had never been expelled from the land (Judg 1:21). Jerusalem also sat on a high ridge, making it difficult to attack.” [5]

“The Jebusites had a clear military advantage, and they boasted of their security behind the impregnable walls of Zion. But they soon discovered that their walls would not protect them. David caught them by surprise by entering the city through the water tunnel.” [6]

“Only in God are we truly safe and secure. Anything else is false security. Whether you are surrounded by mighty walls of stone, a comfortable home, or a secure job, no one can predict what tomorrow may bring. Our relationship with God is the only security that cannot be taken away.” [7]

“Although the pagan kingdoms based their greatness on conquest, power, armies, and wealth, David knew that his greatness came only from God. To be great means keeping a close relationship with God personally and nationally. To do this, David had to keep his ambition under control. Although he was famous, successful, and well liked, he gave God first place in his life and served the people according to God’s purposes. Do you seek greatness from God or from people? In the drive for success, remember to keep your ambition under God’s control.” [8]


Midday Prayer

Our Father, who art in heaven,

     hallowed be thy Name,

     thy kingdom come,

     thy will be done,

         on earth as it is in heaven.

Give us this day our daily bread.

And forgive us our trespasses,

     as we forgive those

         who trespass against us.

And lead us not into temptation,

     but deliver us from evil.

For thine is the kingdom,

     and the power, and the glory,

     for ever and ever. Amen.

Short Verse

Come now and see the works of God,* how wonderful he is in his doing toward all people. 

Psalm 66:4
In this parable, a woman sweeps her dark house looking for a lost coin (engraving by John Everett Millais).
(source)

Midday Reading: Luke 15:1-10

Parables of the lost

1 Now the tax collectors and sinners were all drawing near to hear him. 2 And the Pharisees and the scribes grumbled, saying, “This man receives sinners and eats with them.”

3 So he told them this parable: 4 “What man of you, having a hundred sheep, if he has lost one of them, does not leave the ninety-nine in the open country, and go after the one that is lost, until he finds it? 5 And when he has found it, he lays it on his shoulders, rejoicing. 6 And when he comes home, he calls together his friends and his neighbors, saying to them, ‘Rejoice with me, for I have found my sheep that was lost.’ 7 Just so, I tell you, there will be more joy in heaven over one sinner who repents than over ninety-nine righteous persons who need no repentance.


8 “Or what woman, having ten silver coins, if she loses one coin, does not light a lamp and sweep the house and seek diligently until she finds it? 9 And when she has found it, she calls together her friends and neighbors, saying, ‘Rejoice with me, for I have found the coin that I had lost.’ 10 Just so, I tell you, there is joy before the angels of God over one sinner who repents.”

Depiction of the Good Shepherd by Jean-Baptiste de Champaigne showing the influence of this parable.
(source)

Midday Lesson

The lost sheep and the lost coin

Today’s reading from Luke contains two parables: the parable of the lost sheep and the parable of the lost coin.

“Sharing a meal was a sign of friendship and reconciliation; thus, to the Pharisees, Christ appeared to be accepting of sinners. He used this opportunity to show that his mission is to call sinners to repentance, for which there is more reason to rejoice than there is over those who have never strayed from the faith.” [9]

In the first parable, “Jesus use[d] the devotion of a shepherd to illustrate God’s willingness to find the wayward sinner. God does not abandon us to our foolishness but seeks us out, calling us to repentance and to faith in the Gospel. • Bring us home, dear Lord, and let there be joy in heaven. Grant us daily repentance. Amen.” [10]

“The lost sheep represents the sinner, while God, [especially] the Son, is the shepherd (cf Ps 23; Is 40:11). The found sheep is every Christian, rescued and delivered by God. The neighbors are the saints and angels who rejoice together.” [11]

“Just as a shepherd gathers his scattered flock and seeks out those sheep who have been lost, Christ, the Good Shepherd, desires to call all his people together as one and to reconcile the wayward sinner back into the fold. As successors to the Apostles, the bishops—as well as the deacons and priests who assist them—are entrusted with the preeminent task of being good shepherds. However, every Christian is called to be a good shepherd to family members and friends, leading them always to Christ.” [12]

“In the second parable, the repentant sinner is like a coin. Unlike the wandering sheep, the coin is inanimate, emphasizing its complete helplessness. The neighbors represent the angels, who are invited to share the joy of God, for He has found something precious.” [13]

“The unrepentant sinner is like a coin lost in the darkness. Once lost, we have no more ability to find the Lord than the coin has to find its owner. Yet, the good news of Christ gives “light to those who sit in darkness and in the shadow of death” (1:79). • Thank You, merciful Lord, for seeking us when we had no power to seek You. Amen.” [14]


Eventide Prayer

That this evening may be holy, good, and peaceful,

We entreat you, O Lord.

That your holy angels may lead us in paths of peace and goodwill,

We entreat you, O Lord.

That we may be pardoned and forgiven for our sins and offenses,

We entreat you, O Lord.

That there may be peace to your Church and to the whole world,

We entreat you, O Lord.

That we may depart this life in your faith and fear, and not be condemned before the great judgment seat of Christ,

We entreat you, O Lord.

That we may be bound together by your Holy Spirit in the communion of all your saints, entrusting one another and all our life to Christ,

We entreat you, O Lord. Amen. [15]

Short Verse

Be sober, be watchful. Your adversary the devil prowls around like a roaring lion, seeking someone to devour. Resist him, firm in your faith.    

1 Peter 5:8-9a
The Curr Family.  This image is from a 1930s reproduction, exact date to be determined.
Reproduced with acknowledgement to Dr Sandy Brewer, Galloway, SW Scotland
(source)

Eventide Reading

Follow Me

Follow Me … press on … press in, pursue me… 

Sit with Me … know who you are … discover who I am … then let My ‘I AM’ overtake you until who I am becomes what you are like. 

Now go … walk with Me and learn what this means… [16]

Compline Prayer

Almighty God, Father, Son, and Holy Spirit, eternal, ever-blessed, gracious God, to me the least of saints, to me allow that I may keep a door in Paradise, even the smallest door, the farthest, darkest, coldest door, the door that is least used, the stiffest door, if only it be in your house, O God, that I can see your glory even afar, and hear your voice, and know that I am with you—you, O God. 

  • Attributed to St. Columba, d. 597, adapted by William Muir, d. 1905 A Little Book of Life and Death, 1905, p. 272 [17]

  • Devotionals compiled/written by S.P. Rogers

    Citations:

    [1] Author: Martin RinkartRinkart, M. (n.d.). Now thank we all our god. Retrieved April 28, 2021, from https://hymnary.org/text/now_thank_we_all_our_god

    [2] Episcopal Church. (1979). Daily Office. In The Book of common prayer: And administration of the sacraments, and other rites and ceremonies of the church, according to the use of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States of America: Together with the psalter, or, Psalms of David (pp. 100). New York, NY: Church Publishing Incorporated.

    [3] Tyndale House Publishers. (2012). 2 Samuel. In Chronological life application study Bible (Kindle ed., p. 5600). Carol Stream, IL: Tyndale House Pub.

    [4] Ibid. 3

    [5] Ibid. 3, P. 5602

    [6] Ibid. 3, P. 5602

    [7] Ibid. 3, P. 5608

    [8] Ibid. 3, P. 5602

    [9] Cole, J. (Ed.). (2015). Luke. In Didache Bible: With commentaries based on the Catechism of the Catholic Church (Kindle ed., p. 3135). Downers Grove, IL: Midwest Theological Forum,, Ignatius Press.

    [10] A., E. E. (2016). Luke. In The Lutheran study Bible: English standard version (Kindle ed., pp. 7482). Saint Louis: Concordia Publishing House.

    [11] Ibid. 10, P. 7481

    [12] Cole, J. (Ed.). (2015). Luke. In Didache Bible: With commentaries based on the Catechism of the Catholic Church (Kindle ed., p. 3135). Downers Grove, IL: Midwest Theological Forum,, Ignatius Press.

    [13] A., E. E. (2016). Luke. In The Lutheran study Bible: English standard version (Kindle ed., pp. 7482). Saint Louis: Concordia Publishing House.

    [14] Ibid. 13, P. 7483

    [15] Episcopal Church. (1979). Daily Office. In The Book of common prayer: And administration of the sacraments, and other rites and ceremonies of the church, according to the use of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States of America: Together with the psalter, or, Psalms of David (pp. 122). New York, NY: Church Publishing Incorporated.

    [16] The Northumbria Community. (2015). Morning Prayer. In Celtic Daily Prayer (Kindle ed., p. 78956). London: HarperCollins.

    [17] Papavassiliou, V. (2014). Dedication. In The ancient faith prayer book (Kindle ed., p. 59). Chesterton, IN: Ancient Faith Publishing.

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