July 9 Devotional

The earth is the LORD’s and the fullness thereof, the world and those who dwell therein, for he has founded it upon the seas and established it upon the rivers.

July 9, 2021
Ordinary Time

Today’s Readings:    Psalm 24 / Amos 3:1-15 / Colossians 4:1-18

Invocation

O Lord open thou my lips 

And my mouth shall declare thy praise.

For the Lord is a great God, and a great King above all gods. For in his hand are all the ends of the earth: and the heights of the mountains are his.

Hymn

“Tis so sweet to trust in Jesus”
Lyrics [1]:
1’Tis so sweet to trust in Jesus,Just to take Him at His word;Just to rest upon His promise;Just to know, Thus saith the Lord.
 Jesus, Jesus, how I trust Him,How I’ve proved Him o’er and o’er,Jesus, Jesus, Precious Jesus!  O for grace to trust Him more.
2O how sweet to trust in Jesus,Just to trust His cleansing blood;Just in simple faith to plunge me,’Neath the healing, cleansing flood.
3Yes, ’tis sweet to trust in Jesus,Just from sin and self to cease;Just from Jesus simply takingLife, and rest, and joy, and peace.
4I’m so glad I learned to trust Thee,Precious Jesus, Savior, Friend;And I know that Thou art with me,Wilt be with me to the end.

Morning Prayer

Most merciful God,

we confess that we have sinned against you

in thought, word, and deed,

by what we have done,

and by what we have left undone.

We have not loved you with our whole heart;

we have not loved our neighbors as ourselves.

We are truly sorry and we humbly repent.

For the sake of your Son Jesus Christ,

have mercy on us and forgive us;

that we may delight in your will,

and walk in your ways,

to the glory of your Name. Amen. [2]

Short Verse

The Lord is in his holy temple; let all the earth keep silence before him.    

Habakkuk 2:20
“Fishermen on the coast of the sea”
by Ivan Aivazovsky, 1852
(source)

Morning Reading: Psalm 24

The King of glory shall come in

1 The earth is the LORD’s and the fullness thereof,

the world and those who dwell therein,

2 for he has founded it upon the seas

and established it upon the rivers.

3 Who shall ascend the hill of the LORD?

And who shall stand in his holy place?

4 He who has clean hands and a pure heart,

who does not lift up his soul to what is false

and does not swear deceitfully.

5 He will receive blessing from the LORD

and righteousness from the God of his salvation.

6 Such is the generation of those who seek him,

who seek the face of the God of Jacob.b Selah

7 Lift up your heads, O gates!

And be lifted up, O ancient doors,

that the King of glory may come in.

8 Who is this King of glory?

The LORD, strong and mighty,

the LORD, mighty in battle!

9 Lift up your heads, O gates!

And lift them up, O ancient doors,

that the King of glory may come in.

10 Who is this King of glory?

The LORD of hosts,

he is the King of glory! Selah

Listen to Psalm 24

Morning Lesson

The King of Glory

In Psalm 24 we find a “prophecy of the Resurrection of the Lord Jesus Christ (the first day of the week, see title)… His Resurrection proves (1) He is the Creator of the world, which He owns (vv. 1, 2); (2) He is worthy to ascend on high as the Forerunner of the Church (vv. 3-6; see also Heb 6:19, 20; 7:26; 9:24); (3) He is the King of glory, who destroyed death and Hades (vv. 7-10; see also Rev 1:18; 4:8-11).” [3]

“Heavenly Lord, everything in me and everything in the earth and skies above belongs to You because You are our Creator. I can claim nothing for myself. How I marvel at the miracle of life, from my DNA to the meshing of matter and energy and all the laws You put into place to make them work in an orderly fashion. That is the God I serve, my standard bearer. Of course You are strong and mighty. You could crush all creation with the wave of a single finger, but instead You deal with me in mercy and grace. Come into my life, oh King of Glory. Rule in me. Amen.” [4]


OPTIONAL FURTHER READING:
Commentary from the Early Church

Verse 8

God spared not his own Son for you, letting him become a curse for us; for [as Gl 3:13 states,] “cursed is he who hangs on a tree”; that he might redeem us from our sins. The sun was darkened on the day of our redemption; hell lost its right to us, and we were enrolled for heaven. The eternal gates were lifted up that the King of glory, the Lord of might, might enter in, and humankind, born of the earth, destined for hell, was purchased for heaven. 

  • Tertullian, On Flight in Time of Persecution 12.2. [5]
  • Verse 9

    The way lies open now from earth to heaven. Let the prophet’s trumpet sound again: get rid of your gates, yes, even you heavenly princes, you who have erected gates in the minds of people who worship the host of heaven. “But you, everlasting gates, lift yourselves up” [vv. 7,9, Vg] gates of everlasting righteousness, love and purity, through which a soul loves the one true God and refuses to prostitute itself to many so-called gods. “And the King of glory will enter.”. . . The King of glory will make his way in, to intercede for us at the Father’s right hand. 

  • Augustine, Expositions of the Psalms 24.9. [6]
  • Verse 10

    He is the king of glory who makes glorious those who glorify him . . . He allots power and strength and other gifts to each one as he desires. 

  • Cassiodorus, Explanation of the Psalms 24.9. [7]

  • Midday Prayer

    Blessed Savior, at this hour you hung upon the cross, stretching out your loving arms: Grant that all the peoples of the earth may look to you and be saved; for your tender mercies’ sake. Amen. [8]

    Affirmation

    We believe and trust in God the Father Almighty. 

    We believe and trust in Jesus Christ His Son. 

    We believe and trust in the Holy Spirit. 

    We believe and trust in the Three in One.

    “Amos”
    circa 1896–1902, 
    by James Jacques Joseph Tissot (French, 1836-1902)
    (source)

    Midday Reading: Amos 3:1-15

    Who can but prophesy?

    1 Hear this word that the LORD has spoken against you, O people of Israel, against the whole family that I brought up out of the land of Egypt:

    2 “You only have I known

    of all the families of the earth;

    therefore I will punish you

    for all your iniquities.

    3 “Do two walk together,

    unless they have agreed to meet?

    4 Does a lion roar in the forest,

    when he has no prey?

    Does a young lion cry out from his den,

    if he has taken nothing?

    5 Does a bird fall in a snare on the earth,

    when there is no trap for it?

    Does a snare spring up from the ground,

    when it has taken nothing?

    6 Is a trumpet blown in a city,

    and the people are not afraid?

    Does disaster come to a city,

    unless the LORD has done it?

    7 “For the Lord GOD does nothing

    without revealing his secret

    to his servants the prophets.

    8 The lion has roared;

    who will not fear?

    The Lord GOD has spoken;

    who can but prophesy?”

    9 Proclaim to the strongholds in Ashdod

    and to the strongholds in the land of Egypt,

    and say, “Assemble yourselves on the mountains of Samaria,

    and see the great tumults within her,

    and the oppressed in her midst.”

    10 “They do not know how to do right,” declares the LORD,

    “those who store up violence and robbery in their strongholds.”

    11 Therefore thus says the Lord GOD:

    “An adversary shall surround the land

    and bring down your defenses from you,

    and your strongholds shall be plundered.”

    12 Thus says the LORD: “As the shepherd rescues from the mouth of the lion two legs, or a piece of an ear, so shall the people of Israel who dwell in Samaria be rescued, with the corner of a couch and part of a bed.

    13 “Hear, and testify against the house of Jacob,”

    declares the Lord GOD, the God of hosts,

    14 “that on the day I punish Israel for his transgressions,

    I will punish the altars of Bethel,

    and the horns of the altar shall be cut off

    and fall to the ground.

    15 I will strike the winter house along with the summer house,

    and the houses of ivory shall perish,

    and the great houses shall come to an end,”

    declares the LORD.

    Midday Lesson

    Israel’s Guilt and Punishment

    “Amos was born in the small rural village of Tekoa, twelve miles south of Jerusalem. He was a goatherd and a tender of sycamore, a contemporary of Hosea. Amos may have known Jonah and Elisha when he was young, and Isaiah and Micah when he was older. He prophesied to the Southern Kingdom (Judah) from 795-754 BC. His prophecies were the first to be written down, perhaps because he was the first prophet to proclaim the end of God’s covenant with Israel for their stubborn unrepentance. The prophecies occurred approximately 30 years before the Assyrians captured Samaria in 721 BC, during the time when the two kingdoms [of Israel] were divided. Josephus [37 – c. 100 AD] wrote that a great earthquake took place (1:1) when Uziah was struck with leprosy. The Israelites had amassed great wealth because of their control over the trade routes, which had created an aristocratic class. Amos was sent to Bethel to warn the king and the people of the Northern Kingdom to repent. The priests, who were tired of his prophecies, clubbed Amos to death.” [9]

    In today’s reading, the “Lord accused the Israelites more severely ‘and showed that they deserved greater punishment because they sinned after receiving the honors that He had bestowed on them’” (St. John Chrysostom) [10]. “God chose Israel to be the people through whom all other nations of the world could know Him. He made this promise to Abraham, father of the Israelites (Gen 12:1-3)… Pride in their privileged position ruined Israel’s sensitivity to the will of God and to the plight of others.” [11] “God’s relationship with Israel was not only intimate, it was exclusive. God had been faithful to Israel, yet Israel had not been faithful to God. For this reason, the nation would be judged.” [12]

    “The Lord accused the Israelites more severely [v. 1] ‘and showed that they deserved greater punishment, because they sinned after receiving the honors that he had bestowed on them [John Chrysostom].” [13]

    Verses 3-6 contain a series of rhetorical questions. These questions accomplish two things: (1) the “questions illustrate the seriousness, certainty, and righteousness of God’s impending action against Israel… [with] each question framed so as to require a resounding ‘no’ as its answer” [14]; and (2) the questions “show how two events can be linked together. Once one event takes place, the second will surely follow. [Thus] Amos was showing that God’s revelation to him was the sure sign that judgement would  follow.” [15]

    These six rhetorical questions, “each expecting a negative response, lead to a climactic seventh one…” [16] Verse 6b says: “Does disaster come to a city, unless the LORD has done it?” On whether God was the author of evil, Saint John Chrysostom explained: “Now evil is a many-faceted thing… There is evil, which is really evil: fornication, adultery, covetousness, and the countless dreadful things, which are worthy of the utmost reproach and punishment. [Then] there is evil, which rather is not evil but is caused so: famine, pestilence… disease, and other of a similar nature… These were evils intended to become the sources of good to us, chastening our pride, goading out sloth and leading us on to zeal,, making us more attentive.” [17] It is this second kind of “evil” – that which is not truly evil, but is called so – which God “commands” (permits). 

    “Sin does not originate with the Holy One, who made all things good. Yet the prophet plainly speaks of a disaster (lit., ‘evil’) coming from the Lord… The Almighty does indeed permit disasters as a natural consequence of sin. Jeremiah later characterized disaster coming upon people as ‘the fruit’ of their wicked devices and godless plans (Jer 6:19).” [18] Therefore, God was here declaring that it was He who would be “sending” (allowing) disaster to come upon Israel. 

    “Even in anger, God is merciful. He always warned His people through prophets before punishing them so they could not rationalize or complain when judgement came. Warnings about sin and judgement apply to people today just as they did to Israel. Because we have been warned about our sin, we have no excuse when punishment comes. Do not take lightly the warnings in God’s Word about judgement. His warnings are a way of showing mercy to you.” [19]

    “As a lion will not roar in a forest with no prey [v. 4], so the passions will not attack the believer who brings ‘every thought into captivity to the obedience of Christ’ (2Co 10:5).” [20]

    Verse 9 says, “Proclaim to the strongholds in Ashdod and to the strongholds in the land of Egypt, and say, “Assemble yourselves on the mountains of Samaria, and see the great tumults within her, and the oppressed in her midst.” “Ashod was one of five principal cities of the Philistines, [and] was [located] on the Mediterranean coast southwest of Israel.” [21]

    Egypt was a “[p]erenially powerful nation from which the Lord delivered Israel during the exodus… A measure of God’s disgust with Samaria is that He threatened to assemble Ashod and Egypt [pagan cities] on the surrounding peaks to act as witnesses of the rampant injustices and oppression being perpetrated therein… Innocent and the poor were regularly denied justice, as Amos emphasizes (2:6-7; 5:11-12; 8:4-6).” [22]

    Sadly, the “people of Israel no longer knew how to do what was right. The more they sinned, the harder it was to remember what God wanted. The same is true for us. The longer we wait to deal with sin, the greater the hold it has on us. Finally, we forget what it means to do right. Are you on the verge of forgetting?” [23]

    Verse 11 says, “Therefore thus says the Lord GOD: ‘An adversary shall surround the land and bring down your defenses from you, and your strongholds shall be plundered.’” The adversary “mentioned here was Assyria, which conquered Israel and did just as Amos predicted. The people were scattered to foreign lands, and foreigners were placed in the land to keep the peace. Israel’s leaders had robbed their defenseless countrymen, and here they would be rendered defenseless by the Assyrans.” [24]  

    Verse 12 in our reading says, “Thus says the LORD: “As the shepherd rescues from the mouth of the lion two legs, or a piece of an ear, so shall the people of Israel who dwell in Samaria be rescued, with the corner of a couch and part of a bed.” In his prophet, Amos warned that “even if the Israelites tried to repent it would be too late. The destruction would be so complete that nothing of value would be left.” [25] The description in verse 12 of a sheep that had been killed by a lion is most meaningful when situated in its historical context. “In reporting a sheep killed by wild beasts, a shepherd would often produce the victim’s remains as proof of what happened (cf Gn 31:39). So also the remnant of Israel [would] similarly be a small and mangled portion of the whole after its enemies [laid] waste and carr[ied] away the people in exile… The once mighty house of Israel [would be] reduced to a few scraps of furniture.” [26]

    “Amid tribulation, God promised to save a remnant of the people of Israel, who would renew their fidelity to his covenant. Two sets of prophetic voices emerged in ancient Israel, one prophesying the coming of the Messiah (e.g., Isaiah), and the other prophesying a new outpouring of the spirit of God (e.g., Amos, Joel). The remnant of Israel would see the realization of both prophecies.” [27]


    OPTIONAL FURTHER READING:
    Commentary from the Early Church

    Verses 3-6

    As it is impossible for two people to share a journey at the same time, he is saying, unless indicating to each other where and why they are traveling, or for a lion to roar if there is no prey, or for a bird to fall without a hunter, or for all the other things mentioned, so it is impossible for any punishment to be imposed without God willing it. He calls punishment “evil” [Vg; “disaster” in CSB–Ed.] . . . by use of a general custom: we are accustomed to use “troubles” of diseases, chastisements, untimely deaths, famines, wars, and the like, not because they are troublesome by nature but because they are troublesome to human beings and the source of distress and grief. 

  • Theodoret of Cyrus, Commentary on Amos 3.6–8. [28]
  • Verse 12

    If, then, any hope of salvation is still left to you, if any slight remembrance of God, if any desire for future rewards, if any fear of the punishments reserved for the unrepentant come back quickly to sobriety; raise your eyes to the heavens; return to your senses; cease your wickedness; shake off the drunkenness that has drenched you; stand up against him who has overthrown you. Have the strength to rise up from the earth. Remember the good Shepherd, how he will pursue and deliver you. And if there are but “two legs, or the tip of an ear,” leap back from him who has wounded you. Remember the compassion of God, how he heals with olive oil and wine. Do not despair of salvation. Recall the memory of what has been written, how he that falls rises again, and he that is turned away turns again, he that has been smitten is healed, he that is caught by wild beasts escapes, and he that confesses is not rejected. The Lord does not wish the death of the sinner, but that he return and live. Do not be contemptuous as one who has fallen into the depths of sins.

  • Basil the Great, Letter 44, To a Fallen Monk [29]

  • Eventide Prayer

    O Lord God Almighty, as you have taught us to call the evening, the morning, and the noonday one day; and have made the sun to know its going down: Dispel the darkness of our hearts, that by your brightness we may know you to be the true God and eternal light, living and reigning for ever and ever. Amen. [30]

    Short Verse

    Worship the Lord in the beauty of his holiness; let the whole earth tremble before him.    

    Psalm 96:9
    “Mystery Horses”
    Abstract painting by Oswin Gesselli
    (source)

    Eventide Reading: Colossians 4:1-18

    Declaring the mystery of Christ

    1 Masters, treat your bondservants justly and fairly, knowing that you also have a Master in heaven.

    Further Instructions

    2 Continue steadfastly in prayer, being watchful in it with thanksgiving. 3 At the same time, pray also for us, that God may open to us a door for the word, to declare the mystery of Christ, on account of which I am in prison— 4 that I may make it clear, which is how I ought to speak.

    5 Walk in wisdom toward outsiders, making the best use of the time. 6 Let your speech always be gracious, seasoned with salt, so that you may know how you ought to answer each person.

    Final Greetings

    7 Tychicus will tell you all about my activities. He is a beloved brother and faithful minister and fellow servant in the Lord. 8 I have sent him to you for this very purpose, that you may know how we are and that he may encourage your hearts, 9 and with him Onesimus, our faithful and beloved brother, who is one of you. They will tell you of everything that has taken place here.

    10 Aristarchus my fellow prisoner greets you, and Mark the cousin of Barnabas (concerning whom you have received instructions—if he comes to you, welcome him), 11 and Jesus who is called Justus. These are the only men of the circumcision among my fellow workers for the kingdom of God, and they have been a comfort to me. 12 Epaphras, who is one of you, a servant of Christ Jesus, greets you, always struggling on your behalf in his prayers, that you may stand mature and fully assured in all the will of God. 13 For I bear him witness that he has worked hard for you and for those in Laodicea and in Hierapolis. 14 Luke the beloved physician greets you, as does Demas. 15 Give my greetings to the brothers at Laodicea, and to Nympha and the church in her house. 16 And when this letter has been read among you, have it also read in the church of the Laodiceans; and see that you also read the letter from Laodicea. 17 And say to Archippus, “See that you fulfill the ministry that you have received in the Lord.”

    18 I, Paul, write this greeting with my own hand. Remember my chains. Grace be with you.

    Eventide Lesson

    Pray often

    “Respect for the dignity of the human person demands we treat others justly [v. 1]. Such respect fosters justice in all human relationships and contributes to the common good.” [31] “Living a virtuous life in union with Christ requires a serious dedication to prayer, which is at the very heart of the Christian life. Constant prayer, particularly prayers of adoration and thanksgiving, along with remaining always in the presence of God should mark the life of a Christian. The Church fulfills Christ’s command to pray always in the Liturgy of the Hours.” [32] 

    “Paul expected the Church to be at corporate prayer often. Not only are the apostles to speak the mystery of Christ, but every member of the church is to have speech… with grace so as to answer those seeking the true faith.” [33] Regarding prayer (verse 2), Caesarius of Arles wrote, “This seems to indicate that the people of God did not fight with the hand or weapons so much as with the voice and tongue, that is, they poured forth prayer to God, and thus overcame their adversaries. Therefore, you, too, if you want to be victorious, listen to the apostle say, ‘Be assiduous in prayer, being wakeful.’ This is the most glorious fight of the Christian, not to presume upon his own strength but always to implore the assistance of God.” [34]

    Tychicus (vv. 7-9) was “the courier for this letter as well as for those to the Ephesians (Eph 6:21) and to Philemon.” [35]

    “Among the easily recognizable names in this passage,” verses 7-18, “are the Evangelists Mark and Luke; Barnabas, a frequent traveling companion with Paul; and Onesimus, a runaway slave who was the subject of Paul’s letter to Philemon. Paul refers to these men as ‘fellow workers for the kingdom of God’ because of their commitment to the mission of Christ.” [36]

    “The various Epistles and Gospel accounts in circulation at the time were exchanged and read at the assemblies for the Eucharist. Early and widespread use of these writings [v. 16] in the Christian liturgy was among the considerations of the Church in determining the canon of Sacred Scripture.” [37]

    “Paul expected his letters to be read aloud to the churches and at least sometimes to be sent on to neighboring churches (Colosse and Laodicea are less than 15 miles apart). Paul’s letter coming from Laodicea probably is the one we know as Ephesians.” [38]

    Compline Prayer

    Visit this place, O Lord, and drive far from it all snares of the enemy; let your holy angels dwell with us to preserve us in peace; and let your blessing be upon us always; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen. [39]


    Devotionals compiled/written by S.P. Rogers

    Citations:

    [1] Hymn: Tis so sweet to trust in Jesus. (2021). Retrieved April 26, 2021, from https://www.hymnal.net/en/hymn/h/568

    [2] Episcopal Church. (1979). Daily Office. In The Book of common prayer: And administration of the sacraments, and other rites and ceremonies of the church, according to the use of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States of America: Together with the psalter, or, Psalms of David (pp. 79). New York, NY: Church Publishing Incorporated.

    [3] Academic Community of St. Athanasius Academy of Orthodox Theology (2008). Psalms. In The Orthodox study Bible (p. 727). Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson.

    [4] FRANKLIN, D. (2018). Day 29. In PRAY THROUGH THE BIBLE IN A YEAR JOURNAL: A daily devotional and reading plan. Uhrichsville, OH: BARBOUR PUB.

    [5] Tertullian. (2019). Psalms. In Ancient faith study Bible (Kindle ed., p. 1566). Nashville: Holman Bible.

    [6] Augustine. (2019). Psalms. In Ancient faith study Bible (Kindle ed., p. 1566). Nashville: Holman Bible.

    [7] Cassiodorus. (2019). Psalms. In Ancient faith study Bible (Kindle ed., p. 1566). Nashville: Holman Bible.

    [8] Episcopal Church. (1979). Daily Office. In The Book of common prayer: And administration of the sacraments, and other rites and ceremonies of the church, according to the use of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States of America: Together with the psalter, or, Psalms of David (pp. 107). New York, NY: Church Publishing Incorporated.

    [9] Academic Community of St. Athanasius Academy of Orthodox Theology (2008). Amos. In The Orthodox study Bible (p. 1027). Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson.

    [10] Ibid. 9, P. 1034

    [11] Tyndale House Publishers. (2012). Amosl. In Chronological life application study Bible (p. 773). Carol Stream, IL: Tyndale House Pub.

    [12] Radmacher, E. D., Allen, R. B., & House, H. W. (2007). Amos. In NKJV study Bible: New King James Version (Second ed., p. 1394). Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson.

    [13] Academic Community of St. Athanasius Academy of Orthodox Theology (2008). Amos. In The Orthodox study Bible (p. 1043). Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson.

    [14] Radmacher, E. D., Allen, R. B., & House, H. W. (2007). Amos. In NKJV study Bible: New King James Version (Second ed., p. 1394). Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson.

    [15] Tyndale House Publishers. (2012). Amosl. In Chronological life application study Bible (p. 773). Carol Stream, IL: Tyndale House Pub.

    [16] House, C. P. (2009). Amos. In HOLY BIBLE: The lutheran study bible (p. 1461). St. Louis, MO: Concordia Publishing HSE.

    [17] Academic Community of St. Athanasius Academy of Orthodox Theology (2008). Amos. In The Orthodox study Bible (p. 1043). Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson.

    [18] House, C. P. (2009). Amos. In HOLY BIBLE: The lutheran study bible (p. 1461). St. Louis, MO: Concordia Publishing HSE.

    [19] Tyndale House Publishers. (2012). Amosl. In Chronological life application study Bible (p. 773). Carol Stream, IL: Tyndale House Pub.

    [20] Academic Community of St. Athanasius Academy of Orthodox Theology (2008). Amos. In The Orthodox study Bible (p. 1043). Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson.

    [21] Radmacher, E. D., Allen, R. B., & House, H. W. (2007). Amos. In NKJV study Bible: New King James Version (Second ed., p. 1394). Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson.

    [22] House, C. P. (2009). Amos. In HOLY BIBLE: The lutheran study bible (p. 1462). St. Louis, MO: Concordia Publishing HSE.

    [23] Tyndale House Publishers. (2012). Amosl. In Chronological life application study Bible (p. 773). Carol Stream, IL: Tyndale House Pub.

    [24] Ibid. 23

    [25] Ibid. 23

    [26] House, C. P. (2009). Amos. In HOLY BIBLE: The lutheran study bible (p. 1461). St. Louis, MO: Concordia Publishing HSE.

    [27] Cole, J. (Ed.). (2015). Amos. In Didache Bible: With commentaries based on the Catechism of the Catholic Church (Kindle ed., p. 2585). Downers Grove, IL: Midwest Theological Forum,, Ignatius Press.

    [28] Theodoret of Cyrus. (2019). Amos. In Ancient faith study Bible (Kindle ed., p. 2533). Nashville: Holman Bible.

    [29] Basil the Great. (2019). Amos. In Ancient faith study Bible (Kindle ed., p. 2533-2534). Nashville: Holman Bible.

    [30] Episcopal Church. (1979). Daily Office. In The Book of common prayer: And administration of the sacraments, and other rites and ceremonies of the church, according to the use of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States of America: Together with the psalter, or, Psalms of David (pp. 110). New York, NY: Church Publishing Incorporated.

    [31] Cole, J. (Ed.). (2015). Colossians. In Didache Bible: With commentaries based on the Catechism of the Catholic Church (Kindle ed., p. 3607). Downers Grove, IL: Midwest Theological Forum,, Ignatius Press.

    [32] Ibid. 31

    [33] Academic Community of St. Athanasius Academy of Orthodox Theology (2008). Colossians. In The Orthodox study Bible (p. 1652). Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson.

    [34] Caesarius of Arles. (2019). Colossians. In Ancient faith study Bible (Kindle ed., p. 3381). Nashville: Holman Bible.

    [35] Academic Community of St. Athanasius Academy of Orthodox Theology (2008). Colossians. In The Orthodox study Bible (p. 1652). Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson.

    [36] Cole, J. (Ed.). (2015). Colossians. In Didache Bible: With commentaries based on the Catechism of the Catholic Church (Kindle ed., p. 3607-3608). Downers Grove, IL: Midwest Theological Forum,, Ignatius Press.

    [37] Ibid. 36, P. 3608

    [38] Academic Community of St. Athanasius Academy of Orthodox Theology (2008). Colossians. In The Orthodox study Bible (p. 1652). Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson.

    [39] Episcopal Church. (1979). Daily Office. In The Book of common prayer: And administration of the sacraments, and other rites and ceremonies of the church, according to the use of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States of America: Together with the psalter, or, Psalms of David (pp. 133). New York, NY: Church Publishing Incorporated

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