April 15 Devotional (2021)

Children, it is the last hour, and as you have heard that antichrist is coming, so now many antichrists have come. Therefore we know that it is the last hour.

A prayer inspired by Damien and Marianne of Molokai, Priest and Leper, who we remember on April 15th

God of compassion, we bless your Name for the ministries of Damien and Marianne, who ministered to the lepers abandoned on Molokai in the Hawaiian Islands. Help us, following their examples, to be bold and loving in confronting the incurable plagues of our time, that your people may live in health and hope; through Jesus Christ, who with you and the Holy Spirit lives and reigns, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.


April 15, 2021
Eastertide

Today’s Readings:  Psalm 4 ; Daniel 9:1-19 ; 1 John 2:18-25


Invitatory

Alleluia! Christ is risen.

The Lord is risen indeed. Alleluia!

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit: as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen. 

Alleluia!

Hymn

“He’s got the whole world in His hands”


Morning Prayer

Morning Canticle: Benedictus Dominus 

      Blessed be the Lord God of Israel, for he hath visited and redeemed his people; And hath raised up a mighty salvation for us in the house of his servant David. As he spake by the mouth of his holy prophets, which have been since the world began: That we should be saved from our enemies, and from the hand of all who hate us; To perform the mercy promised to our forefathers, and to remember his holy covenant; To perform the oath which he swore to our forefather Abraham, that he would give us; That we being delivered out of the hand of our enemies might serve him without fear, In holiness and righteousness before him, all the days of our life. 

      And thou, child, shalt be called the prophet of the Highest, for thou shalt go before the face of the Lord to prepare his ways; To give knowledge of salvation unto his people for the remission of their sins, Through the tender mercy of our God, whereby the dayspring from on high hath visited us; To give light to them that sit in darkness and in the shadow of death, and to guide our feet into the way of peace. [5]

Listen to the prayer –

May God be merciful to us and bless us,* show us the light of his countenance and come to us. 

Psalm 67:1
“Will you trust me?”
(source)

Morning Reading: Psalm 4

God does wonders for the faithful

To the choirmaster: with stringed instruments. A Psalm of David.

1 Answer me when I call, O God of my righteousness!

You have given me relief when I was in distress.

Be gracious to me and hear my prayer!

2 O men, how long shall my honor be turned into shame?

How long will you love vain words and seek after lies? Selah

3 But know that the LORD has set apart the godly for himself;

the LORD hears when I call to him.

4 Be angry, and do not sin;

ponder in your own hearts on your beds, and be silent. Selah

5 Offer right sacrifices,

and put your trust in the LORD.

6 There are many who say, “Who will show us some good?

Lift up the light of your face upon us, O LORD!”

7 You have put more joy in my heart

than they have when their grain and wine abound.

8 In peace I will both lie down and sleep;

for you alone, O LORD, make me dwell in safety.

Morning Lesson

Trust in the Lord 

In Psalm 4, “David complains that his enemies are speaking ill of him as king in an attempt to shame him. He reminds them that God set apart the godly from those who behave in such a manner… God’s word condemns unjust complaints. Through David, God encourages us to… ‘trust in the Lord’ (v. 5).” [3]

Additionally, Psalm 4 “emphasizes the End (vv. 1, 2). Christ ‘is the end of the law for righteousness to everyone who believes’ (Rom 10:4), and He is ‘the Alpha and the Omega, the Beginning and the End’ (Rev. 1:8). He exhorts people not to be slow of heart, and not to love vain things, nor seek after lies (v. 3). Rather, they should realise that the Lord, who is the Father, has made His Holy One, who is Christ, to be wondrous (v. 4) in His death and Resurrection (v. 9).” [4]


OPTIONAL FURTHER READING:
Psalm 4 Commentary from the Early Church

Psalm 4:1-2

“One who seeks mercy from God shows clearly that he does not demand the fruit of his own merit and the debt of his own zeal but that he wishes to benefit from the patience and kindness of God.” 

Theodore of Mopsuestia (350 – 428 A.D.), Commentary on Psalms

Psalm 4:4

“After he said, ‘Be angry,’ he added, ‘And sin not.’ I propose it in the form of a question, as if he had said, ‘Are you angry? Sin not.’ Although one struggles confused and trapped in the offense of a disturbed spirit because of present affairs, although there seem to be so many causes for indignation, nevertheless do not think that it is true what reason and discipline hand over to us, but the spirit disturbed by wrath presses on us. It is the greatest testimony that your own opinion lacks truth because those things that you know, that you speak, have not come from reason but from your experience. 

Theodore of Mopsuestia (350 – 428 A.D.), Commentary on Psalms 

Psalm 4:5

If you wish to explain what it is to hope in everything, we are going to say that it is nothing other than to become an heir of the kingdom of heaven, to receive comfort, to be called the children of God, to see God, to be satisfied by the righteousness for which one hungers and thirsts, to enjoy his abundant mercy and to live in all the things which the true God and our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ promised. 

Origen of Alexandria (184 – 253 A.D.), Selections from the Psalms 

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit: as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen. 

Alleluia!



Midday Prayer

Heavenly Father, send your Holy Spirit into our hearts, to direct and rule us according to your will, to comfort us in all our afflictions, to defend us from all error, and to lead us into all truth; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen. [34]

You strengthen me more and more; you enfold and comfort me. 

Psalm 71:21
DANIEL HUNTINGTON, (American, 1816-1906)
“Figures at prayer”
(source)

Midday Reading: Daniel 9:1-19

Daniel pleads for the people in prayer

1In the first year of Darius the son of Ahasuerus, by descent a Mede, who was made king over the realm of the Chaldeans— 2in the first year of his reign, I, Daniel, perceived in the books the number of years that, according to the word of the LORD to Jeremiah the prophet, must pass before the end of the desolations of Jerusalem, namely, seventy years.

3Then I turned my face to the Lord God, seeking him by prayer and pleas for mercy with fasting and sackcloth and ashes. 4I prayed to the LORD my God and made confession, saying, “O Lord, the great and awesome God, who keeps covenant and steadfast love with those who love him and keep his commandments, 5we have sinned and done wrong and acted wickedly and rebelled, turning aside from your commandments and rules. 6We have not listened to your servants the prophets, who spoke in your name to our kings, our princes, and our fathers, and to all the people of the land. 7To you, O Lord, belongs righteousness, but to us open shame, as at this day, to the men of Judah, to the inhabitants of Jerusalem, and to all Israel, those who are near and those who are far away, in all the lands to which you have driven them, because of the treachery that they have committed against you. 8To us, O LORD, belongs open shame, to our kings, to our princes, and to our fathers, because we have sinned against you. 9To the Lord our God belong mercy and forgiveness, for we have rebelled against him 10and have not obeyed the voice of the LORD our God by walking in his laws, which he set before us by his servants the prophets. 11All Israel has transgressed your law and turned aside, refusing to obey your voice. And the curse and oath that are written in the Law of Moses the servant of God have been poured out upon us, because we have sinned against him. 12He has confirmed his words, which he spoke against us and against our rulers who ruled us,a by bringing upon us a great calamity. For under the whole heaven there has not been done anything like what has been done against Jerusalem. 13As it is written in the Law of Moses, all this calamity has come upon us; yet we have not entreated the favor of the LORD our God, turning from our iniquities and gaining insight by your truth. 14Therefore the LORD has kept ready the calamity and has brought it upon us, for the LORD our God is righteous in all the works that he has done, and we have not obeyed his voice. 15And now, O Lord our God, who brought your people out of the land of Egypt with a mighty hand, and have made a name for yourself, as at this day, we have sinned, we have done wickedly.

16“O Lord, according to all your righteous acts, let your anger and your wrath turn away from your city Jerusalem, your holy hill, because for our sins, and for the iniquities of our fathers, Jerusalem and your people have become a byword among all who are around us. 17Now therefore, O our God, listen to the prayer of your servant and to his pleas for mercy, and for your own sake, O Lord,b make your face to shine upon your sanctuary, which is desolate. 18O my God, incline your ear and hear. Open your eyes and see our desolations, and the city that is called by your name. For we do not present our pleas before you because of our righteousness, but because of your great mercy. 19O Lord, hear; O Lord, forgive. O Lord, pay attention and act. Delay not, for your own sake, O my God, because your city and your people are called by your name.”

Midday Lesson

Daniel’s Prayer for His People

First year of Darius is 539 BC. The books (v. 2) refers to the prophetical books of the Old Testament.

“Jeremiah foretold that Judah would serve its Babylonian conquest for 70 years (Jer 25:11), after which the Lord would bring His exiled people back to Israel (Jer 29:10). Just about 70 years elapsed between the first deportation to Babylon in 605 B.C. (1:1-4) and the decree of Cyrus II in 538 B.C. that allowed Jewish captives to return to their homeland (2 Chron 36:22-23).” [6]

“Sackcloth was a course, hair-spun fabric worn next to the skin (1 Kings 21:27), and ashes were sprinkled on the head (2 Sam 13:19). Both [were] public acts of mourning and repentance.” [7]

“In the spirit of true intercessory prayer, Daniel [took] on himself the sins of the people and repent[ed] before the Lord, begging His mercy for their sakes.” [8]

Righteousness (v. 7) “indicates that Yahweh has been faithful to his covenant obligations to Israel (9:14).” [9]

“This is as clear in defining sin as any passage in the Scriptures. St. Paul offer[ed] a summary of Daniel’s words: ‘All have sinned and fall short of the glory of God’ (Rom 3:23).” [10]

“The curse: The most severe curse of the Deuteronomic covenant, which is expulsion from the land of Israel and exile among foreign nations (Deut 27:14-26).” [11]

“Against Jerusalem: A reference to 586 B.C., when the Babylonians devastated the Holy city and its sanctuary (2 Kings 25:8-10).” [12]

“Daniel’s prayer is a confession of national sin and an appeal for restoration. He [was] aware that Israel’s distress [was] the just result of its disloyalty to the Lord and His covenant, yet he petition[ed] Yahweh to restore blessings to His disgraced people.” [13]

The man Gabriel is “the angel Gabriel Who came to Daniel years earlier appearing as a man (8:15-16).” [14] The evening sacrifice occurred at “approximately 3:00 P.M., when a second round of daily sacrifices (lamb, incense, grain, wine) would have been offered in the Temple (Ex 29:38-42). Though the sanctuary was in ruins in Daniel’s day, the prophet continues to follow the rhythms of Israel’s liturgical life by praying toward Jerusalem at the set times of worship (6:10). Times of sacrifice in the Temple are also times of prayer and supplication to the Lord (Ezra 9:5; Jud 9:1; Ps 141:2; Acts 10:1-4). A parallel example is Zechariah, father of John the Baptist, who will also be greeted by the angel Gabriel at the time of the daily Temple liturgy (Lk 1:8-13, 19).  Just as Daniel is granted a vision of the messianic future (9:24-27), so Zachariah will hear that the time of messianic fulfilment is close-at-hand (Lk 1:14-17).” [15]

“Daniel’s prophecy of the 70 weeks [vv. 24-27]… is a timetable of God’s plan for the future that includes the restoration of Jerusalem after exile, the coming of anointed Messiah, and a second destruction of Jerusalem and its sanctuary. Several details of the oracle are difficult to interpret, and this has resulted in a variety of interpretations in both ancient and modern times. Most can be fitted into 3 categories. (1) Messianic View. The majority of scholars over the centuries interpret the prophecy as culminating in the first century A.D. with the coming of Jesus and the Roman destruction of Jerusalem. This view will be maintained below. (2) Maccabean View. Modern critical scholars, as well as a few figures from antiquity, place the end of the 70 weeks in the second century B.C. with the destruction of the temple under Antiochus IV Epiphanes, an event that helped to spark the Maccabean revolt. Advocates of this view tend to read the numbers of the prophecy as rough approximations rather than precise calculations. (3) Eschatological View. Some theologians in early Christian times, along with modern Dispensationalists, read the text as a prophecy of Christ’s Second Coming and the defeat of the AntiChrist at the consummation of history. Proponents of this interpretation normally insert a parenthesis or gap into the timetable in order to stretch the prophecy into the last days.” [16]

“None of the prophets speak as clearly about Christ as Daniel. Not only does he affirm his [Christ’s] coming, a prediction common to other prophets, but he also indicates the time of his coming (Saint Jerome, Commentary on Daniel, prologue.” [17]

Seventy weeks of years “is not a reinterpretation of Jeremiah’s prophecy of 70 years of exile (Jer 25:11; 29:10), but a recalculation of the penitential period that Israel must undergo because of its failure to repent (9:13-16). In other words, Israel’s spiritual condition necessitates an extension of suffering before God’s mercy is poured out in full measure. This new revelation to Daniel was to prepare Jewish exiles for the disappointing news that the end of the Babylonian Captivity would only be a small beginning; Israel’s full restoration as envisioned by the prophets is the hope of future generations.” [18]

“Multiplying the time of exile by seven has its explanation in Leviticus, where Moses warned that failure to repent in spite of the Lord’s discipline would result in ‘sevenfold’ judgement (Lev 26:18, 21, 24, 28). The seventy weeks is thus equivalent to ten Jubilee cycles, each lasting 49 years (Lev 25:8-12).” [19]

“Several parallels are noticeable between Daniel 9 and Isaiah 53. Both delineate God’s plan to take away human iniquity and replace it with a gift of righteousness (compare 9:24 with Is 53:5-6, 10-12). Likewise, in both oracles this involves the messianic figure being ‘cut off’ by death (compare 9:26 with Is 53:8).” [20]

Verse 25 says, Know therefore and understand that from the going out of the word to restore and build Jerusalem to the coming of an anointed one, a prince, there shall be seven weeks. Then for sixty-two weeks it shall be built again with squares and moat, but in a troubled time. “[To restore] denotes a recovery of political control in self government in Jerusalem (1 Kings 20:34; 2 Kings 14:22); [To build up indicates] a rebuilding of its physical Infrastructure. Historically, these are related to the joint mission of Ezra and Nehemiah in the fifth century B.C., the former reestablishing the governance of Judah and Jerusalem on the basis of Torah (Ezra 7:25-26; 10:1-17) and the latter reconstructing the city’s walls and gates (Neh 3-6). In light of this, the going forth of the word is best identified with the decree of Artaxerxes I given to Ezra in 457 B.C. (Ezra 7:11-26). Counting forward 490 years from this date, the 70th week of the prophecy extends over the 7 years from A.D. 27 to 34, a historical window that encompasses the ministry of Jesus and the birth of the Christian Church.” [21]

The anointed one (v. 25) refers to “a future Prince designed in Hebrew as mashiah or ‘Messiah’. In the NT, the anointing of Jesus is closely connected with the descent of the Spirit at his baptism (Lk 3:33; 4:18; Acts 10:38).” [22]

Squares (v. 25) refers to “public spaces used for religious gatherings, political assemblies, and juridical proceedings (Chron 32:6; Ezra 9:10; Jer 26:10-14). Resumption of community life in Jerusalem is thus envisioned.” [23]

People of the Prince (v. 26) is “perhaps the kinsmen of the Messiah, called a ‘prince’ in 9:25.  Alternatively, one might think of the Romans under the emperor Vespasian, who destroyed Jerusalem in A.D. 70. The historian Josephus, who witnessed the fall of the city first hand, links the desolation prophesied by Daniel with the catastrophe (Antiquities 10, 276).” [24]

A flood (v. 26) refers to “an overwhelming force of devastation. The same Hebrew term denotes unstoppable military might in 11:22.” [25]

Verse 27 says, And he shall make a strong covenant with many for one week, and for half of the week he shall put an end to sacrifice and offering. And on the wing of abominations shall come one who makes desolate, until the decreed end is poured out on the desolator. “This and the events that follow are best understood as a consequence of the 70 weeks, not as their climax, which is linked rather with the coming and cutting off of the Messiah. In other words, the Mosaic system of sacrifice will disappear with the fall of Jerusalem, yet its purpose and efficacy had already ceased once the perfect sacrifice of Christ was offered (Mt 27:51; Mk 15:38; Lk 23:45).” [26]

Strong covenant (v. 27) is “seemingly a reference to the New Covenant ratified by the Messiah (Lk 22:20).” [27]

“The Hebrew kanaph generally means wing [as in the wing of abominations, v. 27] but can also refer to the ‘extremity’ of something. Perhaps the idea is that abominations will reach an extreme degree at the devastation of Jerusalem. Josephus says as much in his eyewitness account (War 5, 442).” [28] 

Poured out on the desolator (v. 27) is “the judgement destined to fall on the conqueror and persecutor of God’s people described in 7:11  As the burning of the 4th beast.” [29]

“The Epistle of barnabas (ch. 16) observes that this passage [vv. 24-27] was fulfilled when the temple (the sanctuary, v. 26) was destroyed by the Romans in AD 70. But Barnabas also points out that a true temple remains, the Body of Christ, a spiritual temple in which God truly dwells. Seventy weeks is interpreted to mean seventy weeks of years, or 490 years (seventy times seven years). This prophecy applies also to Jeremiah’s ‘seventy years.’” [30]

“According to Hyppolytus, Daniel’s vision concerned the time when the temple would be rebuilt, as well as the time of the coming of the Messiah. First, the Jews would return and resume sacrifice after seventy years of captivity. ‘Having mentioned therefore seventy weeks, and having divided them into two parts, in order that what was spoken by him to the profit might be better understood, he proceeds thus, until Messiah the Prince there shall be seven weeks, which make forty-nine years. It was in the twenty-first year [of Nebuchadnezzar’s reign] that Daniel saw these things in Babylon. Hence, the forty-nine years added to the twenty-one, make up the seventy years, of which the blessed Jeremiah spoke.’ Second, Jesus the Messiah would be crucified in AD 30, about 490 years (seventy weeks) after Artaxerxes commissioned Ezra to rebuild the temple in 458 BC.” [31]

“Hippolytus comments that after ‘Christ is come, and the gospel is preached in every place, the times being then accomplished, there will remain only one week, the last, in which Elias will appear, and Enoch. And in the midst of it the abomination of desolations will be manifested, that is, AntiChrist, announcing desolation to the world. And when he comes, the sacrifice and oblation will be removed, which now are offered to God in every place by the nations.‘” [32]


OPTIONAL FURTHER READING:
The Seventy Weeks
[33]

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit: as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen. 

Alleluia!



Eventide Prayer

For Peace.

O God, from whom all holy desires, all good counsels, and all just works do proceed, give unto me, and all Thy servants, that peace which the world cannot give; that both our hearts may be set to obey Thy commandments, and also that by Thee we being defended from the fear of our enemies, may pass our time in rest and quietness, through the merits of Jesus Christ our Saviour. Amen.

~ William Laud, Abp of Canterbury and Martyr [49]

For God alone my soul in silence waits;* from him comes my salvation. 

Psalm 62:1
Antichrist – detail from a fresco at Osogovo Monastery in the Republic of North Macedonia. The inscription reads “All kings and nations bow before the Antichrist.”
(source)

Eventide Reading: 1 John 2:18-25

Remain in union with God

18 Children, it is the last hour, and as you have heard that antichrist is coming, so now many antichrists have come. Therefore we know that it is the last hour. 19 They went out from us, but they were not of us; for if they had been of us, they would have continued with us. But they went out, that it might become plain that they all are not of us. 20 But you have been anointed by the Holy One, and you all have knowledge. 21 I write to you, not because you do not know the truth, but because you know it, and because no lie is of the truth. 22 Who is the liar but he who denies that Jesus is the Christ? This is the antichrist, he who denies the Father and the Son. 23 No one who denies the Son has the Father. Whoever confesses the Son has the Father also. 24 Let what you heard from the beginning abide in you. If what you heard from the beginning abides in you, then you too will abide in the Son and in the Father. 25 And this is the promise that he made to us—eternal life.

“The Preaching of the Antichrist”
detail of Christ and the Devil, from the Chapel of the Madonna di San Brizio, 1499-1504 (fresco) 
by Signorelli, Luca (c.1450-1523); 
Duomo, Orvieto, Umbria, Italy
(source)

Eventide Lesson

Warning Concerning Antichrists

The last hour (v. 18) is “the eleventh hour” (Mt 20:6), the era of the New Covenant. It is “the present age, which began with the coming of Christ and is seen as the final era in salvation history; it is also called ‘the last days,’ ‘the end times,’ etc. Vigilance is necessary for Christians to remain faithful to Christ and to resist sin.” [36] 

In view here is the deception at hand, as opposed to being a prediction of the end of the world. The many antichrists (v. 18) – note that “antichrists” are only mentioned in the Epistles of 1 John and 2 John – are “heretics, through whom the Antichrist of the end times (1Th 2) is doing his spadework.” [37] As Didymus the Blind (313 – 398 A.D.) explained in his commentary on 1 John, “These things are not said of all who teach false doctrine but only of those who join a false sect after they have heard the truth. It is because they were once Christians that they are now called antichrists.” [38]

“Very early in the second century, on his way to martyrdom in Rome [sometime between 98 and 117 A.D.], Saint Ignatius of Antioch wrote, ‘These are the last times [see 1 Co 7:29]. Let us then be ashamed and fear God’s patience so that it may not become condemnation for us. We should either fear the wrath to come or love the grace which is present, one of the two, just so that we may be found in CHrist Jesus for true life [see Acts 17:30; 1 Th 1:10]. Nothing should seem fitting to you apart from him in whom I bear my bonds as spiritual pearls. May I rise again in them by your prayer, in which I may always participate so that I may be found in the lot apportioned to the Ephesian Christians, who have always agreed with the apostles by the power of Jesus Christ.” [39]

Verse 19 says, They went out from us, but they were not of us; for if they had been of us, they would have continued with us. But they went out, that it might become plain that they all are not of us. According to St. Andreas of Crete (650 – July 4, 712 or 726 or 740 A.D.) in his Catena (Catenae), “John says this because there were some people who had become teachers but had subsequently departed from the truth in order to follow the blasphemies of their own minds. But even if they were once among us, John adds, they were never really part of us, since if they had been, they would have stayed with us.” [40] Furthermore, “being on the roll of the Church, even receiving the sacraments, is not enough. We must continue in our belief and manifest the fruit of faith.” [41]

In verse 20, John wrote, But you have been anointed by the Holy One, and you all have knowledge. The word anointed (criso in Greek) “recalls the coronation of kings and the ordination of priests in the OT, which activated the spiritual gifts and energies needed for their offices.” [42] In light of this spiritual anointing of the Holy Ghost, John continued, I write to you, not because you do not know the truth, but because you know it, and because no lie is of the truth. Note the word lie. “This was the heresy of Simon [Magnus], which said that Jesus and the Christ were two different people. According to [Simon Magnus], Jesus was a man, the son of Mary, but Christ descended from heaven in the form of a dove at the Jordan. John therefore condemns those who think like that and brands their belief with the name of the devil. There were still others who made a distinction between the Father and some nameless deity beyond him, whom they called the Father of Christ. These too denied Jesus, saying that he was a mere man and did not have the nature of God” (St. Andreas of Crete). [43]

In regards to theology, “the issues are: (1) Does God the Father have a consubstantial Son? (2) Is the Man Jesus the same Person as God the Son? These, of course, are two basic issues of Christology: that Jesus Christ is one divine Person in two natures.” [44]

John continued (v. 23), No one who denies the Son has the Father. Whoever confesses the Son has the Father also. As St. Bede (673 – 26 May 735) explained, “John is looking for a confession of faith which involves the heart, as well as confessing in both word and deed. He is saying the same thing as the apostle Paul when he wrote [in 1Co 12:3]: ‘No one can say that Jesus is Lord, except by the Holy Spirit,’ which means that unless the Holy Spirit gives us the power to do so, we cannot serve Christ with perfect faith and action.” [45] Therefore, wrote St. Bede,“Follow with all your heart that faith and that teaching which you have received from the apostles at the beginning of the church, for only this will make you partakers of divine grace.” [46]

“Fundamental to the Christian Faith is the belief that Jesus is the Messiah, the Son of God, the Second Person of the Blessed Trinity. To know Christ is to know God the Father since God the Son is the perfect reflection of the Father.” [47] Thankfully, Christians have within them the Holy One. Therefore, “Christians have the certainty of faith because we have received the grace of the Father and the Son through the Holy Spirit at Baptism.” [48]

Compline Prayer

Evening Canticle: Magnificat 

(It is customary to bow at the words: “And holy is his Name…”) 

My soul doth magnify the Lord, and my spirit hath rejoiced in God my Savior. For he hath regarded the lowliness of his handmaiden. For behold from henceforth all generations shall call me blessed. For he that is mighty hath magnified me, and holy is his Name. And his mercy is on them that fear him throughout all generations. He hath shown strength with his arm; he hath scattered the proud in the imagination of their hearts. He hath put down the mighty from their seat, and hath exalted the humble and meek. He hath filled the hungry with good things, and the rich he hath sent empty away. He remembering his mercy hath holden his servant Israel, as he promised to our forefathers, Abraham and his seed for ever. [50]

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit: as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen. 

Alleluia!


Devotionals compiled/written by S.P. Rogers

Citations:

[1] .N/A

[2] The hymnal 1982: According to the use of the Episcopal CHURCH 183. Christians, to the PASCHAL VICTIM. (n.d.). Retrieved March 19, 2021, from https://hymnary.org/hymn/EH1982/183

[3] House, C. P. (2009). Psalms. In HOLY BIBLE: The lutheran study bible (p. 849). St. Louis, MO: Concordia Publishing HSE.

[4] Academic Community of St. Athanasius Academy of Orthodox Theology (2008). Psalms. In The Orthodox study Bible (p. 714). Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson.

[5] Cobb, D., & Olsen, D. A. (2014). Saint Augustine’s prayer book: A book of devotions (Kindle ed., p. 32). Cincinnati, OH: Forward Movement.

[6] Hahn, S., Mitch, C., & Walters, D. (2013). Commentary. In Daniel (Sec Catholic ed., p. 2208). San Francisco, CA: Ignatius Press.

[7] Ibid. 6, P. 2212

[8] Academic Community of St. Athanasius Academy of Orthodox Theology (2008). Daniel. In The Orthodox study Bible (p. 1293). Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson.

[9] Hahn, S., Mitch, C., & Walters, D. (2013). Commentary. In Daniel (Sec Catholic ed., p. 2216). San Francisco, CA: Ignatius Press.

[10] Academic Community of St. Athanasius Academy of Orthodox Theology (2008). Daniel. In The Orthodox study Bible (p. 1293). Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson.

[11] Hahn, S., Mitch, C., & Walters, D. (2013). Commentary. In Daniel (Sec Catholic ed., p. 2222). San Francisco, CA: Ignatius Press.

[12] Ibid. 11

[13] Ibid. 11, P. 2215

[14] Ibid. 11, P. 2231

[15] Ibid. 11, P. 2231

[16] Ibid. 11, P. 2241

[17] Ibid. 11, P. 2241

[18] Ibid. 11, P. 2252

[19] Ibid. 11, P. 2252

[20] Ibid. 11, P. 2252

[21] Ibid. 11, P. 2261

[22] Ibid. 11, P. 2261

[23] Ibid. 11, P. 2261

[24] Ibid. 11, P. 2270

[25] Ibid. 11, P. 2270

[26] Ibid. 11, P. 2280

[27] Ibid. 11, P. 2280

[28] Ibid. 11, P. 2280

[29] Ibid. 11, P. 2280

[30] Academic Community of St. Athanasius Academy of Orthodox Theology (2008). Daniel. In The Orthodox study Bible (p. 1293). Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson.

[31] Ibid. 30

[32] Ibid. 30

[33] House, C. P. (2009). The Seventy Weeks [Image]. In HOLY BIBLE: The lutheran study bible (p. 1417). St. Louis, MO: Concordia Publishing HSE.

[34] Episcopal Church. (1979). Daily Office. In The Book of common prayer: And administration of the sacraments, and other rites and ceremonies of the church, according to the use of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States of America: Together with the psalter, or, Psalms of David (pp. 107). New York, NY: Church Publishing Incorporated.

[35] N/A

[36] Cole, J. (Ed.). (2015). 1 John. In Didache Bible: With commentaries based on the Catechism of the Catholic Church (Kindle ed., p. 3777). Downers Grove,, IL: Midwest Theological Forum,, Ignatius Press.

[37] Academic Community of St. Athanasius Academy of Orthodox Theology (2008). 1 John. In The Orthodox study Bible (p. 1731). Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson.

[38] Didymus the Blind. (2019). 1 John. In Ancient faith study Bible (Kindle ed., p. 3539). Nashville: Holman Bible.

[39] Academic Community of St. Athanasius Academy of Orthodox Theology (2008). 1 John. In The Orthodox study Bible (p. 1731). Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson.

[40] Andrew of Crete. (2019). 1 John. In Ancient faith study Bible (Kindle ed., p. 3530). Nashville: Holman Bible.

[41] Academic Community of St. Athanasius Academy of Orthodox Theology (2008). 1 John. In The Orthodox study Bible (p. 1731). Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson.

[42] Ibid, 41

[43] Andrew of Crete. (2019). 1 John. In Ancient faith study Bible (Kindle ed., p. 3530). Nashville: Holman Bible.

[44] Academic Community of St. Athanasius Academy of Orthodox Theology (2008). 1 John. In The Orthodox study Bible (p. 1731). Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson.

[45] Bede the Venerable. (2019). 1 John. In Ancient faith study Bible (Kindle ed., p. 3530). Nashville: Holman Bible.

[46] Ibid. 45

[47] Cole, J. (Ed.). (2015). 1 John. In Didache Bible: With commentaries based on the Catechism of the Catholic Church (Kindle ed., p. 3777). Downers Grove,, IL: Midwest Theological Forum,, Ignatius Press.

[48] Ibid. 47

[49] LAUD, W. (1855). Thursday: For Peace. In The Private Devotions of Dr. William Laud, Archbishop of Canterbury and Martyr (Ebook ed., p. 40). London and Oxford: John Henry & Jas. Parker.


[50] Cobb, D., & Olsen, D. A. (2014). Saint Augustine’s prayer book: A book of devotions (Kindle ed., p. 34). Cincinnati, OH: Forward Movement.

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