February 13 Devotional (2021)

And when he drew near and saw the city, he wept…

February 13, 2021
Epiphanytide

Today’s Readings: 1 Kings 15:33-16:7; Luke 19:41-44; “Night Is Drawing” by Sabine Baring-Gould


Come let us praise the Lord with joy: let us joyfully sing to God our saviour. Let us come before his presence with thanksgiving; and make a joyful noise to him with psalms.

Morning Invocation

The earth is the Lord’s for he made it: Come let us adore him.

Opening Prayer

O LORD, be gracious unto us, for we have waited for Thee; be Thou our arm every morning, our salvation also in the time of trouble. Amen.

Bp Lancelot Andrewes [1]

The Hymn

“Rejoice”

By Charles Wesley

Lyrics:

Rejoice, the Lord is King! 

Your Lord and King adore! 

Mortals, give thanks and sing, 

And triumph ever more. 

Lift up your heart! 

Lift up your voice! 

Rejoice! Again I say, Rejoice! 

The Lord the Savior reigns, 

The God of truth and love: 

When he had purged our stains, 

He took his seat above. 

Lift up your heart! 

Lift up your voice! 

Rejoice! Again I say, Rejoice! 

His kingdom can not fail; 

He rules over earth and heaven; 

The keys of death and hell 

To Christ the Lord are given. 

Lift up your heart! 

Lift up your voice! 

Rejoice! Again I say, Rejoice! 

Rejoice in glorious hope! 

Our Lord the Judge shall come, 

And take his servants up 

To their eternal home. 

Lift up your heart! 

Lift up your voice! 

Rejoice! Again I say, Rejoice! [2]

Jehu on the Black Obelisk of Shalmaneser III.  This is “the only portrayal we have in ancient Near Eastern art of an Israelite or Judaean monarch.
(source)

Morning Reading: 1 Kings 15:33-16:7

Jehu warns King Baasha

33 In the third year of Asa king of Judah, Baasha the son of Ahijah began to reign over all Israel at Tirzah, and he reigned twenty-four years. 34He did what was evil in the sight of the LORD and walked in the way of Jeroboam and in his sin which he made Israel to sin.

1 And the word of the LORD came to Jehu the son of Hanani against Baasha, saying, 2 “Since I exalted you out of the dust and made you leader over my people Israel, and you have walked in the way of Jeroboam and have made my people Israel to sin, provoking me to anger with their sins, 3 behold, I will utterly sweep away Baasha and his house, and I will make your house like the house of Jeroboam the son of Nebat. 4 Anyone belonging to Baasha who dies in the city the dogs shall eat, and anyone of his who dies in the field the birds of the heavens shall eat.”5 Now the rest of the acts of Baasha and what he did, and his might, are they not written in the Book of the Chronicles of the Kings of Israel? 6 And Baasha slept with his fathers and was buried at Tirzah, and Elah his son reigned in his place. 7 Moreover, the word of the LORD came by the prophet Jehu the son of Hanani against Baasha and his house, both because of all the evil that he did in the sight of the LORD, provoking him to anger with the work of his hands, in being like the house of Jeroboam, and also because he destroyed it.

Queen Jezebel Being Punished by Jehu (1637–1712)
By Andrea Celesti
(source)

Morning Lesson

Destruction of Baasha’s household foretold

Baasha came to rule in the “year of Asa,” that is, in 909 BC. “Of lowly origin in the tribe of Issachar (v. 27), Baasha reigned two years longer than Jeroboam, the founder of the Ephraimite dynasty, which Baasha displaced.” [3] 1 King 15:16-22 describes his hostile relationship with Judah’s kings. 

Jehu was a prophet, “not to be confused with the later Isrealite king by the same name (2Ki 10:28-36). The prophet’s denunciation of Baasha was not motivated by political prejudice; he also rebuked a king of Judah (2Ch 19:2).” [4]

“As the son of the prophet Hanani whom Asa had executed (2 Chr. 16:7-10), Jehu… came from the southern kingdom. His long prophetic ministry lasted into the days of Jehoshaphat. Like his father before him, he confronted sins fearlessly – even in the royal house.” [5]

“In the ancient Middle East considerable attention was given to the proper care of the body of the diseased. Usually the body was interred on the day of death. When a body was left to the dogs and the birds, an intolerable feeling of shame extended to all family and friends of the deceased. For examples see the ignoble ends of King Ahab (22:38) and Queen Jezebel (2 Kin. 9:33-37).” [6]

“Because of the evil of Israel’s king Baasha, the Lord predict[ed] that his house, like that of Jeroboam, [would] be cut off (16:3). But God’s grace to families and households persists, even for us. The great King of heaven confirms us as members of His household. ●  Lord, bless this house, whate’er befall; may Jesus Christ be all in all. Amen.” [7]

Short Verse

Proclaim with me the greatness of the LORD;* 

let us exalt his Name together. 

Psalm 34:3

Morning Prayer

O God,

     Who drove back the darkness

     and assigned light for the day,

          pour out on Your servants

          the coming of the true Light;

     You reign forever. Amen. [8]

Blessing

May Christ, the Son of God, be manifest in you, that your lives may be a light to the world; and the blessing of God Almighty, the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit, be among you, and remain with you always. Amen. [9]


A prayer inspired by Absalom Jones and Richard Allen, who we remember on February 13th

Set us free, heavenly Father, from every bond of prejudice and Fear: that, honoring the steadfast courage of your servants Absalom Jones and Richard Allen, we may show forth in our lives the reconciling love and true freedom of the children of God, which you have given us in our Saviour Jesus Christ, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever. Amen.


Today if you shall hear his voice, harden not your hearts.
Jesus Wept
by Brian-Micheloe-Doss
(source)

Midday Reading: Luke 19:41-44

The time of God’s visitation

41 And when he drew near and saw the city, he wept over it, 42 saying, “Would that you, even you, had known on this day the things that make for peace! But now they are hidden from your eyes. 43 For the days will come upon you, when your enemies will set up a barricade around you and surround you and hem you in on every side 44 and tear you down to the ground, you and your children within you. And they will not leave one stone upon another in you, because you did not know the time of your visitation.”

Midday Lesson

And Jesus wept

Today’s reading follows just after Christ’s triumphal entrance to Jerusalem down the Mount of Olive along Palm Sunday Road. “Jesus knew how short-lived the celebration would be. He would be dead before the end of the week.” [10]

“Jerusalem means ‘foundation of peace.’ Only faith in Christ brings true peace – a truth hidden from a city that [would] soon rebel against its Savior… The destruction of Jerusalem that Jesus fore[told] would occur in AD 70 [when Jerusalem was utterly destroyed by Rome]. This also describes the spiritual end of every person who lacks faith.” [11]

“Jesus [wept] over Jerusalem’s present blindness and future fate. His heart still breaks for those who have not yet received His Word. Pray for your family, friends, and neighbours, that they would receive Jesus, who came in compassion to seek and save the lost. ●  ‘Ride on, ride on in majesty! In lowly pomp ride on to die. Bow Thy meek head to mortal pain, Then take, O God, Thy pow’r and reign.’ Amen.” [12]

Short Verse

In God, whose word I praise, in God I trust and will not be afraid,* 

for what can flesh do to me? 

Psalm 56:4

Midday Prayer

For Travelers
O God, our heavenly Father, whose glory fills the whole creation, and whose presence we find wherever we go: Preserve those who travel [in particular _______________]; surround them with your loving care; protect them from every danger; and bring them in safety to their journey’s end; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen. [13]


For the Lord is a great God, and a great King above all gods. For in his hand are all the ends of the earth: and the heights of the mountains are his.
When the night is falling
By Katerina Kovatcheva
(source)

Evensong Reading:

Night Is Drawing 

By Sabine Baring-Gould

Nigh Now the day is over, night is drawing nigh, 

    Shadows of the evening steal across the sky. 

Jesus, give the weary calm and sweet repose; 

    With your tenderest blessing may our eyelids close. 

Grant to little children visions bright of thee. 

    Guard the sailors tossing on the sea. 

Comfort every sufferer watching late in pain; 

    Those who plan some evil from their sin restrain. 

Through the long night watches may your angels spread 

    Their wings above me, watching round my bed. 

When the morning wakens then I may arise 

    Pure and fresh and sinless in your holy eyes. [14]

Short Verse

For you are all children of light, children of the day. We are not of the night or of the darkness. 

1 Thessalonians 5:5

Evensong Prayer

Almighty, everlasting God, let our prayer in your sight be as incense, the lifting up of our hands as the evening sacrifice. Give us grace to behold you, present in your Word and Sacraments, and to recognize you in the lives of those around us. Stir up in us the flame of that love which burned in the heart of your Son as he bore his passion, and let it burn in us to eternal life and to the ages of ages. Amen. [15]

Concluding Prayer of the Church

A Collect for Saturdays

We give you thanks, O God, for revealing your Son Jesus Christ to us by the light of his resurrection: Grant that as we sing your glory at the close of this day, our joy may abound in the morning as we celebrate the Paschal mystery; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen. [16]


Devotionals compiled/written by S.P. Rogers

Citations:

[1] Andrews, L. (n.d.). Saturday. In Private Devotions and Manual for the Sick of Lancelot Andrewes (Kindle ed., p. 1989). LEEAF.com Classics.

[2] Tickle, P. (2006). February. In The divine hours: Prayers for Springtime (Kindle ed., vol. 2, p. 64). New York, NY: Image Books.

[3] House, C. P. (2009). 1 Kings. In HOLY BIBLE: The lutheran study bible (p. 564). St. Louis, MO: Concordia Publishing HSE.

[4] Ibid. 3

[5] Radmacher, E. D., Allen, R. B., & House, H. W. (2007). 1 Kings. In NKJV study Bible: New King James Version (Second ed., p. 549). Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson.

[6] Ibid. 5

[7] House, C. P. (2009). 1 Kings. In HOLY BIBLE: The lutheran study bible (p. 565). St. Louis, MO: Concordia Publishing HSE.

[8] Stratman, P. (2001). [adapted from] Morning Prayers. In Prayers from the Ancient Celtic Church (Kindle ed., p. 14). Rossway.

[9] The Episcopal Church. (2018). Seasonal Blessings: Christmas. In The Book of Occasional Services (PDF ed., p. 9). Then Episcopal Church. Retrieved November December 15, 2020, from https://episcopalchurch.org/files/lm_book_of_occasional_services_2018.pdf

[10] House, C. P. (2009). Luke. In HOLY BIBLE: The lutheran study bible (p. 1757). St. Louis, MO: Concordia Publishing HSE.

[11] Academic Community of St. Athanasius Academy of Orthodox Theology (2008). Luke. In The Orthodox study Bible (p. 1422). Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson.

[12] House, C. P. (2009). Luke. In HOLY BIBLE: The lutheran study bible (p. 1757). St. Louis, MO: Concordia Publishing HSE.

[13] Episcopal Church. (1979). Prayers and Thanksgivings. In The Book of common prayer: And administration of the sacraments, and other rites and ceremonies of the church, according to the use of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States of America: Together with the psalter, or, Psalms of David (pp. 831). New York, NY: Church Publishing Incorporated.

[14] Tickle, P. (2006). February. In The divine hours: Prayers for Springtime (Kindle ed., vol. 2, p. 73). New York, NY: Image Books.

[15] Episcopal Church. (1979). Daily Office: An order for Worship in the Evening. In The Book of common prayer: And administration of the sacraments, and other rites and ceremonies of the church, according to the use of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States of America: Together with the psalter, or, Psalms of David (pp. 113). New York, NY: Church Publishing Incorporated.

[16] Episcopal Church. (1979). Daily Office: An Order for Compline. In The Book of common prayer: And administration of the sacraments, and other rites and ceremonies of the church, according to the use of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States of America: Together with the psalter, or, Psalms of David (pp. 134). New York, NY: Church Publishing Incorporated.

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