January 28 Devotional

Moses pleaded, “O Lord GOD… Please let me go over and see the good land beyond the Jordan, that good hill country…”

January 28, 2021
Epiphanytide

Today’s Readings: Psalm 111; Deuteronomy 3:23-29; Romans 9:6-18


Come let us praise the Lord with joy: let us joyfully sing to God our saviour. Let us come before his presence with thanksgiving; and make a joyful noise to him with psalms.

Morning Invocation

The earth is the Lord’s for he made it: Come let us adore him.

Opening Prayer

Heavenly Father, in you we live and move and have our being: We humbly pray you so to guide and govern us by your Holy Spirit, that in all the cares and occupations of our life we may not forget you, but may remember that we are ever walking in your sight; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen. [1]

The Hymn

Doxology 

By Isaac Watts

Lyrics:

Praise God from whom all blessings flow; 

Praise him, all creatures here below;

Praise him above, you heavenly host: 

Praise Father, Son, and Holy Ghost. [2]

Short Verse

I rise before dawn and cry for help; I hope in your words. 

Psalm 119:147

Morning Reading: Psalm 111

The beginning of wisdom

1  Alleluia!

I will give thanks to the LORD with my whole heart,

in the company of the upright, in the congregation.

2 Great are the works of the LORD,

studied by all who delight in them.

3 Full of splendor and majesty is his work,

and his righteousness endures forever.

4 He has caused his wondrous works to be remembered;

the LORD is gracious and merciful.

5 He provides food for those who fear him;

he remembers his covenant forever.

6 He has shown his people the power of his works,

in giving them the inheritance of the nations.

7 The works of his hands are faithful and just;

all his precepts are trustworthy;

8 they are established forever and ever,

to be performed with faithfulness and uprightness.

9 He sent redemption to his people;

he has commanded his covenant forever.

Holy and awesome is his name!

10 The fear of the LORD is the beginning of wisdom;

all those who practice it have a good understanding.

His praise endures forever!

Morning Lesson

Alleluia!

Psalm 111 begins with the world Alleluia, “which emphasizes praise and thanksgiving to the Lord with one’s whole heart (vv. 1, 3, 10). The Church (assembly, v. 1) praises and thanks him for all his works (vv. 2, 3, 6, 7), especially those related to His eternal covenant (vv. 5, 9). The beginning of wisdom is the fear of the Lord because of all His works. Those who have this fear have a good understanding (v. 10) and therefore will offer continual praise.” [3]

Morning Prayer

We pray this morning

    to the Lord who rose again, 

        that we also may rise again in eternal life

    forever and ever, Amen. [4]

Blessing

May God, who sent the Holy Spirit to rest upon the Only- begotten at his baptism in the Jordan River, pour out that Spirit on you who have come to the waters of new birth. Amen. [5]


A prayer inspired by Saint Thomas Aquinas, Priest, Friar, and Theologian, who the Church remembers on January 28th

Almighty God, you have enriched your Church with the singular Learning and holiness of your servant Thomas Aquinas: Enlighten us more and more, we pray, by the disciplined thinking and teaching of Christian scholars, and deepen our devotion by the example of saintly lives; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.


Today if you shall hear his voice, harden not your hearts.

Short Verse

…You hold me by my right hand. 

You will guide me by your counsel,* and afterwards receive me with glory.

Psalm 73:23–24
“Moses by J.J. Tissot”
(source)

Midday Reading: Deuteronomy 3:23-29

Moses sees Canaan from afar

23 “And I pleaded with the LORD at that time, saying, 24 ‘O Lord GOD, you have only begun to show your servant your greatness and your mighty hand. For what god is there in heaven or on earth who can do such works and mighty acts as yours? 25 Please let me go over and see the good land beyond the Jordan, that good hill country and Lebanon.’ 26 But the LORD was angry with me because of you and would not listen to me. And the LORD said to me, ‘Enough from you; do not speak to me of this matter again. 27 Go up to the top of Pisgah and lift up your eyes westward and northward and southward and eastward, and look at it with your eyes, for you shall not go over this Jordan. 28 But charge Joshua, and encourage and strengthen him, for he shall go over at the head of this people, and he shall put them in possession of the land that you shall see.’ 29 So we remained in the valley opposite Beth-peor.


Mount Nebo


“Moses Blesses Joshua Before the High Priest
(watercolor circa 1896–1902 by James Tissot)
(source)

Midday Lesson

Joshua as a type of Christ

“The name Joshua in the Hebrew language of the Old Testament was translated into the Greek language as Jesus. This was true in the Greek Old Testament as well as in the New. This name means ‘The Lord is Salvation.'” [6]

“Thus, the Jesus or Joshua in the Old Testament was a type of Jesus in the New. He was a type of Jesus in that he [would] cause them to inherit the land of Canaan. But Joshua was not able to give Israel rest in their souls (Heb 4:8). However, the Lord Jesus said ‘Come to Me, all you who labor and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest. Take My yoke upon you and learn from Me, for I am gentle, and lowly in heart, and you will find rest for your souls. For My yoke is easy and My burden is light’ (Mt 11:28-30). Therefore, the Lord Jesus is salvation.” [7]

Midday Prayer

For our Enemies

O God, the Father of all, whose Son commanded us to love our enemies: Lead them and us from prejudice to truth: deliver them and us from hatred, cruelty, and revenge; and in your good time enable us all to stand reconciled before you, through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen. [8]


For the Lord is a great God, and a great King above all gods. For in his hand are all the ends of the earth: and the heights of the mountains are his.

Short Verse

Lord, you are in the midst of us, and we are called by your Name: Do not forsake us, O Lord our God.   

Jeremiah 14:9,22
Study of draped female figure – associated with Evelyn De Morgan’s oil painting “Mercy and Truth have met together”
(source)

Evensong Reading: Romans 9:6-18

God’s mercy cannot be controlled

6 But it is not as though the word of God has failed. For not all who are descended from Israel belong to Israel, 7 and not all are children of Abraham because they are his offspring, but “Through Isaac shall your offspring be named.” 8 This means that it is not the children of the flesh who are the children of God, but the children of the promise are counted as offspring. 9 For this is what the promise said: “About this time next year I will return, and Sarah shall have a son.” 10 And not only so, but also when Rebekah had conceived children by one man, our forefather Isaac, 11 though they were not yet born and had done nothing either good or bad—in order that God’s purpose of election might continue, not because of works but because of him who calls— 12 she was told, “The older will serve the younger.” 13 As it is written, “Jacob I loved, but Esau I hated.”

14 What shall we say then? Is there injustice on God’s part? By no means! 15 For he says to Moses, “I will have mercy on whom I have mercy, and I will have compassion on whom I have compassion.” 16 So then it depends not on human will or exertion, but on God, who has mercy. 17 For the Scripture says to Pharaoh, “For this very purpose I have raised you up, that I might show my power in you, and that my name might be proclaimed in all the earth.” 18 So then he has mercy on whomever he wills, and he hardens whomever he wills.

Evensong Lesson

Divine mercy

In our reading today from Romans, “Jewish unbelief is illuminated by Paul’s description of a twofold Israel: one spiritual and the other physical. God is faithful to all Israel, but the issue is this: Who is a true child of Abraham?” [9]

“It is not Abraham’s children of the flesh, his natural or biological offspring, who are his true children. If this were the case, the children of Hagar (Gn. 16:4, 15) and of Keturah (Gn. 25:1-4) would be Israelites. Furthermore, not all those in Isaac’s line are Israelites; otherwise Esau and the Edomites would be. Abraham’s true children are the ‘children of the promise’ (v. 8), that is, those who are in Isaac [verse 7, “through Isaac”], which means faithful believers. Because Isaac was miraculously conceived through God’s promise, which Abraham believed (Gn. 18:10-15; 21:1-7), it is those who continue in this faith who are Abraham’s true offspring.” [10]

“Both Jacob and Esau were born of Isaac and Rebecca, yet only Jacob is considered the seed of Abraham. Jacob’s position is clearly not the result of mere human lineage, but is secured because he is the child of the promise. Both Jacob and Esau were called to salvation, for God loves all equally.” [3] When the Lord said, “but I have hated Esau,” He did “not mean God did not love Esau. Rather, God foresaw the wickedness Esau would choose and hated it. Likewise, God foresaw Jacob’s faith and obedience and knew Jacob would serve His purposes.” [11]

“At Mt. Sinai, some of the idolatrous Jews perished while others survived (Ex 32; 33), though God does not explain why He made this distinction. Likewise, Pharaoh opposed God, and thus God used his arrogance to accomplish the divine will. The actions of God’s will are neither capricious nor vindictive, but are based in divine mercy and compassion. Even though mankind does not understand the basis of God’s decisions (see Is 55:8, 9), we trust His grace and righteousness, upon which our salvation rests.” [12]

Evensong Prayer

The General Thanksgiving

Almighty God, Father of all mercies,

we your unworthy servants give you humble thanks

for all your goodness and loving-kindness

to us and to all whom you have made.

We bless you for our creation, preservation,

and all the blessings of this life;

but above all for your immeasurable love

in the redemption of the world by our Lord Jesus Christ;

for the means of grace, and for the hope of glory.

And, we pray, give us such an awareness of your mercies,

that with truly thankful hearts we may show forth your praise,

not only with our lips, but in our lives,

by giving up our selves to your service,

and by walking before you

in holiness and righteousness all our days;

through Jesus Christ our Lord,

to whom, with you and the Holy Spirit,

be honor and glory throughout all ages. Amen. [13]

Concluding Prayer of the Church

A Compline Prayer:

Look down, O Lord, from your heavenly throne, and illumine this night with your celestial brightness; that by night as by day your people may glorify your holy Name; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen. [14]


Devotionals compiled/written by S.P. Rogers

Citations:

[1] Episcopal Church. (1979). Daily Office: Daily Morning Prayers Rite II. In The Book of common prayer: And administration of the sacraments, and other rites and ceremonies of the church, according to the use of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States of America: Together with the psalter, or, Psalms of David (pp. 100). New York, NY: Church Publishing Incorporated.

[2] Tickle, P. (2006). January. In The divine hours: Prayers for Autumn and Wintertime (Kindle ed., vol. 2, p. 597). New York, NY: Image Books.

[3] Academic Community of St. Athanasius Academy of Orthodox Theology (2008). Psalms. In The Orthodox study Bible (p. 788). Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson.

[4] Stratman, P. (2001). Morning Prayers. In Prayers from the Ancient Celtic Church (Kindle ed., p. 15). Rossway.

[5] The Episcopal Church. (2018). Seasonal Blessings: Christmas. In The Book of Occasional Services (PDF ed., p. 9). Then Episcopal Church. Retrieved November December 15, 2020, from https://episcopalchurch.org/files/lm_book_of_occasional_services_2018.pdf

[6] Academic Community of St. Athanasius Academy of Orthodox Theology (2008). Deuteronomy. In The Orthodox study Bible (p. 286). Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson.

[7] Ibid. 7

[8] Episcopal Church. (1979). Prayers and Thanksgivings: A Prayer of Self-Dedication. In The Book of common prayer: And administration of the sacraments, and other rites and ceremonies of the church, according to the use of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States of America: Together with the psalter, or, Psalms of David (pp. 816). New York, NY: Church Publishing Incorporated.

[9] Academic Community of St. Athanasius Academy of Orthodox Theology (2008). Romans. In The Orthodox study Bible (p. 1568). Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson.

[10] Ibid. 9

[11] Ibid. 9

[12] Ibid. 9

[13] Episcopal Church. (1979). Daily Office: Daily Evening Prayers Rite II. In The Book of common prayer: And administration of the sacraments, and other rites and ceremonies of the church, according to the use of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States of America: Together with the psalter, or, Psalms of David (pp. 125). New York, NY: Church Publishing Incorporated.

[14] Episcopal Church. (1979). Daily Office: An Order for Compline. In The Book of common prayer: And administration of the sacraments, and other rites and ceremonies of the church, according to the use of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States of America: Together with the psalter, or, Psalms of David (pp. 132). New York, NY: Church Publishing Incorporated.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

Create your website with WordPress.com
Get started
%d bloggers like this: