December 22 Devotional (2020)

December 22, 2020
Fourth Week of Advent

Today’s Readings: Luke 1:46-55; 1 Samuel 1:1-28; Hebrews 9:1-14


O God, make speed to save us.
O Lord, make haste to help us.

The Invitatory

Our King and Savior now draws near: 

Watch, for you know not when the master of the house will come, in the evening, or at midnight, or at cockcrow, or in the morning; lest he come suddenly and find you asleep.

Our King and Savior now draws near: O Come, let us adore him.

🕇 Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit: as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Alleluia!

Opening Prayer

Collect of the Week:

Purify our conscience, Almighty God, by your daily visitation, that your Son Jesus Christ, at his coming, may find in us a mansion prepared for himself; who lives and reigns with you,

in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever. Amen. [1]

The Hymn

“Rejoice! rejoice, believers”

By Laurentius Laurenti

1 Rejoice! rejoice, believers, and let your lights appear!

The evening is advancing, and darker night is near.

The Bridegroom is arising, and soon he will draw nigh;

up, watch with expectation! at the midnight comes the cry.

2 See that your lamps are burning, replenish them with oil;

look now for your salvation, the end of sin and toil.

The marriage-feast is waiting, the gates wide open stand;

Rise up, ye heirs of glory, the Bridegroom is at hand!

3 Our hope and expectation, O Jesus, now appear;

Arise, thou Sun so longed for, above this darkened sphere!

With hearts and hands uplifted, we plead, O Lord, to see

the day of earth’s redemption, and ever be with thee! [2]

Antiphon 

The prophets did foretell: that the Saviour should be born of the Virgin Mary.

The angel Gabriel was sent to Mary: a virgin espoused to Joseph. 

How shall this be, O angel of God, seeing I know not a man: Hearken Mary, O Virgin of Christ, the Holy Ghost shall come upon thee, and the power of the Highest shall overshadow thee.

[3]
“Jump For Joy -Mary and Elizabeth” 
(source)

Morning Reading: Luke 1:46-55

The Magnificat 

(The Song of Mary)

My soul proclaims the greatness of the Lord,

my spirit rejoices in God my Savior; *

for he has looked with favor on his lowly servant.

From this day all generations will call me blessed: *

the Almighty has done great things for me,

and holy is his Name.

He has mercy on those who fear him *

in every generation.

He has shown the strength of his arm, *

he has scattered the proud in their conceit.

He has cast down the mighty from their thrones, *

and has lifted up the lowly.

He has filled the hungry with good things, *

and the rich he has sent away empty.

He has come to the help of his servant Israel, *

for he has remembered his promise of mercy,

The promise he made to our fathers, *

to Abraham and his children for ever.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit: *

as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen. [4]

“The Meeting of Mary and Elisabeth”  
by Carl Heinrich Bloch
(source)

Morning Lesson 

About the Magnificat

“This song of praise, also known as ‘The Song of Mary,’ is from the account in Lk 1:46-55 of Mary’s visit to her relative Elizabeth when Mary was pregnant with Jesus and Elizabeth was pregnant with John the Baptist. It is attributed to Mary in the Lucan narrative, but a minority of ancient authorities attributed it to Elizabeth. The term is from the opening words of the passage in the Latin Vulgate, Magnificat anima mea Dominum (‘My soul magnifies the Lord’). The Magnificat strongly resembles and may have been modeled after the Song of Hannah (1 Sm 2:1-10), which is quite similar in its structure and themes. Both songs emphasize God’s holiness and power, God’s option for the poor and judgment on the rich, the fulfillment of God’s promises, and the redemption of God’s people.” [5]

“The Magnificat is the traditional canticle of vespers. It was the only canticle for use after the first lesson of Evensong in the 1549 BCP. It was not used in the 1789 American BCP, but it was restored in the 1892 BCP. The 1928 BCP allowed its use as the only canticle at Evening Prayer when one lesson was read. The 1979 BCP permits use of the Magnificat at both Morning Prayer and Evening Prayer. It appears as Canticles 3 and 15 in the BCP, and it is printed in both the Rite 1 and Rite 2 forms for Evening Prayer. It may also be used at the Act of Thanksgiving in the Thanksgiving for the Birth or Adoption of a Child (BCP, pp. 441-442).” [6]

“The Hymnal 1982 has a variety of settings for the Magnificat (S 242-S 247), including Plainsong, Tonus Peregrinus, adapted by Bruce E. Ford (S 242) and the setting Cathedral of the Isles by Betty Carr Pulkingham (S 247). The hymn text “Tell out, my soul” by Timothy Dudley-Smith (Hymns 437-438) is based on the Song of Mary.” [7]

Antiphon 

As soon as the voice of thy salutation sounded in mine ears: the babe leaped in my womb for Joy. Alleluia!

Thine Almighty Word, O Lord, leapeth down from heaven: out of Thy royal throne. Alleluia!

[8]

Morning Prayer

For all expectant mothers:

Lord Jesus Christ, whose blessed Mother knew the joy of anticipation as well as the fears of childbirth: Grant all expectant mothers the grace of a quiet mind during these days of waiting, and the strength and courage that they shall need when the time of delivery is near. And may the children that shall be born to them bring blessing, and be a blessing always. Amen. [9, adapted]

The Blessing

May the Sun of Righteousness shine upon us and scatter the darkness from before our paths; and the blessing of God Almighty, the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit, be among us, and remain with us always. Amen. [49]


O God, make speed to save us.
O Lord, make haste to help us.

The Invitatory

Our King and Savior now draws near: 

In the wilderness prepare the way of the Lord, make straight in the desert a highway for our God. 

Our King and Savior now draws near: O Come, let us adore him.

🕇 Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit: as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Alleluia!

Antiphon 

The Lord cometh; go ye out to meet Him, saying, great is His dominion, and of His kingdom there shall be no end: the mighty God, the everlasting Father, the Prince of Peace. Alleluia! Alleluia!

[10]
By Chola Loca 
(source)

Midday Reading: 1 Samuel 1:1-28

Hannah is promised a child

1 There was a certain man of Ramathaim-zophim of the hill country of Ephraim whose name was Elkanah the son of Jeroham, son of Elihu, son of Tohu, son of Zuph, an Ephrathite. 2 He had two wives. The name of the one was Hannah, and the name of the other, Peninnah. And Peninnah had children, but Hannah had no children.

3 Now this man used to go up year by year from his city to worship and to sacrifice to the LORD of hosts at Shiloh, where the two sons of Eli, Hophni and Phinehas, were priests of the LORD. 4 On the day when Elkanah sacrificed, he would give portions to Peninnah his wife and to all her sons and daughters. 5 But to Hannah he gave a double portion, because he loved her, though the LORD had closed her womb. 6 And her rival used to provoke her grievously to irritate her, because the LORD had closed her womb. 7 So it went on year by year. As often as she went up to the house of the LORD, she was broken-hearted and wept and did not eat. 8 And Elkanah, her husband, said to her, “Hannah, why do you weep? And why do you not eat? And why is your heart sad? Am I not more to you than ten sons?”

9 After they had eaten and drunk in Shiloh, Hannah rose. Now Eli the priest was sitting on the seat beside the doorpost of the temple of the LORD. 10 She was deeply distressed and prayed to the LORD and wept bitterly. 11 And she vowed a vow and said, “O LORD of hosts, if you will indeed look on the lowly state of your servant and remember me and not forget your servant, but will give to your servant a son, then I will give him to the LORD all the days of his life, and no razor shall touch his head.”

12 As she continued praying before the LORD, Eli observed her mouth. 13 Hannah was speaking in her heart; only her lips moved, and her voice was not heard. Therefore Eli took her to be a drunken woman. 14 And Eli said to her, “How long will you go on being drunk? Put your wine away from you.” 15 But Hannah answered, “No, my lord, I am a woman for whom this day is difficult. I have drunk neither wine nor strong drink, but I have been pouring out my soul before the LORD. 16 Do not regard your servant as a worthless woman, for all along I have been speaking out of my great anxiety and vexation.” 17 Then Eli answered, “Go in peace, and the God of Israel grant your petition that you have made to him.” 18 And she said, “Let your servant find favor in your eyes.” Then the woman went her way and ate, and her face was no longer sad.

19 Early the next morning they arose and worshiped before the LORD and then went back to their home at Ramah. Elkanah made love to his wife Hannah, and the LORD remembered her. 20 And in due time Hannah conceived and bore a son, and she called his name Samuel, for she said, “I have asked for him from the LORD.”

21 The man Elkanah and all his house went up to offer to the LORD the yearly sacrifice and to pay his vow. 22 But Hannah did not go up, for she said to her husband, “As soon as the child is weaned, I will bring him, so that he may appear in the presence of the LORD and dwell there forever.” 23 Elkanah her husband said to her, “Do what seems best to you; wait until you have weaned him; only, may the LORD establish his word.” So the woman remained and nursed her son until she weaned him. 24 And when she had weaned him, she took him up with her, along with a three-year-old bull, an ephah of flour, and a skin of wine, and she brought him to the house of the LORD at Shiloh. And the child was young. 25 Then they slaughtered the bull, and they brought the child to Eli. 26 And she said, “Oh, my lord! As you live, my lord, I am the woman who was standing here in your presence, praying to the LORD. 27 For this child I prayed, and the LORD has granted me my petition that I made to him. 28 Therefore I have lent him to the LORD. As long as he lives, he is lent to the LORD.”

And he worshiped the LORD there.

“Hannah II” 
By James Martin
(source)

Midday Lesson

Hannah’s sorrow, God’s mercy

The book of 1 Samuel Begins in the days when the judges still ruled Israel. Samuel was Israel’s last judge and the first priest and prophet to serve during the time of a king. He was the best example of what a good judge should be, governing the people by God’s Word and not by his own impulses. Samuel was the man who anointed Saul as Israel’s first king.” [11]

Elkanah means “God created” and Hannah means “graciousness.” 

“Although many great Old Testament leaders (such as Abraham, Jacob, and David) had more than one wife, this was not God’s original intention for marriage. Genesis 2:24 states that in marriage, two people become one flesh. Why then polygamy exist among God’s people? First, it was to produce more offspring to help in a man’s work and to assure the continuation of a man’s family line. Numerous children were a symbol of status and wealth. Second, in societies where many young men were killed in battle, polygamy became an accepted way of supporting women who otherwise would have remained unmarried and, very likely, destitute. Nevertheless, polygamy often caused serious family problems, as we see in the story of Hannah and Peninnah.” [12]

“Since the time of Joshua, Shiloh had been the political and religious center for the people of Israel [see Joshua 18:1]. The tabernacle and the Ark of the Covenant were kept there until David conquered Jerusalem, making that city the new place of Israel’s worship.” [13]

“Three times a year, all Israeli men were required to attend a religious feast held at the tabernacle: the Passover with the Festival of Unleavened Bread, the Festival of Harvest, and the Festival of [Tabernacles] (Deut 16:16). Elkanah made this pilgrimage  regularly to fulfill God’s commands. (See Exod 23:14-17 for the regulations concerning the pilgrimage..)” [14]

“Hannah had been unable to conceive children, and in the Old Testament times, a childless woman was considered a failure. Her barrenness was a social embarrassment for her husband. [People thought it was a sign that God had withdrawn His blessing.] Children were a very important part of the society’s economic structure. They were a source of labor for the family and it was their duty to care for their parents in their old age. If a wife could not bear children, she was obligated by ancient Middle Eastern custom to give one of her servant girls to her husband to bear children for her. Although Elkanah could have left Hannah (a husband was permitted to divorce a barren wife), he remained lovingly devoted to her despite social criticism and his rights under civil law.” [15]

“Hannah had few resources, no agency, diminished status. She lived in a time of great distress for God’s people… The world, Hannah’s world, was hopeless on every level. She could not bear children, bringing sorrow on her and her husband. There was no good leadership at any level in her country. God’s people were compromised and drifting from the truth.” [16]

Verse seven says, “So it went on year by year. As often as she went up to the house of the LORD, she was broken-hearted and wept and did not eat.” “Rather than containing her grief over her barrenness, Hannah expresse[d] her heart to the Lord through fasting and tears.” [48]

Do you know a “Hannah”? Think of those in your own life who, like Hannah, are struggling with involuntary childlessness or unanswered prayers. “Being involuntarily childless is a life-changing process that can happen gradually or suddenly. Regardless, it can involve a shock to [a woman’s] system, an unexpected (and often desperately unwanted) change in [her] self-concept and life narrative, and loss and grief that are beyond what words can express. On top of that, [she] can feel vulnerable to others’ negative biases, assumptions, and stereotypes—and to others’ well-meaning but unwittingly painful comments and suggestions.” [17] Be a support to those around you who are suffering.

Furthering Hannah’s pain were the cruel jeers from Peninnah, whose words eroded Hannah’s self-confidence. 

After the sacrificial meal at Shiloh, “Hannah mingled tears with her prayers; she considered the mercy of our God, who knows the troubled soul. God gives us leave, in prayer, not only to ask good things in general, but to mention that special good thing we most need and desire.” [18]


As verse 10 records, “She was deeply distressed and prayed to the LORD and wept bitterly.” Hannah had good reason to be discouraged and embittered: she was barren, she had to share her husband with another woman (and even worse, a woman who disdained and ridiculed her), she was frowned upon by society, and to top it all off, her priest – who should have been a source of compassionate support and comfort – accused her of being drunk as she silently prayed to the Lord. Yet, Hannah responded to the accusation with sincerity and grace.

“It ill becomes us to be rash and hasty in censures of others, and to think people guilty of bad things while the matter is doubtful and unproved. Hannah did not retort the charge, and upbraid Eli with the wicked conduct of his own sons. When we are at any time unjustly censured, we have need to set a double watch before the door of our lips, that we do not return censure for censure. Hannah thought it enough to clear herself, and so must we. Eli was willing to acknowledge his mistake. Hannah went away with satisfaction of mind.” [19]

Have you ever accused someone without proof, in haste? If so, acknowledge your mistake and make amends. Don’t allow your own pride to keep you from redressing the pain you caused another.

“Rejoice!” 
(source)

“Samuel means ‘the name is God (godly)’ or ‘the descendant of God,’ a name suggesting he was a child given from God.” [20]

“Hannah is a type of Mary as Samuel is a type of Christ, because as St Cyprian state[d], ‘Samuel [was born] not according to the order of generation, but according to the mercy and promise of God.’” [21]

“The Lord show[ed] His mercy to Hannah and demonstrate[d] that His power is stronger than human weakness by giving Hannah a son. Samuel, dedicated to God even before conception, [was] a living sign of God’s grace. Peninnah’s self-righteous provocation for Hannah is a warning to us never to judge those who suffer deprivation of any sort, or to assume that God judges us favorably in relation to those who suffer. Hannah’s trusting openness to God’s Word, and the blessing she received, encourages us to trust that God will deal with us according to His compassionate love in Jesus Christ.” [22]

Lord God, hear all those who cry to You in their affliction, and remember Your promise to save those who call on Your name. Amen.

[23]

In verse 28, Hannah said, “Therefore I have lent him to the LORD. As long as he lives, he is lent to the LORD.” Here, we see that “Hannah [was] not only fulfilling her promise [to God], but her words are [also] prophetic of Samuel’s life of service to God.” [24]

“Hannah [brought] the young Samuel to the presence of the Lord at Shiloh, and she offer[ed] a sacrifice of thanksgiving and consecration. In fulfillment of her vow, Hannah [gave] Samuel to the Lord for the length of his life. Everything that we have is a gift from the Lord… God’s claim on our life is absolute (Lk 14:25-33). Always true to His Word, He will stand by His promises to us, even when we have no earthly reason for hope.” [25]

Thank you, Lord, for all Your gifts to us. Let our joy be complete as we offer ourselves and our children to You and to each other in love. Amen.

[26]
Samuel Dedicated by Hannah at the Temple 
by Frank W.W. Topham 
(source)

Antiphon 

Behold, the Desire of all nations shall come: and the house of the Lord shall be filled with glory. Alleluia! 

The crooked shall be made straight, and the rough places plain: come, O Lord, and tarry not. Alleluia! [27]

Midday Prayers

Prayers for those hoping to conceive or adopt a child:

Heavenly Father,

You know my deep desire for a child

A little one to love and to hold, to care for,

to cherish. Grant that my body may conceive

and give birth to a beautiful, healthy baby in

Your holy image. 

Guide me in all my choices so that this

conception, my pregnancy and my baby’s birth

are in line with Your will.

Heavenly Father and Holy Mother,

hear this prayer of my heart, mind and spirit.

Amen. [28]

Dear Jesus,

I have asked you for many favors,

but I beg for this one.

Take it, place it in your heart,

and when the Eternal Father sees it

covered with the mantle of thy most Precious Blood,

He cannot refuse it.

For then it is Your prayer not mine. 

Amen [29]

God our Creator,

by your love the world is filled with life,

through your generosity one generation

gives life to another,

and so are your wonders told and your praises sung.

We look to you in our love and in our need:

may it be your will that we bear (adopt) a child

to share our home and faith.

Loving God, be close to us

as we pray to love and do your will.

You are our God, nourishing us forever and ever. Amen. [30]


O God, make speed to save us.
O Lord, make haste to help us.

The Invitatory

Our King and Savior now draws near: 

The glory of the Lord shall be revealed, and all flesh shall see it together. 

Our King and Savior now draws near: O Come, let us adore him.

🕇 Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit: 

as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Alleluia!

December 22nd Great Antiphon

Evening Reading: Hebrews 9:1-14

Christ comes as high priest

1 Now even the first covenant had regulations for worship and an earthly place of holiness. 2 For a tent was prepared, the first section, in which were the lampstand and the table and the bread of the Presence. It is called the Holy Place. 3 Behind the second curtain was a second section called the Most Holy Place, 4 having the golden altar of incense and the ark of the covenant covered on all sides with gold, in which was a golden urn holding the manna, and Aaron’s staff that budded, and the tablets of the covenant. 5 Above it were the cherubim of glory overshadowing the mercy seat. Of these things we cannot now speak in detail.

6 These preparations having thus been made, the priests go regularly into the first section, performing their ritual duties, 7 but into the second only the high priest goes, and he but once a year, and not without taking blood, which he offers for himself and for the unintentional sins of the people. 8 By this the Holy Spirit indicates that the way into the holy places is not yet opened as long as the first section is still standing 9 (which is symbolic for the present age). According to this arrangement, gifts and sacrifices are offered that cannot perfect the conscience of the worshiper, 10 but deal only with food and drink and various washings, regulations for the body imposed until the time of reformation.11 But when Christ appeared as a high priest of the good things that have come, then through the greater and more perfect tent (not made with hands, that is, not of this creation) 12 he entered once for all into the holy places, not by means of the blood of goats and calves but by means of his own blood, thus securing an eternal redemption. 13 For if the blood of goats and bulls, and the sprinkling of defiled persons with the ashes of a heifer, sanctify for the purification of the flesh, 14 how much more will the blood of Christ, who through the eternal Spirit offered himself without blemish to God, purify our conscience from dead works to serve the living God.

“Christ the High Priest” 
(source)

Evening Lesson 

Jesus’s Eternal Priesthood and Sacrifice

“The long middle section of the sermon (Hebrews) argues for the superiority of Jesus’s priesthood. It begins with an extended exhortation (5:11–6:20), and then focuses on Jesus’s priestly identity and activity (7–10).” [32] Today’s reading comes from this section.

“Hebrews presupposes the readers’ grasp of the “basic teaching about Christ” (6:1), but, in a rebuke as much as an exhortation, [Hebrews] urges them to move beyond the milk that is fit for babes to the meat that is meant for the mature (compare Paul’s use of this imagery in 1 Cor 3:1–3). This ‘mature teaching’ is by no means a matter of moving beyond Jesus or abandoning Jesus. Such apostasy from Christ, Hebrews calls ‘recrucifying the Son of God’ (6:6). Indeed, God’s promise based on Jesus’s resurrection is utterly reliable; Jesus is the ‘anchor of the soul’ (6:19), to whose priesthood God has bound Himself by oath (6:13). The nature and implications of Jesus’s priesthood, however, are precisely what require explication. By it the Christian hope is made secure. By it Christians are able to become ‘imitators of those who, through faith and patience, are inheriting the promises’ (6:12).” [33]

“The consideration of Jesus as priest is the climax of Hebrews’ ‘lesser to the greater’ argument. But because the procedures and symbols of the ancient Jewish [faith and practice] are foreign to us today, this section makes for some of the hardest reading in the New Testament. It is important to remember from the start that Hebrews’ argument is based on the Christian experience of the Holy Spirit and the conviction that Jesus is Risen Lord, and he has entered definitively into the life of God (2:3–4). Only this premise makes Hebrews’ reinterpretation of Scripture reasonable. Once that premise is granted, however, then the major turning points of the exposition make sense.” [34]

The Earthly Holy Place and the Most Holy Place

Hebrews 9:1-7 is a “description of the Mosaic tabernacle, which prefigures the heavenly altar. This passage is read during… Advent to describe the mystery of the Incarnation of the Son of God. Mary’s womb was prepared to be Christ’s tabernacle, the very dwelling place of God.” [35]

Additionally, the “Holy Place of the tabernacle was a picture of the old covenant and the old sacrificial system… [while] the Most Holy Place was a picture of heaven and of Christ’s new covenant. OT services, therefore, pointed ahead to Christ, while NT services celebrate His work, distribute His benefits, and anticipate His return. Christ is the true Priest who sacrificed Himself to reconcile us to the Father.” [36]

O Lord, send us your Holy Spirit and increase reverence in us toward Your Word and service. Amen.

[37]

“A most important point in Hebrews is the inner veil, the second veil. It separates the holy place (v. 2, the sanctuary) from the most holy place (v. 3, the Holiest of All), which contains the ark of the covenant and into which only the high priest [could] enter and only once a year. The inner veil forms the locus of the liturgical practice of the old covenant (vv. 6-10) and reveals its imperfection. The people could not draw near to God (see especially v. 8). At His death, Christ solved this alienation (Mt 27:51).” [38]

“The ark of the covenant [v. 4] contained the relics, as it were, of Israel: the pot of manna, Aaron’s rod, and the tablets of the Law.” [39]

Verse 5 says that above the ark of the covenant were “were the cherubim of glory overshadowing the mercy seat. Of these things we cannot now speak in detail.” “God is enthroned upon the cherubim; hence, God’s throne in Israel’s midst, the mercy seat, [had] a cherub on each side… These representations, along with the pictures of cherubim on the inner veil (Ex 26:31) and the beauty and detailed workmanship of everything made for the tabernacle, serve as the icons of the OT. This, and numerous other passages, put to rest the fear that the Second Commandment (Ex 20:4-6) prohibits all imagery. God [the Father] cannot be represented because divine nature is unknowable and hence cannot be depicted. However, when the Son [became] Man, the human nature of God the Son can be, and is, imaged.” [40]

“While priests entered the holy place daily, only the high priest could enter the most holy place and only once a year, on the Day of the Atonement (Yom Kippur). He entered with the animal blood of the atonement sacrifice, which was offered first for his own sins and then for the sins of the people. This annual sacrifice reveals the imperfect, temporary status of the old covenant, for (1) only one man can enter God’s presence; (2) that man cannot enter continually; (3) he must enter occasionally to repeat the sacrifice for sins; (4) this sacrifice deals entirely with materials from this age, which are imperfect and impermanent – it cannot begin a participation in the age to come (v. 10, the time of reformation); (5) it deals mainly with the outer man – it is superficial and cannot purify man’s heart and mind, let alone restore fallen human nature.” [41]

Redemption Through the Blood of Christ

Verses 11-14 contrasts Christ with the Old Testament high priest. Christ “is high priest of the new covenant.. He enters the heavenly sanctuary once for all (v. 12) – Christ’s one sacrifice covers all sins for all time – with the blood of Christ (v. 14), His own human blood, which heals our corrupt humanity (v. 13, the flesh), restores us to our proper relationship to God, pur (v. 14, cleanse your conscience) and holy, and draws us near to God in liturgical worship (v. 14, serve the living God). Dead works (see 6:1) are human activity in and of this age, participating in mortality and corruption (and normally even in sin). Liturgically, dead works are the actions of old covenant worship.” [42]

How much more will the blood of Christ, who through the eternal Spirit, purify our conscience from dead works to serve the living God? “Infinitely more, because Christ is not only man, but is also the infinite God.” [43]

Lord Jesus, by Your blood there is forgiveness of sins. Continue to purify me that I might honor You. Amen.

[44]

Antiphon 

The Lord saith, repent ye: for the kingdom of heaven is at hand.

Alleluia!

[45]

Vespers Prayer 

O Lord, raise up, we pray Thee, Thy power, and come among us, and with great might succour us: that whereas, through our sins and wickedness, we are sore let and hindered in running the race set before us, Thy bountiful grace and mercy may speedily help and deliver us; Who lives. Amen. [46]

The Small Verse  

Rejoice in the Lord always. I will say it again: Rejoice! Let your gentleness be evident to all. The Lord is near.

(Phil 4:4-5)

The Concluding Prayers of the Church

Our Father, the day is over and I turn to you before I take my rest. You have been with me all the day long, and for all your mercies, perceived and unperceived, I give thanks. Of all that has been amiss in me, in thought, word, and deed, I repent, and ask your gracious forgiveness as I also forgive all who have offended me. Grant me now the blessings of a quiet mind and a trustful spirit, the freedom from fear of a child in its father’s house. So let me rest in you, at peace with you and with all people. Amen. [47]


Devotionals compile & written by S.P. Rogers

Citations:

[1] Episcopal Church. (1979). Collects: Seasons of the Year. In The Book of common prayer: And administration of the sacraments, and other rites and ceremonies of the church, according to the use of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States of America: Together with the psalter, or, Psalms of David (pp. 212). New York, NY: Church Publishing Incorporated.

[2] Laurenti, L. (n.d.). The Hymnal 1982: According to the use of the Episcopal Church 68. Rejoice! rejoice, believers. Retrieved December 10, 2020, from https://hymnary.org/hymn/EH1982/68

[3] Episcopal Church. (1911). Proper of Seasons. In Breviary offices from Lauds to Compline inclusive: Translated from the Sarum Book and Supplemented from Gallican and Monastic Uses (Ebook ed., Printed For The Society Of S. Margaret, Boston, U.S., pp.111). New York, NY: J. Pott &.

[4] Episcopal Church. (1979). Daily Office: Daily Evening Prayer: Rite Two. In The Book of common prayer: And administration of the sacraments, and other rites and ceremonies of the church, according to the use of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States of America: Together with the psalter, or, Psalms of David (pp. 119). New York, NY: Church Publishing Incorporated.

[5] Armentrout, D. S., & Slocum, R. B. (2017, September 11). Magnificat. Retrieved December 10, 2020, from https://episcopalchurch.org/library/glossary/magnificat

[6] Ibid. 5

[7] Ibid. 5

[8] Episcopal Church. (1911). Proper of Seasons. In Breviary offices from Lauds to Compline inclusive: Translated from the Sarum Book and Supplemented from Gallican and Monastic Uses (Ebook ed., Printed For The Society Of S. Margaret, Boston, U.S., pp.111-112). New York, NY: J. Pott &.

[9] Forward Movement. (2013). Prayers for Special Occasions. In Prayers for All Occasions (Kindle ed., pp. 714). Cincinnati, OH: Forward Movement.

[10] Episcopal Church. (1911). Proper of Seasons. In Breviary offices from Lauds to Compline inclusive: Translated from the Sarum Book and Supplemented from Gallican and Monastic Uses (Ebook ed., Printed For The Society Of S. Margaret, Boston, U.S., pp.112). New York, NY: J. Pott &.

[11] Tyndale House Publishers. (2012). 1 Samuel. In Chronological life application study Bible (p. 416). Carol Stream, IL: Tyndale House Pub.

[12] Ibid. 11

[13] Academic Community of St. Athanasius Academy of Orthodox Theology (2008). 1 Kingdoms. In The Orthodox study Bible (p. 383). Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson.

[14] Tyndale House Publishers. (2012). 1 Samuel. In Chronological life application study Bible (p. 416). Carol Stream, IL: Tyndale House Pub.

[15] Ibid. 14

[16] Darling, D. (2020, October 22). Hannah’s Prayer for 2016. Retrieved December 10, 2020, from https://danieldarling.com/2016/07/praying-hannahs-prayer-in-2016/

[17] Baliotis, V. (2019). Involuntary Childlessness. Retrieved December 10, 2020, from https://www.drvula.com/services/involuntary-childlessness/

[18] Henry, M. (n.d.). Matthew Henry’s Commentary: 1 Samuel 1. Retrieved December 10, 2020, from https://biblehub.com/commentaries/mhc/1_samuel/1.htm

[19] Ibid. 18

[20] Academic Community of St. Athanasius Academy of Orthodox Theology (2008). 1 Kingdoms. In The Orthodox study Bible (p. 383). Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson.

[21] Ibid. 20

[22] House, C. P. (2009). 1 Samuel. In HOLY BIBLE: The lutheran study bible (p. 436). St. Louis, MO: Concordia Publishing HSE.

[23] Ibid. 22

[24] Academic Community of St. Athanasius Academy of Orthodox Theology (2008). 1 Kingdoms. In The Orthodox study Bible (p. 383). Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson.

[25] House, C. P. (2009). 1 Samuel. In HOLY BIBLE: The lutheran study bible (p. 436). St. Louis, MO: Concordia Publishing HSE.

[26] Ibid. 25

[27] Episcopal Church. (1911). Proper of Seasons. In Breviary offices from Lauds to Compline inclusive: Translated from the Sarum Book and Supplemented from Gallican and Monastic Uses (Ebook ed., Printed For The Society Of S. Margaret, Boston, U.S., pp.112). New York, NY: J. Pott &.

[28] Catholic Infertility Ministry. (2015). Prayers. Retrieved December 12, 2020, from https://www.catholicinfertilityministry.com/prayers.html

[29] Ibid. 28

[30] USCCB.org. (2020). Prayer for Those Hoping to Conceive or Adopt a Child. Retrieved December 12, 2020, from https://www.usccb.org/prayer-and-worship/prayers-and-devotions/prayers/prayer-for-those-hoping-to-conceive-or-adopt-a-child

[31] Episcopal Church. (1911). Proper of Seasons. In Breviary offices from Lauds to Compline inclusive: Translated from the Sarum Book and Supplemented from Gallican and Monastic Uses (Ebook ed., Printed For The Society Of S. Margaret, Boston, U.S., pp.110). New York, NY: J. Pott &.

[32] Senior, D., Collins, J. J., & Getty-Sullivan, M. A. (2016). Hebrews. In The Catholic study Bible: The New American Bible, revised edition, translated from the original languages with critical use of all the ancient sources (Third ed., p. 1065). Oxford: Oxford University Press.

[33] Ibid. 32

[34] Ibid. 32

[35] Academic Community of St. Athanasius Academy of Orthodox Theology (2008). Hebrews. In The Orthodox study Bible (p. 1693). Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson.

[36] House, C. P. (2009). Hebrews. In HOLY BIBLE: The lutheran study bible (p. 2116). St. Louis, MO: Concordia Publishing HSE.

[37] Ibid. 36

[38] Academic Community of St. Athanasius Academy of Orthodox Theology (2008). Hebrews. In The Orthodox study Bible (p. 1693-1694). Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson.

[39] Ibid. 38, P. 1694

[40] Ibid. 38, P. 1694

[41] Ibid. 38, P. 1694

[42] Ibid. 38, P. 1694-1695

[43] House, C. P. (2009). Hebrews. In HOLY BIBLE: The lutheran study bible (p. 2116). St. Louis, MO: Concordia Publishing HSE.

[44] Ibid. 43, P. 2118

[45] Episcopal Church. (1911). Proper of Seasons. In Breviary offices from Lauds to Compline inclusive: Translated from the Sarum Book and Supplemented from Gallican and Monastic Uses (Ebook ed., Printed For The Society Of S. Margaret, Boston, U.S., pp.113). New York, NY: J. Pott &.

[46] Episcopal Church. (1911). Proper of Seasons. In Breviary offices from Lauds to Compline inclusive: Translated from the Sarum Book and Supplemented from Gallican and Monastic Uses (Ebook ed., Printed For The Society Of S. Margaret, Boston, U.S., pp.112). New York, NY: J. Pott &.

[47] Forward Movement. (2013). Daily Prayers. In Prayers for All Occasions (Kindle ed., pp. 162). Cincinnati, OH: Forward Movement.


[48] Academic Community of St. Athanasius Academy of Orthodox Theology (2008). 1 Kingdoms. In The Orthodox study Bible (p. 383). Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson.

[49] The Episcopal Church. (2018). Seasonal Blessings. In The Book of Occasional Services (PDF ed., p. 8). Then Episcopal Church. Retrieved November December 15, 2020, from https://episcopalchurch.org/files/lm_book_of_occasional_services_2018.pdf

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