December 19 Devotional (2020)

Ember Saturday, December 19, 2020
Third Week of Advent

Today’s Readings: Judges 13:1-25; John 4:40-52; Embertide Acclamations


O God, make speed to save us.
O Lord, make haste to help us.

The Invitatory

Our King and Savior now draws near: 

Come, let us adore him.

Glorify the Lord, you angels and all powers of the Lord, *

    O heavens and all waters above the heavens.

Sun and moon and stars of the sky, glorify the Lord, *

    praise him and highly exalt him for ever. [1]

🕇 Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit: as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Alleluia!

Opening Prayer

O God, the source of eternal light: Shed forth your unending day upon all of us who watch for you, that our lips may praise you, our lives may bless you, and our worship may give you glory; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.†

The Hymn

“There’s a voice in the wilderness crying” 

1 There’s a voice in the wilderness crying,

a call from the ways untrod:

Prepare in the desert a highway,

a highway for our God!

The valleys shall be exalted,

the lofty hills brought low;

make straight all the crooked places,

where the Lord our God may go!

2 O Zion, that bringest good tidings,

get thee up to the heights and sing!

Proclaim to a desolate people

the coming of their King.

Like the flowers of the field they perish,

like grass our works decay,

the power and pomp of nations

shall pass like a dream away;

3 but the word of our God endureth,

the arm of the Lord is strong;

he stands in the midst of nations,

and he will right the wrong.

He shall feed His flock like a shepherd,

the lambs he’ll gently hold;

to pastures of peace he’ll lead them,

and bring them safe to his fold. [2]

Antiphon 

Every valley shall be exalted, and every mountain and hill shall be made low:

And all flesh shall see the salvation of God.

Manoah and his barren wife sacrifice a ram to the angel of the Lord (above); 
Manoah’s wife wears a wimple in Eustache Le Sueur‘s The Sacrifice of Manoah, 1640-1650. 
(source)

Morning Reading: Judges 13:1-25

The birth of Samson

1 And the people of Israel again did what was evil in the sight of the LORD, so the LORD gave them into the hand of the Philistines for forty years.

2 There was a certain man of Zorah, of the tribe of the Danites, whose name was Manoah. And his wife was barren and had no children. 3 And the angel of the LORD appeared to the woman and said to her, “Behold, you are barren and have not borne children, but you shall conceive and bear a son. 4 Therefore be careful and drink no wine or strong drink, and eat nothing unclean, 5 for behold, you shall conceive and bear a son. No razor shall come upon his head, for the child shall be a Nazirite to God from the womb, and he shall begin to save Israel from the hand of the Philistines.” 6 Then the woman came and told her husband, “A man of God came to me, and his appearance was like the appearance of the angel of God, very awesome. I did not ask him where he was from, and he did not tell me his name, 7 but he said to me, ‘Behold, you shall conceive and bear a son. So then drink no wine or strong drink, and eat nothing unclean, for the child shall be a Nazirite to God from the womb to the day of his death.’”

8Then Manoah prayed to the LORD and said, “O Lord, please let the man of God whom you sent come again to us and teach us what we are to do with the child who will be born.” 9 And God listened to the voice of Manoah, and the angel of God came again to the woman as she sat in the field. But Manoah her husband was not with her. 10 So the woman ran quickly and told her husband, “Behold, the man who came to me the other day has appeared to me.” 11 And Manoah arose and went after his wife and came to the man and said to him, “Are you the man who spoke to this woman?” And he said, “I am.” 12 And Manoah said, “Now when your words come true, what is to be the child’s manner of life, and what is his mission?” 13 And the angel of the LORD said to Manoah, “Of all that I said to the woman let her be careful. 14 She may not eat of anything that comes from the vine, neither let her drink wine or strong drink, or eat any unclean thing. All that I commanded her let her observe.”

15 Manoah said to the angel of the LORD, “Please let us detain you and prepare a young goat for you.” 16 And the angel of the LORD said to Manoah, “If you detain me, I will not eat of your food. But if you prepare a burnt offering, then offer it to the LORD.” (For Manoah did not know that he was the angel of the LORD.) 17 And Manoah said to the angel of the LORD, “What is your name, so that, when your words come true, we may honor you?” 18 And the angel of the LORD said to him, “Why do you ask my name, seeing it is wonderful?” 19 So Manoah took the young goat with the grain offering, and offered it on the rock to the LORD, to the one who works wonders, and Manoah and his wife were watching. 20 And when the flame went up toward heaven from the altar, the angel of the LORD went up in the flame of the altar. Now Manoah and his wife were watching, and they fell on their faces to the ground.

21 The angel of the LORD appeared no more to Manoah and to his wife. Then Manoah knew that he was the angel of the LORD. 22 And Manoah said to his wife, “We shall surely die, for we have seen God.” 23 But his wife said to him, “If the LORD had meant to kill us, he would not have accepted a burnt offering and a grain offering at our hands, or shown us all these things, or now announced to us such things as these.” 24 And the woman bore a son and called his name Samson. And the young man grew, and the LORD blessed him. 25 And the Spirit of the LORD began to stir him in Mahaneh-dan, between Zorah and Eshtaol.

Morning Lesson

The Angel of the Lord prophesies Samson’s birth

About the Book of Judges:

The Book of Judges is traditionally believed that have been written by Samuel during his early ministry. “Judges (meaning ‘rulers’) was written three centuries after the entry of the tribes of Israel into Canaan inder Joshua, and covers the events of those centuries… This time coincides with the Iron Age in the Middle East. The Israelites began their apostasy after the death of Joshua. They did not drive out the Canaanites as God had commanded then to do through Moses. Instead, they intermarried with their pagan neighbors and began worshipping Baal.” [4]

The major theme of the books is “God’s continual deliverance of a people that had forgotten Him and the Law. The book begins with compromise and ends in anarchy. It is a record of Israel’s forsaking God and of His forsaking Israel because of their disobedience.” [5]

“The book is named for the thirteen judges [rulers] of Israel: twelve raised up by God, one a usurper. The judges were to bring deliverance, protection, and military leadership; to settle differences, judge lawsuits, and administer justice. Israel was a theocracy; the judges were not kings, but deputies of God sent to save the people from seven different apostasies. The office was not continual; rather judges were raised up as oppressive circumstances required.” [6]

“The book of Judges is the second book in the collection the early rabbis called the ‘Former Prophets’ and modern interpreters [call] the ‘Deuteronomistic History of Israel.’ The author of the Deuteronomistic History created the period of the judges by organizing a collection of hero stories into a chronological framework. These were stories about several local Israelite leaders whose military achievements served to maintain Israelite presence in Canaan in the face of serious threats to their existence from various rivals for control of the region before the rise of the Israelite monarchy, which was a little known period of Israelite history. The name of the book comes from the title given to its protagonists in 2:16. The “judges” did not preside over courts of law but were charismatic leaders of the individual tribes or groups of several tribes. No judge was ever able to unite all the tribes to face those peoples who vied with Israel for control of Canaan’s limited resources. The judges had to deal with two problems: the failure of Israel to serve the Lord alone and the competition for control of the land from other peoples. The book presents these two problems as interrelated. When Israel failed to maintain its commitment to serve the Lord exclusively, then God allowed Israel’s neighbors to make its life very difficult (2:11–14).” [7]

“There was always competition for control over the land of Canaan. In the course of that competition, individuals emerged who proved very capable of managing that competition to the benefit of the Israelite tribes. Stories about these individuals and their feats circulated among the Israelite tribes and eventually found their way into the collection we know as the book of Judges. This collection, however, served a purpose beyond simply preserving the memory of ancient heroes. Its purpose was to illustrate the consequences of Israel’s failure to live in faithful obedience to the Lord. It deals with a practical and theological problem: the absence of the kind of leadership provided by Joshua and the elders who outlived him (2:7). How should Israel be governed? Who will insure that Israel will live according to the Torah in the land it had received from the Lord?” [8]

“The book of Judges has three parts. The first (1:1–3:6) provides readers with a framework for understanding the significance of the stories about these ancient heroes. The second part (3:7–16:31) rehearses the exploits of the judges. The book concludes with a few supplementary stories (17–18) that show how the Israelite tribes were on a path of self-destruction, along with stories concerning an intertribal war directed against the tribe of Benjamin (19–21). Originally the stories about the individual judges served to excite a certain measure of pride in the achievements of the tribes in maintaining control over the land of Canaan. But once these stories were put into their present context in the book of Judges, the effect was to show that there was something terribly wrong about the way the Israelite tribes were living their lives in the land that God had given them. Readers are led to conclude that matters cannot go on like this—something must be done because the life of the Israelite tribes is degenerating into anarchy.” [9]

On today’s reading:

“Despite God’s continued faithfulness, the sons of Israel still apostatize[d], a pattern repeated throughout of Book of Judges.” [10]

“After forty years of bondage for Israel, God made known His plans through His Angel to deliver Israel by means of a special son born to a barren woman – as also happened with Sarah (Gn 16:1), Rebekah (Gn 25:21), Hannah (1 Sam 1:2-28), and Elizabeth (Lk 1:7).” [11]

“Nazirite is derived from the Hebrew nazir, ‘consecrated,’ ‘dedicated.’ The one making a Nazirite vow (see Nm 6:2; Am 2:11, 12; 1Sam 1:11; Lk 1:15) refrains from strong drink, eating unclean things, and cutting the hair.” [12]

“Samson was a Nazirite unto God from the womb, as were the prophet Samuel (1Sam 1:11) and John the Baptist (Lk 1:15). Samson would begin to deliver Israel from the Philistines, a work carried further by Samuel, Saul, and King David.” [13]

“Not only does the Angel of the Lord prophesy Samson’s birth and calling, but the Spirit of the Lord attends his life.” [14]

Antiphon 

‘I set no store by life:

I only want to finish the race and complete the task

that the Lord has assigned to me,

of bearing witness to the gospel of God’s grace.’

Let us confess our failure to live up to our calling. (continued below)

Morning Prayer

Embertide Confession

Lord Jesus, you said to your disciples: ‘You have not chosen me, but I have chosen you.’

        Lord, have mercy.

        Lord, have mercy.

Lord Jesus, we know that the harvest is plentiful but the labourers are few.

        Christ, have mercy.

        Christ, have mercy.

Lord Jesus, you appointed us to go and bear fruit that will last.

        Lord, have mercy.

        Lord, have mercy. [16]

The Blessing

May Almighty God, by whose providence our Savior Christ came among us in great humility, sanctify us with the light of His blessing and set us free from all sin. Amen. [41]


O God, make speed to save us.
O Lord, make haste to help us.

The Invitatory

Glorify the Lord, O chill and cold, *

    drops of dew and flakes of snow.

Frost and cold, ice and sleet, glorify the Lord, *

    praise him and highly exalt him for ever. [17]

🕇 Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit: as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Alleluia!

Antiphon 

God has called us to follow Christ,

and has formed us into a royal priesthood, a holy nation,

to declare the wonderful deeds of him who has called us

out of darkness into his marvelous light.

Let us confess the times when we have failed to heed this call.

“Young woman praying in church,” 1854 
By Jules Breton 
(source)

Midday Reading

Embertide Acclamations

There are varieties of gifts,

        but the same Spirit.

There are varieties of service,

        but the same Lord.

There are different kinds of working,

        but the same God is at work in all.

There is one body, one Spirit, one hope in God’s call;

        one Lord, one faith, one baptism.

There is one God, Father of all, over all and in all,

        to whom Christ ascended on high.

And through his Spirit he gives us gifts:

        some are apostles, some are his prophets;

evangelists, pastors and teachers he gives us,

        so that we can minister together

to build up his body,

to be mature in the fullness of Christ. [19]

The small verse 

You did not choose me but I chose you. And I appointed you to go and bear fruit, fruit that will last.

(John 15.16)

Midday Prayer 

Embertide Prayer:

Almighty God,

you have entrusted to your Church

a share in the ministry of your Son our great high priest:

inspire by your Holy Spirit the hearts of many

to offer themselves for the ministry of your Church,

that, strengthened by his power,

they may work for the increase of your kingdom

and set forward the eternal praise of your name;

through Jesus Christ your Son our Lord,

who is alive and reigns with you,

in the unity of the Holy Spirit,

one God, now and for ever.

Amen. [20]

Benediction

Go and make disciples of all nations,

baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son

and of the Holy Spirit,

and teaching them to obey everything that I have commanded you. [21]


O God, make speed to save us.
O Lord, make haste to help us.

The Invitatory

Glorify the Lord, O nights and days, *

    O shining light and enfolding dark.

Storm clouds and thunderbolts, glorify the Lord, *

    praise him and highly exalt him for ever. [22]

🕇 Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit: as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Alleluia!

December 19th Great Antiphon 

“Nicodemus Visiting Jesus” 
By Henry Ossawa Tanner (1899) 
(source)

Evening Reading: John 7:40-52

The Messiah, David, and Bethlehem

40 When they heard these words, some of the people said, “This really is the Prophet.” 41 Others said, “This is the Christ.” But some said, “Is the Christ to come from Galilee? 42 Has not the Scripture said that the Christ comes from the offspring of David, and comes from Bethlehem, the village where David was?” 43 So there was a division among the people over him. 44 Some of them wanted to arrest him, but no one laid hands on him.

45 The officers then came to the chief priests and Pharisees, who said to them, “Why did you not bring him?” 46 The officers answered, “No one ever spoke like this man!” 47 The Pharisees answered them, “Have you also been deceived? 48 Have any of the authorities or the Pharisees believed in him? 49 But this crowd that does not know the law is accursed.” 50 Nicodemus, who had gone to him before, and who was one of them, said to them, 51 “Does our law judge a man without first giving him a hearing and learning what he does?” 52 They replied, “Are you from Galilee too? Search and see that no prophet arises from Galilee.”

Evening Lesson

The motive of the hypocritical Pharisees is exposed

About the Gospel of John:

According to tradition, St. John the Apostle wrote this gospel. Because of the profundity of this gospel, John is also referred to as “the Theologian.” It is believed that St. John “was assisted by St. Prochorus in writing this gospel. John, ‘the beloved disciple,’ of Christ (13:23; 21:7, 20), served as the leading authority of Ephesus for most of his ministry and wrote his gospel there. He was almost 100 years old when he died, C AD 96-100… This gospel, written about AD 96, is usually considered the last of the four gospels to be written, supplementing the other three.” [24]

The major theme of the Gospel of John is “the eternal Son of God has come in the flesh. The gospel was written ‘that you may believe that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of God, and that believing you may have life in His name’ (20:31).” [25]

The Gospel of John contains many theological themes, including (1) the Trinity, (2) glory, (3) the spiritual dimension, (4) the sacramental dimension, (5) the Church, (6) the Paschal Theme, and (7) the redemption of the world. [26]

This fourth gospel “has a double conclusion. After the Resurrection stories in Jerusalem, we are told that Jesus did many other signs but that those presented in the gospel are to promote belief in Jesus as Son of God (20:30f). After the Resurrection stories in Galilee, readers learn that the Beloved Disciple, who has since died (21:23), was the source of the Johannine tradition. All the things Jesus did could not be written down (21:24f). Expanded or revised editions of a book were not uncommon in antiquity. Both conclusions remind readers that the Gospel has been written to inspire and confirm their faith in Jesus.” [27]

“The double ending indicates that John’s Gospel went through two editions. Other additions to the narrative and awkward transitions between sections support this conclusion (see introduction to John, NABRE). For example, John 14:31 brings the discourse to an end. Yet the Gospel we possess contains three more chapters of discourse. Further, Jesus is identified with great religious symbols like light, life, water, bread, shepherd, and vine. The Gospel assumes that its readers will recognize that these symbols have roots in the Hebrew Scriptures. This symbolic way of speaking about Jesus probably developed within a community of Christians which included the Beloved Disciple, plus followers who compiled the final edition of the Gospel, and another teacher who wrote the Johannine letters.” [28]

Background:

Our reading begins on the eighth day of the Feast of Tabernacles, “an eight-day autumn harvest festival commemorating the time when Israel wandered in the wilderness of Sinai and the people lived in tents, or tabernacles. Along with Passover and Pentacost, this was one of the three most important festivals of the ancient Jews; it included numerous sacrifices and celebrations (Lv 23:33-43). In later times, the final day of this feast also included drawing water from the pool of Siloam to be mixed with wine and poured at the foot of the altar, both as a purification and in remembrance of the water flowing from the rock that Moses struck (Ex 17:1-7). It further included the lighting of great lamps in the outer court of the temple.” [29] 

It is this ceremony of the drawing of the water which “provides the context for the Lord’s words, ‘If anyone thirsts, let him come to me and drink.’ The living water (v. 38) is the gift of the Holy Spirit (v. 39) and the new life that accompanies this gift… The Prophet (v. 40) refers to the expected Messiah, the Savior Moses foretold would come (Dt 18:15-19).” [30]

On today’s reading:

In verse 40, “the Prophet refers to the expected Messiah, the Savior Moses foretold would come (Dt 18:15-19).” [31]

Bethlehem was the town from which the Christ was expected to come (see Mic 5:2).” [32]

“The chief priests had sent officers of the temple to arrest Jesus in the middle of the Feast (v. 32). By the time the last day had arrived (v. 37), no arrest had been made, because these officers had been converted by the Lord’s teaching. The Pharisees and the scribes who had ‘witnessed the miracles and read the Scriptures derived no benefit’ from either. These officers, on the other hand, even though they could claim none of this learning, were ‘captivated by a single sermon.’ When the mind is open, ‘there is no need for long speeches. Truth is like that’ [St. John Chrysostom].” [33]

“Nicodemus had spoken with Jesus (3:1-21) and had increased in faith. Yet his defense of Christ was still based on our law and was not yet a public profession of faith (see 19:38-39). According to the law, Jesus must be given a hearing before He can be judged (Ex 23:1; Dt 1:15-17).” [34] Nicodemus’s defense prompts the Pharisees to respond, “Aren’t you also from Galilee?… Look into it, and you will see that no prophet comes out of Galilee,” (vs. 52). Here, the “Pharisees show their blind hatred and their ignorance of the Scriptures, for the prophet Jonah came from Galilee, from the town of Gath Hepher, which was only three miles from Nazareth,” (2 Kings 14:25). [35] The Prophet Nahum was also from Galilee (Capernaum, literally meaning “Nahum’s city”).

“With their hypocritical motives being exposed and their prestige slowly eroding, [the Pharisees] began to move to protect themselves. Pride would interfere with their ability to reason, and soon they would become obsessed with getting rid of Jesus just to save face. What was good and right no longer mattered.” [36]

Antiphon 

The Lord shall come with great power:

And all flesh shall see Him, and He will save us.

Vespers Prayer 

Blessed are you, O Lord, the God of our fathers, creator of the changes of day and night, giving rest to the weary, renewing the strength of those who are spent, bestowing upon us occasions of song in the evening. As you have protected us in the day that is past, so be with us in the coming night; keep us from every sin, every evil, and every fear; for you are our light and salvation, and the strength of our life. To you be glory for endless ages. Amen. [38]

The Small Verse

Listen, my God, listen to us; open your eyes and look at our plight and at the city that bears your name. Relying not on your upright deeds but on your great mercy, we pour out our plea to you. Listen, Lord! Forgive, Lord! Hear, Lord, and act! For your own sake, my God do not delay—since your city and your people alike bear your name. 

(Daniel 9:18–19)

The Concluding Prayers of the Church

May the Lord Almighty grant me and those I love a peaceful night and a perfect end. Amen.† [39]


Devotionals compiled/written by S.P. Rogers

Citations:

[1] Episcopal Church. (1979). Daily Office: Daily Morning Prayer: Rite Two. In The Book of common prayer: And administration of the sacraments, and other rites and ceremonies of the church, according to the use of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States of America: Together with the psalter, or, Psalms of David (pp. 80 and 88). New York, NY: Church Publishing Incorporated.

[2] Milligan, J. L. (n.d.). The Hymnal 1982: According to the use of the Episcopal Church 75. There’s a voice in the wilderness crying. Retrieved December 09, 2020, from https://hymnary.org/hymn/EH1982/75

[3] Episcopal Church. (1911). Proper of Seasons. In Breviary offices from Lauds to Compline inclusive: Translated from the Sarum Book and Supplemented from Gallican and Monastic Uses (Ebook ed., Printed For The Society Of S. Margaret, Boston, U.S., pp. 112). New York, NY: J. Pott &.

[4] Academic Community of St. Athanasius Academy of Orthodox Theology (2008). Judges. In The Orthodox study Bible (p. 315). Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson.

[5] Ibid. 4

[6] Ibid. 4

[7] Senior, D., Collins, J. J., & Getty-Sullivan, M. A. (2016). Judges. In The Catholic study Bible: The New American Bible, revised edition, translated from the original languages with critical use of all the ancient sources (Third ed., p. 362). Oxford: Oxford University Press.

[8] Ibid. 7

[9] Ibid. 7

[10] Academic Community of St. Athanasius Academy of Orthodox Theology (2008). Judges. In The Orthodox study Bible (p. 343). Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson.

[11] Ibid. 10

[12] Ibid. 10

[13] Ibid. 10

[14] Ibid. 10

[15] Church of England. (2006). Embertide. Retrieved December 05, 2020, from https://www.churchofengland.org/prayer-and-worship/worship-texts-and-resources/common-worship/churchs-year/times-and-seasons-3

[16] Ibid. 15

[17] Episcopal Church. (1979). Daily Office: Daily Morning Prayer: Rite Two. In The Book of common prayer: And administration of the sacraments, and other rites and ceremonies of the church, according to the use of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States of America: Together with the psalter, or, Psalms of David (pp. 80 and 88). New York, NY: Church Publishing Incorporated.

[18] Church of England. (2006). Embertide. Retrieved December 05, 2020, from https://www.churchofengland.org/prayer-and-worship/worship-texts-and-resources/common-worship/churchs-year/times-and-seasons-3

[19] Ibid. 18

[20] Ibid. 18

[21] Ibid. 18

[22] Episcopal Church. (1979). Daily Office: Daily Morning Prayer: Rite Two. In The Book of common prayer: And administration of the sacraments, and other rites and ceremonies of the church, according to the use of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States of America: Together with the psalter, or, Psalms of David (pp. 80 and 89). New York, NY: Church Publishing Incorporated.

[23] Episcopal Church. (1911). Proper of Seasons. In Breviary offices from Lauds to Compline inclusive: Translated from the Sarum Book and Supplemented from Gallican and Monastic Uses (Ebook ed., Printed For The Society Of S. Margaret, Boston, U.S., pp.109). New York, NY: J. Pott &.

[24] Academic Community of St. Athanasius Academy of Orthodox Theology (2008). John. In The Orthodox study Bible (p. 1427). Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson.

[25] Ibid. 24

[26] Ibid. 24, P. 1427-1428

[27] Senior, D., Collins, J. J., & Getty-Sullivan, M. A. (2016). John. In The Catholic study Bible: The New American Bible, revised edition, translated from the original languages with critical use of all the ancient sources (Third ed., p. 890). Oxford: Oxford University Press.

[28] Ibid. 27

[29] Academic Community of St. Athanasius Academy of Orthodox Theology (2008). John. In The Orthodox study Bible (p. 1467). Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson.

[30] Ibid. 29, P. 1468-1469

[31] Ibid. 29, P. 1469

[32] Ibid. 29, P. 1469

[33] Ibid. 29, P. 1469

[34] Ibid. 29, P. 1469

[35] Ibid. 29, P. 1469

[36] Tyndale House Publishers. (2012). John. In Chronological life application study Bible (p. 1391). Carol Stream, IL: Tyndale House Pub.

[37] Episcopal Church. (1911). Proper of Seasons. In Breviary offices from Lauds to Compline inclusive: Translated from the Sarum Book and Supplemented from Gallican and Monastic Uses (Ebook ed., Printed For The Society Of S. Margaret, Boston, U.S., pp. 112). New York, NY: J. Pott &.

[38] Episcopal Church. (1979). Daily Office: Order for Evening Worship. In The Book of common prayer: And administration of the sacraments, and other rites and ceremonies of the church, according to the use of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States of America: Together with the psalter, or, Psalms of David (pp. 113). New York, NY: Church Publishing Incorporated.

[39] Tickle, P. (2006). Advent Compline. In The divine hours: Prayers for Autumn and Wintertime (Kindle ed., vol. 2, p. 417). New York, NY: Image Books.


[40] Episcopal Church. (1911). Proper of Seasons. In Breviary offices from Lauds to Compline inclusive: Translated from the Sarum Book and Supplemented from Gallican and Monastic Uses (Ebook ed., Printed For The Society Of S. Margaret, Boston, U.S., pp.109). New York, NY: J. Pott &.

[41] The Episcopal Church. (2018). Seasonal Blessings. In The Book of Occasional Services (PDF ed., p. 8). Then Episcopal Church. Retrieved November December 15, 2020, from https://episcopalchurch.org/files/lm_book_of_occasional_services_2018.pdf

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