December 15 Devotional (2020)

December 15, 2020
Third Week of Advent

Today’s Scripture: 2 Kings 2:9-22; Acts 3:12-4:4; Essay: “What is Embertide?”


O God, make speed to save us.
O Lord, make haste to help us.

The Invitatory

The Lord is now near, O come, let us adore Him!

Come let us praise the Lord with joy: let us joyfully sing to God our saviour. Let us come before his presence with thanksgiving; and make a joyful noise to him with psalms. 

🕇 Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit, as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be, world without end. Alleluia! [2]

Opening Prayer

And Ordinary Office morning prayer written by David Lucas (who is blind):

We praise You,  Lord,  because we are ALL fearfully and wonderfully made.

In our Father’s house there is room for all…

There are no able-bodied, there are no disabled:

there are only His beloved children

who are all made in His image.

We are beautiful in His eyes.

We believe Jesus himself ascended into heaven,

carrying his wounds on our behalf.

Jesus does not hide these wounds:

they carry no shame for him but he shows

them to us willingly as proof of his eternal love.

He calls us this morning to do the same,

to stand before him in our brokenness

trusting in him for our care.

I hear footsteps in the garden and I know my Lord is near

and He calls me by name saying

“Why are you hiding from me, why are you hiding from me,

why do you hide from Me when I love you so”?

Those who cannot see, He walks along side as our guide.

He whispers softly to those who cannot hear.

He soothes those whose minds are troubled.

He rides with those who cannot walk.

He sees the pain of those whose pain cannot be seen

and brings insight to those who appear not to understand.

He is at the heart of every lonely room

and is present in every stranger who sits at our hearth.

His love is new every morning.

His love does not depend on our fragile form.

His love is enough for this coming day.

We accept the calling to bring that love to those we meet today:

Lord when I hear you calling help me to say here I am.

Only You can meet the longing of my heart.

Only You know every hidden part.

Show me the gifts I have.

Show me the gift I am.

Let my whole life be lived in love of You

Bringing great joy to Your Heart.

We rejoice in the gift of this new day

The light of your presence O God

Set our hearts on fire with love for you

Now and forever.

Amen. [3]

The Hymn 

by Reginald Heber

Holy, holy, holy! Lord God the Almighty! 

Early in the morning our song shall rise to Thee; 

Holy, holy, holy, merciful and mighty! 

God in three Persons, blessed Trinity! 

Holy, holy, holy! All the saints adore Thee, 

Casting down their golden crowns around the glassy sea; 

Cherubim and seraphim falling down before Thee, 

Who were, and are, and evermore shall be.

Holy, holy, holy! Though the darkness hides Thee, 

Though the eye of sinful man Your glory may not see; 

Only You are holy; there is none beside Thee, 

Perfect in power, in love, and purity. 

Holy, holy, holy! Lord God Almighty! 

All Your works shall praise Your name, in earth, and sky, and sea;

 Holy, holy, holy; merciful and mighty! 

God in three Persons, blessed Trinity! [4]

The Small Verse

Watch, for you know not when the master of the house will come, in the evening, or at midnight, or at cockcrow, or in the morning; lest he come suddenly and find you asleep.

(Mark 13:35, 36)
“The Double Portion” 
(source)

Morning Reading: 2 Kings 2:9-22

Elisha receives Elijah’s spirit

 9 When they had crossed, Elijah said to Elisha, “Ask what I shall do for you, before I am taken from you.” And Elisha said, “Please let there be a double portion of your spirit on me.” 10 And he said, “You have asked a hard thing; yet, if you see me as I am being taken from you, it shall be so for you, but if you do not see me, it shall not be so.” 11 And as they still went on and talked, behold, chariots of fire and horses of fire separated the two of them. And Elijah went up by a whirlwind into heaven. 12 And Elisha saw it and he cried, “My father, my father! The chariots of Israel and its horsemen!” And he saw him no more.

Then he took hold of his own clothes and tore them in two pieces. 13 And he took up the cloak of Elijah that had fallen from him and went back and stood on the bank of the Jordan. 14 Then he took the cloak of Elijah that had fallen from him and struck the water, saying, “Where is the LORD, the God of Elijah?” And when he had struck the water, the water was parted to the one side and to the other, and Elisha went over.

Elisha Succeeds Elijah

15 Now when the sons of the prophets who were at Jericho saw him opposite them, they said, “The spirit of Elijah rests on Elisha.” And they came to meet him and bowed to the ground before him. 16 And they said to him, “Behold now, there are with your servants fifty strong men. Please let them go and seek your master. It may be that the Spirit of the LORD has caught him up and cast him upon some mountain or into some valley.” And he said, “You shall not send.” 17 But when they urged him till he was ashamed, he said, “Send.” They sent therefore fifty men. And for three days they sought him but did not find him. 18 And they came back to him while he was staying at Jericho, and he said to them, “Did I not say to you, ‘Do not go’?”

19 Now the men of the city said to Elisha, “Behold, the situation of this city is pleasant, as my lord sees, but the water is bad, and the land is unfruitful.” 20 He said, “Bring me a new bowl, and put salt in it.” So they brought it to him. 21 Then he went to the spring of water and threw salt in it and said, “Thus says the LORD, I have healed this water; from now on neither death nor miscarriage shall come from it.” 22 So the water has been healed to this day, according to the word that Elisha spoke.

Morning Lesson

The Double Portion

Background

Elisha was a prophet and wonderworker from the Northern Kingdom (Israel). The Lord had called upon Elijah to anoint Elisha to be Elijah’s successor (1 King 19). At the time of Elisha’s anointing, Elijah also accepted Elisha as a son. The time would soon come when the Lord would wisk Elijah away to heaven, leaving the responsibility for the continuation of Elijah’s prophetic duties to Elisha.

In our reading today, the story of Elijah and Elisha picks up just after the prophets had crossed the Jordan River, as described in verse 8: “Elijah took his cloak, rolled it up and struck the water with it. The water divided to the right and to the left, and the two of them crossed over on dry ground.”

On today’s reading:

“Elisha asked to be Elijah’s ‘successor,’ or heir, the one who would continue Elijah’s work as leader of the prophets. That is why he asked for a double share of Elijah’s spirit. Deuteronomy 21:17 helps explain Elisha’s request. According to custom, the firstborn son would receive a double portion of the father’s inheritance. But the decision to grant this request was up to God. Elijah only told Elisha how he would know if his request had been granted.” [5]

“God granted Elisha’s request because Elisha’s motives were pure. His main goal was not to be better or more powerful than Elijah but to accomplish more for God. If our motives our pure, we don’t have to be afraid to ask great things from God, but we must be willing to ask. And when we ask God for great power or ability, we need to examine our desires and get rid of any selfishness we find.” [6]

“Elijah was taken to heaven without dying. He is the second person mentioned in Scripture to have this honor. Enoch was the first (Gen 5:21-24). The other prophets may not have seen God take Elijah, or they may have had a difficult time believing what they had seen. In either case, they wanted to search for Elijah [vv. 16-18]. Finding no physical trace of him would confirm what had happened and strengthen their faith.” [7]

“The manner of Elijah being separated from Elisha shows the power and authority of God. ‘Because Elijah restrained the desire of the body, he withheld rain from the adulterous; because he kept his body under control, he withdrew from the whoremongers, who let their fountains be loosely poured out. Because the hidden fire of the lust of the body did not rle him, to him the fire from on high was obedient. And since he subdued on the earth the lust of the flesh, he went up there where  holiness dwells.’ [St. Ephrem the Syrian].” [8]

“Like Elijah, Moses also disappeared, for ‘no one known his grave to this day’ (Dt 34:6). The ministries or offices of Moses and Elijah, representing the law of the prophets of God, are fulfilled in Christ (Mt 17:3).” [9]

“For Elijah left a sheepskin [mantle] to his disciple, but the Son of God ascending left to us His own flesh! Elijah indeed, cast off his mantle (cloak), before he went up; but Christ left it behind for our sakes; and yet retained it when He ascended. Let us not then be cast down. Let us not lament, nor fear the difficulty of the times, for He who did not refuse to pour out His blood for all, and has suffered us to partake of His flesh and of His blood again, what will He refuse to do for our safety?” 

~ St. Chrysostom.

[10]

“Elisha did not strike the water out of disrespect for God or Elijah. He was pleading with God to confirm his appointment as Elijah’s successor.” [11]

“The sons of the prophets show proper reverence in the presence of the holy prophet Elisha, a foreshadowing of apostolic succession.” [12]

“As the Lord healed the waters of Jericho with salt, so the incarnate Christ brings renewal to all creation.” [13]

Morning Prayer

Intercessory Prayer

God of justice, God of mercy, bless all those who are surprised with pain this day from suffering caused by their own weakness or that of others. Let what we suffer teach us to be merciful; let our sins teach us to forgive. This we ask through the intercession of Jesus and all who died forgiving those who oppressed them. Amen. [14] 

(THE NEW COMPANION TO THE BREVIARY)


O God, make speed to save us.
O Lord, make haste to help us.

The Invitatory

The Lord is now near, O come let us adore Him!

The Lord, the Almighty, cometh out of Zion  to save His people.

O come let us adore Him! 

🕇 Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit, as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be, world without end. Alleluia! [16]

Antiphon

Send, O Lord, the Lamb, the Ruler of this land: from the rock of the wilderness unto the Mount of the daughter of Zion.

That Thy way, O Lord, may be known upon earth: thy saving health among all nations. 

Reward them, O Lord, that wait for Thee: and let Thy prophets be found faithful. 

[17]
“Abstract Embers” 
By Derek Lawrence Collier
(source)

Midday Reading

What is Embertide? 

In this Third week of Advent, Wednesday (tomorrow), Friday, and Saturday are set apart as Ember Days. What are Ember Days?

“Three days which occur four times a year: the Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday after St. Lucy’s Day (Dec. 13), Ash Wednesday, the Day of Pentecost, and Holy Cross Day (Sept. 14). The name comes from the Latin title Quattuor tempora, meaning ‘four times.’ In ancient Italy the times (originally three) were associated with sowing, harvest, and vintage, for which one prayed, fasted, and gave alms. Later the four times became occasions for ordination, for which the Christian community prayed and the candidates prepared themselves by prayer and retreat.” [18] Tomorrow (Wednesday) will be our first Ember Day for this Advent season.

A St. Lucy Procession in Sweden

“The purpose of their introduction, besides the general one intended by all prayer and fasting, was to thank God for the gifts of nature, to teach men to make use of them in moderation, and to assist the needy… At first the Church in Rome had fasts in June, September, and December; the exact days were not fixed but were announced by the priests. The “Liber Pontificalis” ascribes to Pope Callistus (217-222) a law ordering the fast, but probably it is older. Leo the Great (440-461) considers it an Apostolic institution. When the fourth season was added cannot be ascertained, but Gelasius (492-496) speaks of all four. This pope also permitted the conferring of priesthood and deaconship on the Saturdays of ember week–these were formerly given only at Easter… [Ember Days] were brought into England by St. Augustine; into Gaul and Germany by the Carlovingians. Spain adopted them with the Roman Liturgy in the eleventh century. They were introduced by St. Charles Borromeo into Milan.” [19]

“The BCP (Book of Common Prayer) appoints proper collects and readings for this observance under the title “For the Ministry (Ember Days), including propers ‘For those to be ordained,’ ‘For the choice of fit persons for the ministry,’ and ‘For all Christians in their vocation’ ([1979] BCP, pp. 256-257, 929).” [20] 

“Ember Days may also be kept even when there is no ordination in the diocese as more general days of prayer for those who serve the Church in its various ministries, both ordained and lay, and for vocations.” [21]

“Prayer is the support that brings to fruition the seed of the vocation within the men and women who offer their lives to serve Our Lord. It is through the power of prayer that those seeking the priesthood and the consecrated life are sustained and nurtured. It is through the grace of daily prayer that you will partake in the work of building the culture of vocations. You will be a prayerful participant in the priest’s ordination.” [22]

“Your ‘little prayers’ offered each day will make a great difference. In Mother Teresa’s words, ‘like Jesus we belong to the world living not for ourselves but for others. The joy of the Lord is our strength.’” [23]

Midday Prayer 

And Ordinary Office midday prayer written by David Lucas:

Here in the middle of the day

I take a moment, pause

and pray:

Each breath You give me, God.

You know my heart,

and know its every beat.

You are closer to me than breathing,

nearer than hands or feet.

I matter to You more than many sparrows.

You catch each word I frame.

You care about my day,

design new patterns with my name.

If the day seems dull and empty,

I will gather it to You.

If the day is long and busy,

still I return to You.

Amen.

[24]


O God, make speed to save us.
O Lord, make haste to help us.

The Invitatory

The Lord is now near, O come let us adore Him!

Thou art beautiful above the sons of men: grace is poured abroad in thy lips. 

Let people confess to thee, O, God forever.

O come let us adore Him! 

🕇 Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit, as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be, world without end. Alleluia! [26]

Antiphon 

And thou, Bethlehem, in the land of Judah, art not the least among the princes of Judah: for out of thee shall come a Governour, that shall rule my people Israel. 

Let the mountains break forth with joy, and the hills with righteousness: for the Lord, the Light of the world, cometh with power.

[27]
“St. Peter Preaching in Jerusalem” 
By Charles Poërson 
(source)

Evening Reading: Acts 3:12—4:4

Peter preaches about the prophets

Peter Speaks in Solomon’s Portico

11 While he clung to Peter and John, all the people, utterly astounded, ran together to them in the portico called Solomon’s. 12 And when Peter saw it he addressed the people: “Men of Israel, why do you wonder at this, or why do you stare at us, as though by our own power or piety we have made him walk? 13 The God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob, the God of our fathers, glorified his servant Jesus, whom you delivered over and denied in the presence of Pilate, when he had decided to release him. 14 But you denied the Holy and Righteous One, and asked for a murderer to be granted to you, 15 and you killed the Author of life, whom God raised from the dead. To this we are witnesses. 16 And his name—by faith in his name—has made this man strong whom you see and know, and the faith that is through Jesus has given the man this perfect health in the presence of you all.

17 “And now, brothers, I know that you acted in ignorance, as did also your rulers. 18 But what God foretold by the mouth of all the prophets, that his Christ would suffer, he thus fulfilled. 19 Repent therefore, and turn back, that your sins may be blotted out, 20 that times of refreshing may come from the presence of the Lord, and that he may send the Christ appointed for you, Jesus, 21 whom heaven must receive until the time for restoring all the things about which God spoke by the mouth of his holy prophets long ago. 22 Moses said, ‘The Lord God will raise up for you a prophet like me from your brothers. You shall listen to him in whatever he tells you. 23 And it shall be that every soul who does not listen to that prophet shall be destroyed from the people.’ 24 And all the prophets who have spoken, from Samuel and those who came after him, also proclaimed these days. 25 You are the sons of the prophets and of the covenant that God made with your fathers, saying to Abraham, ‘And in your offspring shall all the families of the earth be blessed.’ 26 God, having raised up his servant, sent him to you first, to bless you by turning every one of you from your wickedness.”

1 And as they were speaking to the people, the priests and the captain of the temple and the Sadducees came upon them, 2 greatly annoyed because they were teaching the people and proclaiming in Jesus the resurrection from the dead. 3 And they arrested them and put them in custody until the next day, for it was already evening. 4 But many of those who had heard the word believed, and the number of the men came to about five thousand.

Evening Lesson

On Peter’s Sermon

“Pilate had decided to release Jesus, but the people had clammored to have Barabbas, a murderer, released instead (see Luke 23:13-15). When Peter said, ‘You killed,’ he meant it literally. Jesus’ trial and death had occurred right there in Jerusalem only weeks earlier. It wasn’t an event of the distant past – most of these people had heard about it, and some may very well have taken part in condemning Jesus.” [28]

“The religious leaders thought they had put an end to Jesus when they crucified Him. But their confidence was shaken when Peter told them that Jesus was alive again and that this time they could not harm Him… After pointing out the sin and injustice of these leaders, Peter showed the significance of the Resurrection: God’s triumph and power over death.” [29]

“Jesus, not the apostles, received the glory of the healing of the lame man. In those days a man’s name represented his character; it stood for his authority and power. By using Jesus’ name, Peter showed who gave him the authority and power to heal. The apostles did not emphasize what they could do but what God could do through them. Jesus’ name is not to be used as magic – it must be used in faith. When we pray in Jesus’ name, we must remember that it is Christ Himself, not merely the sound of His name, who gives our prayers their power.” [30]

In verse 18, Peter pointed out that Christ had fulfilled prophecy. “Some of these prophecies are in Psalm 22; Isaiah 50:6l Isaiah 53 [etc.]. Peter was explaining the kind of Messiah God had sent earth.” [31]

“John the Baptist had prepared the way for Jesus by preaching that people should repent of their sins. The apostles’ message of salvation also included the call to repent… Many people want the benefits of being identified with Christ without admitting their own disobedience and repenting.” [32]

“Most Jews thought that Joshua was the prophet predicted by Moses (Deut 18:15). Peter was saying that the prophet was Jesus Christ. Peter wanted to show that their long-awaited Messiah had come! He and all the apostles were calling the Jewish nation to realize what they had done to their Messiah, to repent, and to believe.” [33]

“Peter’s sermon [vv. 12-26] clarifies several key truths concerning Jesus: (1) He reveals the identity of Jesus, by whose power the lame man was healed. He is God’s Suffering Servant (v. 13), the Holy One (v. 14) of God, the Prince of life (v. 15), the Christ foretold by the prophets (v. 18). (2) As prophesied, Christ was rejected, for the leaders had Him killed (v. 15). But God raised Him, and the apostles are witnesses to that Resurrection (v. 15). (3) The rejection of Christ shows profound ignorance of God’s saving activity (vv. 18-20). (4) The only saving response the people can make is to repent and be converted (v. 19), which is a thorough change of mind and heart. (5) The rewards of conversion include forgiveness of sins, renewal, and confidence in the glorious Second Coming of Christ (vv. 19-26).” [34]

“Repentance always brings blessings from the Lord. Some fear turning away from sin makes life hard to bear. Instead, through repentance, life that was merely existence is transformed into real living – that is, living in faith, love, joy, and confident hope.” [35]

[37]

Vespers Prayer 

Almighty God, we give you thanks for surrounding us, as daylight fades, with the brightness of the vesper light; and we implore you of your great mercy that, as you enfold us with the radiance of this light, so you would shine into our hearts the brightness of your Holy Spirit; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen. [36]

The Small Verse 

      I long for your salvation, O LORD,* 

and your law is my delight. 

      Let me live, and I will praise you,* 

and let your judgments help me. Psalm 

(Psalm 119:174–175)

The Concluding Prayers of the Church

May Almighty God grant me a peaceful night and a perfect end. Amen.


Devotionals compiled/written by S.P. Rogers

Citations:

[1] Episcopal Church. (1979). Daily Office: Daily Morning Prayer: Rite Two. In The Book of common prayer: And administration of the sacraments, and other rites and ceremonies of the church, according to the use of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States of America: Together with the psalter, or, Psalms of David (pp. 80). New York, NY: Church Publishing Incorporated.

[2] Bellarmine, G. (2020). December 14 Matins. In The Roman Breviary in English, in Order, Every Day for October, November, December 2020 (Kindle ed., p. 3683). Christian Books Today.

[3] Lucas, D. (2020). Morning Prayer. Retrieved December 05, 2020, from https://www.anordinaryoffice.co.uk/morning-prayer

[4] Tickle, P. (2006). Advent. In The divine hours: Prayers for Autumn and Wintertime (Kindle ed., vol. 2, p. 353). New York, NY: Image Books.

[5] Tyndale House Publishers. (2012). 2 Kings. In Chronological life application study Bible (p. 739). Carol Stream, IL: Tyndale House Pub.

[6] Ibid. 5

[7] Ibid. 5

[8] Academic Community of St. Athanasius Academy of Orthodox Theology (2008). 4 Kingdoms. In The Orthodox study Bible (p. 485). Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson.

[9] Ibid. 8

[10] Ibid. 8

[11] Tyndale House Publishers. (2012). 2 Kings. In Chronological life application study Bible (p. 739). Carol Stream, IL: Tyndale House Pub.

[12] Academic Community of St. Athanasius Academy of Orthodox Theology (2008). 4 Kingdoms. In The Orthodox study Bible (p. 485). Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson.

[13] Ibid. 12

[14] Tickle, P. (2006). Advent. In The divine hours: Prayers for Autumn and Wintertime (Kindle ed., vol. 2, p. 370). New York, NY: Image Books.

[15] Episcopal Church. (1979). Daily Office: Daily Noonday Prayer: Rite Two. In The Book of common prayer: And administration of the sacraments, and other rites and ceremonies of the church, according to the use of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States of America: Together with the psalter, or, Psalms of David (pp. 107). New York, NY: Church Publishing Incorporated.

[16] Bellarmine, G. (2020). December 17 Lauds. In The Roman Breviary in English, in Order, Every Day for October, November, December 2020 (Kindle ed., p. 3835). Christian Books Today.

[17] Episcopal Church. (1911). Proper of Seasons. In Breviary offices from Lauds to Compline inclusive: Translated from the Sarum Book and Supplemented from Gallican and Monastic Uses (Ebook ed., Printed For The Society Of S. Margaret, Boston, U.S., pp.110). New York, NY: J. Pott &.

[18] Armentrout, D. S., & Slocum, R. B. (2013, March 07). Ember Days. Retrieved December 05, 2020, from https://episcopalchurch.org/library/glossary/ember-days

[19] Mershman, F. (1909). Ember Days. In The Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton Company. Retrieved December 5, 2020 from New Advent: http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/05399b.htm

[20] Armentrout, D. S., & Slocum, R. B. (2013, March 07). Ember Days. Retrieved December 05, 2020, from https://episcopalchurch.org/library/glossary/ember-days

[21] Church of England. (2006). Embertide. Retrieved December 05, 2020, from https://www.churchofengland.org/prayer-and-worship/worship-texts-and-resources/common-worship/churchs-year/times-and-seasons-3

[22] DC Priest. (n.d.). Why is prayer important for the work of vocations? Retrieved December 05, 2020, from https://dcpriest.org/why-is-prayer-important-for-the-work-of-vocations

[23] Ibid. 22

[24] Lucas, D. (2020). Mid-day Prayer. Retrieved December 05, 2020, from https://www.anordinaryoffice.co.uk/mid-day-prayer

[25] Episcopal Church. (1979). Daily Office: Daily Evening Prayer: Rite Two. In The Book of common prayer: And administration of the sacraments, and other rites and ceremonies of the church, according to the use of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States of America: Together with the psalter, or, Psalms of David (pp. 109). New York, NY: Church Publishing Incorporated.

[26] Bellarmine, G. (2020). December 16 Matins. In The Roman Breviary in English, in Order, Every Day for October, November, December 2020 (Kindle ed., p. 3777). Christian Books Today.

[27] Episcopal Church. (1911). Proper of Seasons. In Breviary offices from Lauds to Compline inclusive: Translated from the Sarum Book and Supplemented from Gallican and Monastic Uses (Ebook ed., Printed For The Society Of S. Margaret, Boston, U.S., pp.110). New York, NY: J. Pott &.

[28] Tyndale House Publishers. (2012). Acts. In Chronological life application study Bible (p. 1517). Carol Stream, IL: Tyndale House Pub.

[29] Ibid. 28

[30] Ibid. 28

[31] Ibid. 28

[32] Ibid. 28

[33] Ibid. 28

[34] Academic Community of St. Athanasius Academy of Orthodox Theology (2008). Acts. In The Orthodox study Bible (p. 1503-1504). Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson.

[35] Ibid. 34, P. 1504

[36]. Episcopal Church. (1979). Daily Office: Order for Evening Worship. In The Book of common prayer: And administration of the sacraments, and other rites and ceremonies of the church, according to the use of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States of America: Together with the psalter, or, Psalms of David (pp. 110). New York, NY: Church Publishing Incorporated.[37] Academic Community of St. Athanasius Academy of Orthodox Theology. (2008). Jerusalem in New Testament Times [Map]. In The Orthodox study Bible (p. 1874). Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson.

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